Tag Archives | Brainwaves

FDA Approves Brainwave Helmet To Test Kids For ADHD

ADHDIs this the type of iceberg for diagnosing people using brainwave-analyzing hats? Via Science World Report:

For those who may have been wrongfully diagnosed with the disorder, a new device called the Neuropsychiatric EEG-Based Assessment Aid (NEBA) System that measures electrical impulses given off by neurons in the brain, could more accurately diagnose attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to its creators.

More specifically, this medical tool tests for the ratio between theta and beta waves, as studies have found that children with ADHD tend to have more betas than those without the disorder. With approval of the device, children suspected of having ADHD would wear a cap for 15 to 20 minutes that could help determine a proper diagnosis.

Device manufacturer NEBA Health submitted a clinical study that evaluated 275 children, ages 6 to 17. The cost of the NEBA system and proposed charge for the test have also not be confirmed at this time.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Researchers Successfully Use Subjects’ Brain Waves As Personal Identifiers

brain wavesIn coming years, allowing a machine to momentarily observe your mental activity may be the key to open your email account or front door. Via Dark Reading:

It sounds like something straight out of science fiction: brainwaves taking the place of passwords in the name of authentication. A new study by researchers from the U.C. Berkeley School of Information examined the brainwave signals of individuals performing specific actions to see whether they can be consistently matched to the right individual.

Participants were asked to imagine performing a repetitive motion from a sport of their choice, singing a song, watching a series of on-screen images and silently counting the objects, or choose their own thought and focus on it for 10 seconds.

To measure the subjects’ brainwaves, the team used the NeuroSky Mindset, a Bluetooth headset that records Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. In the end, the team was able to match the brainwave signals with 99 percent accuracy.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Tin Foil Hats Actually Enable Mind Control

ali2Does fashioning a “helmet” out of aluminum foil to block government-beamed mind control waves actually work? MIT’s Ali Rahimi (at right) and several colleagues found that the foil magnifies, rather than blocks, radio waves, specifically at government-controlled frequencies — oops. There are great pictures of the “study” being conducted:

We evaluated the performance of three different helmet designs, commonly referred to as the Classical, the Fez, and the Centurion. The helmets were made of Reynolds aluminium foil. As per best practices, all three designs were constructed with the double layering technique described elsewhere.

A radio-frequency test signal sweeping the ranges from 10 Khz to 3 Ghz was generated using an omnidirectional antenna attached to the Agilent 8714ET’s signal generator.

The helmets amplify frequency bands that coincide with those allocated to the US government between 1.2 Ghz and 1.4 Ghz. According to the FCC, These bands are supposedly reserved for ”radio location” (ie, GPS), and other communications with satellites.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Are We A Step Closer To Reading Minds?

787px-Pyramidal_hippocampal_neuron_40x

Photo: MethoxyRoxy (CC)

Glasgow University has begun to ‘decode’ brainwaves. If successful, researchers believe the findings could lead to brain-computer interface. BBC News reports:

Scientists believe they are a step closer to being able to read people’s minds after decoding human brainwaves.

Glasgow University researchers asked volunteers to identify different emotions on images of human faces.

They then measured the volunteers’ resulting brainwaves using a technique called electroencephalography (EEG).

Once researchers compared the answers to the brainwaves recorded, they were able to decode the type of information the brainwaves held relating to vision.

The research was carried out by the university’s institute of neuroscience and psychology.

Six volunteers were presented with images of people’s faces, displaying different emotions such as happiness, fear and surprise.

[Continues at BBC News]

Read the rest

Continue Reading