Change

How did all these oddballs become so popular? What happened? Where exactly did the Kool-Aid come from? Everything from flat earth theory to national socialism has found its way into a fairly mainstream discourse.





The most important revolutionary aspect of the printed page: it allowed people to learn how to improve themselves and change the way they thought about the world Disinfo has echoed the point that…



Venkat writes at Ribbonfarm: Both science fiction and futurism seem to miss an important piece of how the future actually turns into the present. They fail to capture the way we don’t…


This 2007 CBS News report on “an incredibly strange thing” called Twitter drives home the accelerating pace of change in which we find ourselves. To journalists five years ago, the parameters of our existence today seemed frightening and scarcely imaginable:


Planet Under Pressure commissioned a 3-minute animated film showing the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on an equivalent scale to major geological processes. Whether you agree with the filmmakers’ conclusions or not (comment below), I suspect you’ll admit that it’s a pretty cool piece of animation:

Welcome to the Anthropocene


Nick Meador writes on his blog: It appears we are living at the dawn of a new era. Throughout our culture we see signs of change, progress, and evolution. A “Creative Class”…


“Time Conquers All”, in Latin. A pithy little meditation on the transience of this vale of tears, paradoxically immortalized by being phrased in a dead language. My pal Pete found it written…






Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez writes at Common Dreams: In the latest issue of Orion Magazine, environmental activists Derrick Jensen and Paul Kingsnorth both express their frustrations with the current environmental movement. Jensen takes…


This is embarrassing for anyone who voted for “Hope and Change” … and the highest score goes to former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, who was not even allowed to debate in televised debates. So reports Bob Egelko in the San Fransisco Chronicle:

The highest overall rating went to former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson, a Republican-turned-Libertarian, who opposes the Patriot Act and — unlike Obama — supports the right of gays and lesbians to marry. Among the leading Republican candidates, libertarian-leaning Rep. Ron Paul also got a higher score than Obama despite low ratings in several categories.








“So my immodest proposal is simply this,” as posed by Alex Pareene on Salon.com: Individuals and households in the bottom 99 percent who owe debt to any large financial institution that received…