Tag Archives | Burning Man

Always Sell Your Best Hallucinations: An Interview with Dave Wyndorf of Monster Magnet

cobrasandfireActual Photo of Dave Wyndorf’s Attic

It’s not everyday you get to interview one of your heroes, let alone at complete random. So, the backstory to this interview goes like this: I somehow got on a metal PR distribution list because of something I wrote years ago. I don’t even remember what I wrote that got me on this list in the first place…at all. Being not much of a straight up metal guy, I occasionally download an album or 2 and am typically like, ummm, no. I get roughly 5 of these messages a week and this has been going on for years now. I had thus far responded to exactly none of these requests. As a matter of fact, I haven’t even done a musician interview since 2013. Then all of a sudden there it was in my inbox. Hey, do you want to interview Dave Wyndorf of Monster Magnet?… Read the rest

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Burning Man Might Sue Quiznos for Mocking the Festival

This is kind of hilarious, via The Verge:

This one’s almost too perfect.

Take Burning Man, the annual, drug-addled, desert hippie festival that was formed on tenets of self-reliance and anti-capitalism. Add a brilliantly-executed parody video (sponsored by the Quiznos sandwich chain, no less) that skewers the whole affair for getting overrun by corporate influence and rich Silicon Valley types.

What do you get? A lawsuit, apparently. The nonprofit behind Burning Man (unsurprisingly) lacks a sense of humor, and it didn’t take well to the parody trailer, which mimics The Maze Runner as it sees a group of millennials enter into the strange, strange world of Burners.

Read more here.

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Festivals, Politics, and Change

Some enlightening words by David Nickles, of the DMT-Nexus’ magazine – The Nexian:

We can collectively dream of worlds that surpass our wildest individual imaginings and bring them into being year-after-year—and we do. Is it really less conceivable that we could take actions in our daily lives to challenge the systems and structures that seek to deny us access to that which we need to survive? By all means, change yourself and your festival culture, but don’t stop there. Unless we act to dismantle the destructive cultural constraints that hold us hostage, our change will never manifest beyond personal revelations and state-sanctioned temporary autonomous zones. We know we are capable of incredible actions; now is the time to focus on ways to break free of the culturally-prescribed containers of festival settings and to build new worlds that truly realize our fundamental needs as human beings.

Humberto Braga recently wrote an article entitled “How and Why ‘Conscious’ Festivals Need to Change,” where he argued forgoing one year of Burning Man in order to buy our way out of dominant culture by building a techno-utopic retreat.

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Burning Man Arsonist Apparently Commits Suicide

San Francisco’s newspaper is reporting the death of Paul Addis, who in 2007 “spent time in prison for setting the Burning Man wooden icon on fire four days too soon.”

The notorious “Burning Man Arsonist” (and performance artist) served nearly two years in prison for what he’d described as an act of protest. “This was not an act of vengeance, it was one of love,” he’s remembered as saying in the San Francisco newspaper. “A love of the ethos that is fading at Burning Man. There’s no sense of spontaneity. No sense of ‘Fuck it. Let’s burn this down.'”

At the time, he was appearing as Hunter S. Thompson in a one-man stage play called Gonzo: A Brutal Chrysalis. San Francisco’s newspaper reports that in 2008 he was also arrested against outside a San Francisco church with a backpack filled with fireworks “after telling neighbors the church ‘isn’t going to be there anymore.'”

This Saturday night, he was killed after throwing himself in front of a BART commuter train.… Read the rest

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Secrets in Plain Site: Burning Man

via Scott Onstott at SecretsInPlainSight.com

I was invited to go to Burning Man when it was at Baker Beach in San Francisco in 1989. At the time I remember wondering what would

Burning Man Black Rock City

inspire people to ritually burn an effigy of a man on the beach, and thinking it particularly chthonic (which didn’t appeal to my Apollonian nature) I didn’t go. After being hassled by the “authorities” in San Francisco, Burning Man moved to the Black Rock Desert in Northern Nevada in 1990 and has been hosted there ever since. 51,515 people attended burning man in 2010 and attendance was capped at 50,000 thereafter. The maximum attendance reminds me of the Great Pyramid slope angle of 51 deg 51 min but maybe that’s “just a coincidence.”

The reason I’m writing about Burning Man is because I looked at it in Google Earth and was amazed that this annual pilgrimage site in a remote desert occurs within a temporary urban design called Black Rock City (BRC) that appears to be a magical diagram.

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Burners Invade the Bible-Belt!

The repressive, racist, red-state culture of the Bible-Belt has been invaded by Burners!  Apparently, it’s no longer just a west coast phenomenon. The Burner subculture, along with its unique form of totally participatory, commerce-free weekend camping festivals, can now be found even in the darkest corners of the former Confederacy.  Within half a decade, events like Transformus, Alchemy, and Euphoria (held this past weekend near Dalton, GA) have brought the culture and philosophy of Burning Man to the part of the country where, arguably, it is most needed.  And the people down here really seem to enjoy it!

Hell, I’m a thirty-year-old veteran Disinfonaut, and I still enjoyed it.  At least when I was smart enough to get my tickets early …  Two out of three of these festivals, all official Burning Man Regional events, each sold out within hours.  My friends and I were so bummed out that we couldn’t go, that we decide to throw a couple of Burn events on our own. … Read the rest

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The Rise of the New Spiritual Counterculture

Occupy Wall Street MediationIt’s February 17 and I’m standing in front of a full room at Gatsby Books in Long Beach, CA.  Once again, we’ve filled up the seats and people are standing in the back as I deliver my opening line, “If you told me several years, I’d be here talking about Jesus and ayahuasca, I would have laughed my ass off.”  But perhaps more incredible than tales of spiritual awakening is that here I am on the final night of my Electric Jesus West Coast book tour, knowing we have shattered the odds.

Enthusiastic crowds have greeted me at almost all of my sixteen stops. This shouldn’t be happening as first-time author in a wilting publishing industry. But I’ve had a secret grassroots weapon, one that a lot of mainstream America doesn’t know about — it’s the flourishing new spiritual counterculture.

The audience in Gatsby Books is dressed in hipster vintage printed tees and American Apparel cotton hoodies with esoteric flares of spiral plug earrings and Peruvian indigenous bracelets.… Read the rest

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Burning Man Has (Literally) Sold Out

Burning ManAnyone going this year? If not, ever been? If not … Andrew Averill writes on SF Gate:

Many Burning Man festival participants climb a huge butterfly art structure to watch the sunrise over the playa. This year, the festival’s permit limits participants to 50,000 at one time.

When the first Burning Man event took place on San Francisco’s Baker Beach in 1986, it was such a lawless free-for-all that when it came time to burn The Man, a woman ran toward the engulfed 20-foot-tall humanoid structure and held its hand while wind blew the flames away from her.

Twenty-five years later, the annual event has become a mass sojourn into the Nevada Black Rock desert — one that some of its most loyal followers complain is becoming increasingly rigid and commercial.

And now it has come to this: For the first time ever, Burning Man has literally sold out. Organizers were forced to cap the number of attendees to the weeklong event, an art-focused, community-centric festival that starts Aug.

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