Tag Archives | China

Chinese Restaurant Makes Its Noodles Addictive – With Opium Poppies

Well this is one way to make your restaurant’s noodles completely addictive! From South China Morning Post (h/t Oginikwe, who thought y’all might be interested in this since we are importing so much of our food, vitamins, and ingredients from China):

A noodle shop owner was detained after he was discovered to have been adding parts of a poppy plant – from which opium is made – to food so that customers would keep coming back.

ChineseNoodles

The noodle shop’s owner was held for questioning and confessed that he purchased 2kg of poppy shells (the bud of the plant in which poppy seeds are found) for 600 yuan (HK$756) in August.

He secretly added it to the food to lure in more customers.

The owner was detained for 10 days. Poppy shells used to be an ingredient in a popular hot pot sauce until the product was banned, according to previous reports.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

A Nervous China Is ‘Interested’ In A Possible Role In The Fight Against ISIS

Screenshot_of_Abu_Bakr_al-Baghdadi

via Business Insider:

BEIJING, China — The Islamic State is flush with cash, territorially ambitious and eager for recognition.

But is IS a threat to China?

That’s been a question on foreign policy minds since US National Security Adviser Susan Rice’s trip to Beijing earlier this month.

The trip, billed as preparation for President Obama’s trip to China in November, went off without serious glitches — other than a mildly embarrassing mix-up on state TV with that other Rice (Condoleezza).

But Rice’s visit was overshadowed by the unfolding chaos in Iraq and Syria, brought about by IS.

Would China be willing to lend its support to an international coalition against this growing threat to world security?

The official response from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA) was boilerplate: “The Chinese government staunchly fights against any form of terrorism.”

Privately, “They are interested,” argues Chen Dingding, assistant professor of Government and Public Administration at the University of Macau.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Inside China’s Dwarf Empire

‘To westerners, it may seem voyeuristic and immoral, but this is China and – for the people who come here and for many of the performers – this is simply not an issue,’ says De Wilde Photograph: Sanne De Wilde

‘To westerners, it may seem voyeuristic and immoral, but this is China and – for the people who come here and for many of the performers – this is simply not an issue,’ says De Wilde Photograph: Sanne De Wilde via The Guardian

Exploitation at its finest. Even if the Chinese don’t see it that way, it certainly is.

via The Guardian:

The Dwarf Empire – or, to give it its full name, The World Eco Garden of Butterflies and the Dwarf Empire – is situated in the mountains of southern China near the new city of Kunming. Created in 2009, it is a tourist attraction boasting two daily performances by 100 dwarves, who live and work in an elaborate fantasy world ruled by an emperor and empress. To western eyes, it looks like a remnant of the Victorian freak show.

“In 2011, I accidentally found an image online of Chinese tourists posing with little people,” says Sanne De Wilde, a young Belgian-born, Amsterdam-based photographer.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

China: No Cult Zone

Naval_battle_between_Taiping-Qing_on_Yangtze

Actual photo of Naval battle between Taiping-Qing armies on Yangtze River. The caption in French says: “Canonnade des Taiping contre les jonques de guerre des Tsing qui assiégeaient la capital du Royaume céleste.” (“Taiping cannon fire against the Qing war junks that are assaulting the capital of the celestial kingdom”).

Remember the cult killing in a Chinese McDonald’s by members of the Church of the Almighty God? The Economist examines the history of “cults” in China in light of this recent crime.

via The Economist:

ON AUGUST 21st five members of a banned religious sect known as the Church of the Almighty God went on trial for a murder that has gripped the country. One evening in May, in front of stunned customers at a McDonald’s in the eastern city of Zhaoyuan, in Shandong province, the suspects allegedly beat to death a woman who had refused to give them her phone number.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Magic Square and the Numbers Eight and Nine

[disinfo ed.'s note: The following is excerpted from China's Cosmological Prehistory: The Sophisticated Science Encoded in Civilization's Earliest Symbols by Laird Scranton]

Integral to both the plan of the ancient Chinese city and the nine-plot layout of the well-field system—and to concepts of divination in ancient China—is the notion of the Lo Shu square, or magic square, sometimes referred to as the “nine halls diagram.” This figure is essentially a grid of nine squares, arranged like the well-field plots into a larger square, consisting of three squares per side (see below). Each smaller square is associated with one of the cardinal numbers from one to nine, arranged in such a way so that the sum of the three integers along any column or diagonal produces a total of fifteen.

Magic Square Lo Shu.svg

Although there are variations in the myths, the invention of the magic square in China is traditionally assigned to Fu-xi at around 3000 BCE.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Onscreen text messages at the movie theater?

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

There is no other place in the world that can ease my anxiety or release my troubled mind than the cinema. There’s something special about watching a film on a large screen with like minded movie-goers surrounding you. And while I doubt this newfangled idea will catch-on, it’s still irritating to think about. Though, and I have to admit, that I’m often more annoyed by the loud popcorn crunchers and rustling wrappers than I am by someone looking at their phone.

via The Hollywood Reporter:

Theaters in major Chinese cities have starting experimenting with “bullet screens” on which audiences can send text messages commenting on the film, which are then projected directly onto the screen.

If you’re sensitive to people using their cellphones during a movie, then going to the movie theater in China would be far from relaxing experience.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Inside the Chinese cult that killed a “demon” in McDonald’s

Critic posts against Almighty God church in Beijing, close to Confucius Temple. By Mongol via Wikimedia Commons

Critic posts against Almighty God church in Beijing, close to Confucius Temple. By Mongol via Wikimedia Commons

I guess refusing to give out your phone number makes you a demon.

via BBC:

China is about to try one of the most notorious murders in recent memory.

In late May a group belonging to a banned cult beat a woman to death in a fast food restaurant. Her only crime was to refuse to give them her telephone number.

The cult in question is called the Church of the Almighty God and claims to have millions of members.

It was an ordinary evening in a small town McDonald’s in east China until a family of six arrived trying to recruit new members to their Christian cult.

They moved between the tables asking for phone numbers and when one diner refused they beat her to death, screaming at other diners to keep away or they would face the same fate.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

China Daily reports that there are over 150 Chinese economic fugitives in U.S.

800px-Flag_of_the_People's_Republic_of_China.svg

via Bloomberg News:

More than 150 people suspected of economic crimes from China remain at large in the U.S., China Daily said yesterday, as officials pledge to step up efforts to hunt down those who take their ill-gotten gains abroad.

Most of those who fled to the U.S. are officials facing corruption charges at home, the China Daily reported, citing Liao Jinrong, director general of the International Cooperation Bureau of the Ministry of Public Security. The U.S. has become the top destination for so-called economic fugitives from China because the two countries don’t have an extradition treaty and lengthy legal procedures make it difficult to bring them back to China, the newspaper cited Liao as saying.

Chinese leaders have escalated a campaign against graft, announcing a probe into former security chief Zhou Yongkang last month. The anti-corruption campaign, begun after President Xi Jinping took over the Communist Party in 2012, won’t stop with Zhou, a commentary in the official People’s Daily newspaper said July 29.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

A River Runs Red in China

Last week, a river in Wenzhou that was once considered to be clean enough to drink from mysteriously turned bright red.

red-river-china-140728

Via Tech Times:

The river is located at Wenzhou, a popular town in the eastern Chinese province of Zhejiang. The place is bordered on the three sides with mountains while the front faces the Pacific Ocean. Residents are proud of their place particularly with the river which they describe as one of the healthiest and cleanest rivers in their province. This was attributed to the fact that there are no factories found along the river’s banks.

Residents claim that prior to the incident, the river thrives in marine life as they can easily catch fish in it. It is so clean that one can even safely drink the water which normally tastes good.

According to the residents, it was the first time that they’ve seen the river change its color.

Read the rest
Continue Reading