Tag Archives | Cinema

Apocalypse Pooh: One of the earliest mash-ups (Bonus: Blue Peanuts)

I’m ashamed to say that I just came across this, thanks to Slate

This is by far the most meticulously edited mash-up I’ve seen. I’m very impressed. A hauntingly surreal Winnie the Pooh.

Apocalypse Pooh:

Via the YouTube page:

This is a recently remastered version of Todd Graham’s original 1987 VCR-made remix that appropriates famous fictional animals from Disney’s animated version of Winnie the Pooh and recasts them as characters in Francis Ford Coppola’s gritty Vietnam War drama Apocalypse Now. In the new narrative, the beloved Hundred Acre Wood is transformed into a horrific war zone in which Pooh, Piglet, and the rest of the gang struggle to keep their sanity. The humorous and slightly disturbing juxtaposition was an underground viral hit at comic book conventions, and bootlegged copies were passed around and traded on VHS tape. Graham’s work, which he called telejusting, differs in some respects from that of later media jammers in that it requires viewers to at least know, if not be a fan of, the original source material.

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Interview with David Lynch – Transcendental Meditation, “True Detective,” and More

"David Lynch (cropped edit)" by Sasha Kargaltsev - http://www.flickr.com/photos/kargaltsev/3603597312/. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

“David Lynch (cropped edit)” by Sasha Kargaltsev. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

The Daily Beast just ran an awesome interview with David Lynch. I’ve pulled some snippets here, but you should read the whole thing if you’re a Lynch fan!

via The Daily Beast:

I just saw your fantastic ALS Ice Bucket Challenge video.

[Laughs] Oh. Great trumpet playing, huh? I had to do two buckets because two people challenged me, so I thought it should have some music to it. And I’m agreat trumpet player. And for some reason, I wanted to nominate Vladimir Putin. He might want to take part in helping some people.

Were there some demons you were dealing with when you turned to TM? You started on Eraserhead in ’72, and I understand that was a very fraught production early on.

You don’t have to be in bad shape.

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Onscreen text messages at the movie theater?

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

There is no other place in the world that can ease my anxiety or release my troubled mind than the cinema. There’s something special about watching a film on a large screen with like minded movie-goers surrounding you. And while I doubt this newfangled idea will catch-on, it’s still irritating to think about. Though, and I have to admit, that I’m often more annoyed by the loud popcorn crunchers and rustling wrappers than I am by someone looking at their phone.

via The Hollywood Reporter:

Theaters in major Chinese cities have starting experimenting with “bullet screens” on which audiences can send text messages commenting on the film, which are then projected directly onto the screen.

If you’re sensitive to people using their cellphones during a movie, then going to the movie theater in China would be far from relaxing experience.

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Short Horror Film is Shot Entirely with iPhone 4s: La Boca Del Léon

unnamedThe Mouth of the Lion (La Boca Del Léon) is an interesting answer to the over-saturation of the “found footage” films that we’ve had to endure the past few years. It has that found footage feel, but is rendered in a relatively new way. The film also raises compelling questions about the whole “Skype exorcism” fad, you may or may not have heard about.

Personally, I’m still partial to widescreen films seen in the cinema. But, I always appreciate innovation and am a sucker for the horror genre. Enjoy.

NOTE: The film is roughly 5 minutes long.

via the Press Release:

“The Mouth of the Lion” (La Boca Del Léon) is a story directed by Alfonso García López Madrid and written by Vincent Blonde Catalan under the production of the pop producer GEOFILMS ENTERTAINMENT. Inspired by the real exorcisms of Manual Vatican, the film tells the harrowing story of a father who is obsessed with the world of the dead. One of his macabre games has gone too far, so he decides to make one last call for help.

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“The Thing” – Storyboard to Film Comparison

If you haven’t figured it out through previous posts of mine, I’m fascinated by the ingenuity and brilliance of film directors and the people they work with. I’m biased, but I do think that film is by far the most challenging and rewarding of the arts. It’s one of the only art forms that can easily transcend societal barriers. The only other art I’d consider to have such an effect is music, but what’s unique about cinema is that it’s inclusive of all art forms. You will find that the fine arts, music, photography, and writing all play an integral role in the creation of a quality film.

thething1982-1

Still from the The Thing (1982)

Take for example, The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982). Artist Michael Ploog crafted two of the most visually stunning scenes via beautifully drawn storyboards. In the video below (thanks to Vashi Visuals), you can see the comparison between Ploog’s highly impressive drawings and the brilliant special effects and cinematography of the actual film.… Read the rest

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Kung Fu Movie Genre Inventor Run Run Shaw Dies At 106

run run shawVia the New York Times, pretty much all you could ask for in an eccentric billionaire movie mogul:

Run Run Shaw, the colorful Hong Kong media mogul whose name was synonymous with low-budget Chinese action and horror films — and especially with the wildly successful kung fu genre, which he is largely credited with inventing — died on Tuesday at his home in Hong Kong. He was 106.

Born in China, Mr. Shaw and his older brother, Run Me, were movie pioneers in Asia. In 1924 Run Run and Run Me turned a play called “Man From Shensi” into their first film. In Hong Kong, Run Run Shaw created Shaw Movietown, a complex of studios and residential towers where his actors worked and lived.

Mr. Shaw enjoyed the zany glamour of the Asian media world he helped create. He presided over his companies from a garish Art Deco palace in Hong Kong, a cross between a Hollywood mansion and a Hans Christian Andersen cookie castle.

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