Tag Archives | CIA

Dear Mr. President, It’s Time to Obey the Law: Release the JFK Secret Service Records and End Other Needless Secrecy

US Secret Service - Motorcade Support Unit by Cliff via Flickr (CC By 2.0).

US Secret Service – Motorcade Support Unit by Cliff via Flickr (CC By 2.0).

via Alternet:

Dear Mr. President,

We know you have many pressing issues on your plate, but last week’s problems with the Secret Service and White House security also warrant your attention. What if the man who sprinted across the White House lawn–and into your home–hadn’t been a troubled ex-serviceman, but instead had been an terrorist from ISIS or Al Qaeda or a violent American white supremacist?

As you know, last week’s incidents were only the latest in a long line of Secret Service problems involving lax protection of you and your family, heavy drinking and irresponsible behavior by some agents, and racial discrimination. What you probably don’t know is that those problems have been issues for the Service since the early 1960s. One reason you–and most of the American public–aren’t aware of those issues is the culture of secrecy that sometimes pervades the agency when it comes to its own shortcomings.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

CIA Admits It Watched Over Destruction Of Journalist Gary Webb

Gary Webb In His Own Words 623.jpg

Gary Webb is posthumously achieving recognition for his “Dark Alliance” investigative report of the CIA’s involvement in the importation of cocaine to finance its illegal involvement in backing the Contras in Nicaragua. There’s a movie coming out portraying Webb and now The Intercept reveals the CIA’s admission that it was closely watching Webb’s activities and eventual death:

Eighteen years after it was published, “Dark Alliance,” the San Jose Mercury News’s bombshell investigation into links between the cocaine trade, Nicaragua’s Contra rebels, and African American neighborhoods in California, remains one of the most explosive and controversial exposés in American journalism.

The 20,000-word series enraged black communities, prompted Congressional hearings, and became one of the first major national security stories in history to blow up online. It also sparked an aggressive backlash from the nation’s most powerful media outlets, which devoted considerable resources to discredit author Gary Webb’s reporting. Their efforts succeeded, costing Webb his career. On December 10, 2004, the journalist was found dead in his apartment, having ended his eight-year downfall with two .38-caliber bullets to the head.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

CIA brags about media manipulation and more

In the latest Freedom of Information Act CIA disclosure, the agency reveals media manipulation, foreign covert operations details, and a moment by moment account of being by Bush’s side the morning of 9/11 and more.

Screen-Shot-2014-09-18-at-1.44.11-PM3

via The Intercept:

The CIA has declassified a trove of articles from its in-house journal, Studies in Intelligence. Ostensibly a semi-academic review of spycraft, Studies emerges in the pieces, which date from the 1970s to the 2000s, as so much more, at turns mocking excessive secrecy and bad writing, dishing on problematic affairs, and bragging about press manipulation.

Of course, there is plenty of self-serious material in the journal too, including scholarly reviews, first-person memoirs, interviews and intellectual ruminations on everything from maps to “How We Are Perceived” and “Ethics and Clandestine Collection.”

The CIA posted the hundreds of declassified articles to its FOIA site. Here are a few that caught our eye.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The CIA is getting away with keeping every important secret about torture

“A definitive Senate report about one of America’s darkest periods continues to be withheld – precisely because the agency behind it refuses to come clean,” writes Trevor Timm at The Guardian:

At this point, is there anything the Central Intelligence Agency thinks it can’t get away with?

To recap: the CIA systematically tortured people, then lied about it. Destroyed evidence of it, then lied about that. Spied on the US Senate staffers investigating the agency for torture, then lied about that. Now, after somehow being put in charge of deciding what parts of the Senate’s final report on that torture should be redacted, the CIA has predictively censored the key evidence of the litany of all of those transgressions.

The agency’s black marker has reportedly censored – at different points in the report – already-public, embarrassing and criminally culpable information. By doing so, the CIA has rendered it, as one Senator noted, “incomprehensible”.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Obama Admits That CIA Tortured ‘Some Folks’

Still from "Doctors of the Dark Side"

Still from “Doctors of the Dark Side

Many Americans have called foul over the CIA torture program but up till now the US Government has steadfastly denied using interrogation techniques that were really torture. The documentary film Doctors of the Dark Side, for one, horrifyingly showed the complicity of American doctors and medical professionals in designing these torture techniques for the CIA and military. Now President Obama is finally admitting that it truly was torture, reports ABC News:

President Obama today admitted the CIA tortured al Qaeda detainees after the 9/11 attacks, saying “we did some things that were contrary to our values.”

“We tortured some folks,” the president told reporters at the White House, ahead of the release of a Senate report on enhanced interrogation techniques.

In a rare reflection on the practices that he banned after taking office, the president said, “I understand why it happened” and underscored the tremendous pressure that national security officials were under in the aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Media Roots Radio – Occupy Silicon Valley

Abby and Robbie Martin discuss the potentiality of an ‘Occupy Silicon Valley’ protest movement in a similar mold to ‘Occupy Oakland’ taking place in California’s San Francisco Bay Area. They address the ethical issues revolving around tech-companies like Facebook, Google, Apple, Microsoft, Soundcloud and debunk the notion that private corporations will install privacy safeguards on their own without the pressure of public consumer outrage. Robbie goes into the history of Silicon Valley’s roots, which tie directly to the Pentagon’s post-WWII defense industry private sector push.
Continue Reading

Disinformation: A Deliberately Devious Word

Fancy that – the Wall Street Journal has a whole article about our trademarked brand name:

Connoisseurs of delicious irony must have been pleased when the latest edition of the CIA’s “Style Manual & Writers Guide for Intelligence Publications” circulated online last week.

The 185-page style guide, made public thanks to a Freedom of Information Act request by a group of attorneys known as the National Security Counselors, stresses that “good intelligence depends in large measure on clear, concise writing.”

disinfo

But within its pages is a reminder that intelligence officers are not always so forthright in their communication. In a section on “possibly troublesome words,” the meanings of “misinformation” and “disinformation” are carefully distinguished. ” ‘Disinformation’ refers to the deliberate planting of false reports,” the style guide advises. ” ‘Misinformation’ equates in meaning but does not carry the same devious connotation.

The “devious connotation” of “disinformation” originated in the Cold War wrangling of intelligence agencies on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Supreme Court Declines To Intercede On Behalf Of Reporter James Risen: What’s Next?

state of warNew York Times reporter James Risen, author of “State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration”, won’t give up one of his sources, and now that the Supreme Court won’t hear his case, he could be facing some serious prison time. The Washington Post has a run-down on what’s likely to happen now:

So what does this mean for Risen’s case? Will the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter be sent to prison? What does he have to say about the decision? And how does this fit into the Obama administration’s war on leaks? Here’s a primer on what is going on, where things stand and what could happen next.

Who is James Risen?

Risen is a reporter for the New York Times who writes about national security issues. In 2006, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his stories about the Bush administration’s domestic wiretapping program.  He continues to write about national security, and published a front-page story Sunday about how the National Security Agency is intercepting massive numbers of images shared to social media platforms to use in facial recognition programs.

Read the rest
Continue Reading