Ok, so we highly recommend that you do not actually do what you’ve seen in this video. It’s best to be calm, cool, collected and talk in a normal tone when addressing police officers. This footage was shot a couple of years ago, when Luke Rudkowski had a very bad day and was still maturing as a journalist. WeAreChange strongly believes in the right to film in public, but many times police officers incorrectly view this as a crime and use intimidation to stop the legal right to film. This time the opposite scenario played out, which we wanted to share with you.

Via WeAreChange

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Bad AppleF@ck you, Apple (had to get that out of my system). Fox News reports:

CUPERTINO, Calif. — Fans at concerts and sports games may soon be stopped from using their iPhones to film the action —as a result of new technology being considered by Apple, The Times of London reported Thursday.

The California company has plans to build a system that will sense when a person is trying to film a live event using a cell phone and automatically switch off their camera.

A patent application filed by Apple, and obtained by the Times, reveals how the software would work. If a person were to hold up their iPhone, the device would trigger the attention of infra-red sensors installed at the venue. These sensors would then instruct the iPhone to disable its camera.

Apple declined to comment.