Tag Archives | Brooklyn

Brooklyn’s Gangster Graveyard

By Whit Andrews via Flickr (cc by 2.0)

By Whit Andrews via Flickr (cc by 2.0)

via The Daily Beast:

On a sprawling, idyllic cluster of rolling hills in an otherwise industrial section of New York City, history’s finest and most notorious have been laid to rest.

Green-Wood Cemetery should have its own ZIP code. Covering nearly 500 acres in the middle of Brooklyn, the land of the dead feels a world away from the skyscrapers of Manhattan, visible in the distance from the hilltops.

Visitors are greeted by a looming gothic gate, the kind used to signify that important residents lie behind its spires. The cemetery is home to 560,000 dead. In past lives, the area served as the location of the Battle of Long Island during the Revolutionary War. Once the first dead were interred in 1838, it became the country’s second biggest tourism attraction thanks to its scenic and fashionable burial grounds. In the 1860s there were more sightseers than entombed residents, as 500,000 visitors flocked there per year.

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Viva la Muerte! Holy Death Comes to Brooklyn

Morbid Anatomy Library Acquisition Number 1,352: New Lot of Santa Muerte Related Materials from Mexico

The Morbid Anatomy Library’s most recent acquisition brings the Boney Lady to Brooklyn, NY:

“The Morbid Anatomy Library is delighted to announce the acquisition of a new lot of materials related to Santa Muerte, which is, depending on whom you ask, a Mexican-based “cult” or “new religion” which worships death as a female saint.

Santa Muerte,” which literally translates to “Holy Death” or “Saint Death,” is popular in Mexico and the United States with disenfranchised populations for whom conventional Catholicism has not provided a better or safer life. It is thought to have its roots in the rich syncretism of the beliefs of the native Latin Americans and the colonizing Spanish Catholics.

The artifacts donated to the library, many of which you see above, include sacred books and pamphlets, devotional statues, magical soaps and oils, charms, incense, and even “La Biblia de la Santa Muerte.” They were generously donated by Friends of Morbid Anatomy Tonya Hurley and Tracy Hurley Martin as found on their travels in Mexico.”

These items have joined the library’s other “curiosities, books, photographs, artworks, ephemera, and artifacts relating to medical museums, anatomical art, collectors and collecting, cabinets of curiosity, the history of medicine, death and society, natural history, arcane media, and curiosity and curiosities broadly considered,” and are now on display in their collection.… Read the rest

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Is There a Numerologically-Minded Serial Killer Stalking New York?

Photo: DC Belanger (PD)

Via New York Daily News:

Police aren’t publicly committing to any one theory yet, but they are examining the possibility that the murderer of two people may have chosen his victims for numerological reasons:

Brooklyn shopkeepers are on alert after cops linked two storeowners’ murders to the same gun and suggested the killer might be using numerology to choose his targets.

Isaac Kadare’s store at 1877 86th St., where he was killed last Thursday, and Mohammed Gebeli’s shop at 7718 Fifth Ave., where he was found dead July 6, both have addresses using the same three numbers — a fact that has workers shaken.

Read more here.

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Would You Eat Another Person?

Photo: WNYC (CC)

Forget about the “yes if I was starving to death after a plane crash” answer. How about if it was part of a Brooklyn food festival? If you’re Anthony Bourdain, “Yes, yes, I fucking would.” (Apparently he’d like to deep fry Dick Cheney’s head, fuck him up the ass and then cook him. Each to his own, I guess.) Dana Goodyear reports on modern cannibalism for The New Yorker:

Probably the most scandalous assertion of Upton Sinclair’s fictional exposé of Packingtown was that the careless, virtually unregulated, factory-style processing of meat that was the norm at the turn of the century was making unwitting cannibals of the American public. Men working in the steam rooms, he wrote, would fall into open vats in the floor

“and when they were fished out, there was never enough of them left to be worth exhibiting—sometimes they would be overlooked for days, till all but the bones of them had gone out to the world as Durham’s Pure Leaf Lard!”

Cannibalism—whether unintentional, deliberate (as with the Donner Party, the Uruguayan rugby team, and scores of sailors in extremis) or plain murderous (the recent incident in Florida)—represents the most troubling extreme of our omnivorous condition.

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