Tag Archives | Celebrity Culture

Kardashians Release Family Christmas Card Laden With Illuminati Symbolism

illuminatiIs the Kardashians’ official 2013 Christmas card a playful satire of conspiracy theories regarding Illuminati-celebrity connections, or is something more sinister afoot? Infowars is disturbed:

Shot by elite fashion photographer David Lachapelle, the panoramic card is filled with symbolism and references describing everything that the Illuminati entertainment industry is about.

Behind the Jenner sisters are two Illuminati pyramids, complete with the All-Seeing Eye. The card can’t be clearer about who “owns” this entire family. Scattered around the card are dismembered mannequins, a symbol that is often used to represent Mind Control, a practice that is rampant in the Illuminati entertainment industry.

Kylie wears a vulva-shaped headdress making her look like some kind of high priestess. Above them is a cardboard cutout looking like a baby-Jesus, with a glory around its head. Is that North West?

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Cynthia, The First Artificial-Human Celebrity

proxyHow To Be A Retronaut has an amazing collection of photos of “Cynthia of Saks Fifth Avenue”, an eerily prescient, analog version of the computer-created pop personalities which have begun to emerge today:

‘In 1932, artist Lester Gaba created a mannequin known as Cynthia for Saks Fifth Avenue. Cynthia had realistic imperfections like freckles and pigeon toes. Cartier and Tiffany sent her jewelry, Lilly Daché designed hats for her, and couturiers sent her their latest fashions, furrieries sent minks. She was given a credit card from Saks Fifth Avenue, a box seat subscription to the Metropolitan Opera House and made the cover of Life Magazine.

Cynthia had her own newspaper column, and a successful radio show. She went to Hollywood to appear in Artist And Models Abroad with Jack Benny, in 1938 and was photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

‘Cynthia met her demise when she slipped from a chair in a beauty salon and shattered.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

February 4: The Death Day Of Karen Carpenter

Joseph Allen writes about Karen’s hunger for affection at RockStarMartyr.net:

2-2 KC Superstar still

From Todd Haynes' "Superstar" (1987)

I’ve been listening to The Carpenters for three days straight. Does that make me a pansy? Of course not. These are sentimental love songs from a woman to a man—well, from Karen to me—and that’s miles from the pink-zone. Karen’s motherly voice pours suburban melancholy into my open wounds. I dare any road-hardened man to sit by himself—with a fifth of whiskey and a loaded gun—and listen to “Solitaire” as many times as I have. You’ll never make it out alive.

Karen Carpenter’s biography is as heart-wrenching as her wistful tenor. Her musical virtuosity was matched only by her willingness to be a victim to her controlling family, her conniving husband, and ultimately, to her own maniacal vanity, for which she starved herself to death. Randy Schmidt’s new book, Little Girl Blue: The Life of Karen Carpenter, weaves first-hand accounts of Karen’s futile quest to become a grown woman, which ended in her childhood home on February 4, 1983, at age 32.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

February 3: The Death Day Of Buddy Holly

Buddy_HollyJoseph Allen writes about “the Buddy Holly Curse” on RockStarMartyr.net:

Anything cool you ever did, Buddy Holly did first. Those trend-lemming black specs? Buddy wore those when glasses were for nerds. Your hip, four-piece rock band? Buddy set that standard, son. Radical race-mixing? Buddy played with black musicians and married a Latina before such associations yielded multiculti cred—back when it got you bludgeoned by mongrels. Those teenage girls shaking hips by the jukebox? Buddy got the first slice of Miss American Pie, and by all accounts, she was home-grown cherry. And your tragic demise in the passenger seat of a hexed death-machine? Buddy beat you to it, dude. He’ll be worshipped forever, and you’ll be another statistic.

Like a sacrificial life-force, rock n’ roll was in Buddy Holly’s blood. His voice won over crowds from kindergarten on. As a teen in 1955, Buddy marveled at Elvis’ rockabilly performances, eventually opening for the King later that year.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

February 2: The Death Day of Sid Vicious

Sid Vicious NY Mug ShotJoseph Allen writes at RockStarMartyr.net:

John Simon Ritchie’s career with the Sex Pistols only lasted nine months, but through the miraculous power of media spin he was transfigured into the original punk rock martyr—Sid Vicious, dead at 21. He was smeared across pop culture’s porcelain temple on February 2, 1979, immortalized in black leather, oily spiked hair, and dripping bodily fluids.

Next to him, rendered in blood-spattered stained glass, resides the junk-adled groupie who dominated him in life and defined him in death—”Nauseating” Nancy Spungen, dead at 20. Sid and Nancy. For three generations, vast segments of our disaffected youth have followed in their staggering footsteps, slamming syringe plungers to a rock n’ roll soundtrack and smashing up their little corners of an unbearably boring society. Oi! Oi!

The Sex Pistols left an indelible stamp upon the soul of punk rock. The genre’s grim sarcasm doesn’t gnaw much harder than vocalist Johnny Rotten’s “Bodies” or “No Feelings.” Their one true album, Never Mind the Bullocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols, is an enduring classic of cocky rebellion—for which Sid Vicious deserves no real credit, except for his sneering face.… Read the rest

Continue Reading