Tag Archives | Cinema

Alejandro Jodorowsky on El Topo sequel, Endless Poetry


“A medicine man shouldn’t be a saint. He should experience and feel all the ups and downs, the despair and the joy, the magic and the reality, the courage and fear of his people…You have to be God and the devil, both of them. Being a good medicine man means experiencing life in all its phases. It means not being afraid of cutting up and playing the fool now and then. That’s sacred too.”

— Alejandro Jodorowsky from Psychomagic

I had my mind utterly melted by the twisted genius of Alejandro Jodorowsky after watching his cinematic masterpieces, El Topo and The Holy Mountain. These experiences permanently stained my soul at the tender age of 18.

It’s always been my dream to personally speak with the mad wizard mind behind the amazing experimental comics like The IncalMegalexMetabarons, Technopriests, and more recently Royal Blood, especially as an indie comics creator myself who is always on the lookout for new creator owned titles in the medium.… Read the rest

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The First Horror Film: George Méliès’ The Manor of the Devil (1896)

George Méliès, the preeminent cinemagician, gave us the world’s first horror (and vampire) movie, “Le Manoir du Diable.”

The film was actually presumed lost until 1988, when a copy was found in the New Zealand Film Archive.

Via YouTube:

The Haunted Castle (French: Le Manoir du Diable which means “The Manor of the Devil”) is a 1896 three-minute-long French film by Georges Méliès and number 78-80 on the Star Films catalog. The film contained many traditional pantomime elements and was intentionally meant to amuse people, rather than frighten them. Nonetheless, it is considered by many to be the first horror film, as well as the first vampire film.

h/t Open Culture.

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Why are stoners always portrayed the same in film?

Still from "Dazed and Confused"

Still from “Dazed and Confused”

Over at Dazed Digital, Charlie Graham-Dixon explores the “stoner” stereotype that’s heavily reinforced in cinema.

via Dazed Digital:

You guys, entrenched perceptions around weed are changing. Via seven short films and one feature-length documentary, The New York City Cannabis Film Festival aimed to showcase “entertaining and educational films about cannabis that further transform, stimulate, change, and share the expanding horizons of cannabis culture in the city of New York.”

Weed and movies have always been inextricably linked. From bombastically OTT anti-drug propaganda films like Reefer Madness (1938) and Assassin of Youth (1937)  through to modern day rehashes (geddit?) of stoner comedies like Pineapple Express (2008) and the Friday films – Hollywood has proven its fascination with getting high. And as American attitudes towards weed have fluctuated from shrieking negativity to shoulder-shrugging acceptance, so too has Hollywood, the lightning rod of America’s preoccupations and anxieties.

For many, the bond between film watching and smoking is strong.

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A Short Vision (1956)

This short animated film is Peter and Joan Foldes’ second and last film together. Its bleak subject – the end of the world caused by a nuclear apocalypse – reflects a widespread preoccupation in 50s Britain which would soon lead to the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND). The film is composed mostly of still drawings, creating a terrifying effect amplified by a sombre commentary spoken in the style of the Bible. The film had a very strong impact on audiences, in particular across the Atlantic, where it was shown on primetime television to millions of American viewers and reportedly produced one of the biggest reactions since Orson Welles’ ‘War of the Worlds’ broadcast in 1938. (Christophe Dupin)

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How the magic of cinema unlocked one man’s coma-bound world

Nikkormat FT3-Cinestill 800
This article originally appeared on MindHacks.com.

An Alfred Hitchcock film helped to prove one patient had been conscious while in a coma-like state for 16 years. The discovery shows that neuroscience may still have lots to learn from the ancient art of storytelling, says Tom Stafford.

If brain injury steals your consciousness then you are in a coma: we all know that. What is less well known is that there exist neighbouring states to the coma, in which victims keep their eyes open, but show no signs of consciousness. The vegetative state, or ‘unresponsive wakefulness syndrome’, is one in which the patient may appear to be awake, and even goes to sleep at times, but otherwise shows no reaction to the world. Patients who do inconsistently respond, such as by flinching when their name is called, or following a bright object with their eyes, are classified as in a ‘minimally conscious state’.… Read the rest

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Esoteric Symbolism and Hidden Meaning Uncovered in the Matrix Film

Jay Dyer via Waking Times:

The Matrix, as I’ve joked many times, is one of those perennial topics in philosophy 101 classes that tends to evoke the most inane and mindless “philosophizing” by the mind-warped morass of modern morlocks. Yet still, it is a film that is packed with esoteric symbolism, philosophy, “predictive programming,” and all other manner of poppy culture engineering. In this analysis, we are going to go elucidate themes, motifs and symbols missed by other sites, as we consider one of the system’s principal works of self-flattery. Interestingly, of all films to analyze in the way sites like mine do, this the most obvious seems forgotten in the haze of the now umpteen hundred Eyes Wide Shut analyses.


The Matrix begins with a computerized image of the Warner Bros. logo, a phone ring, and a conversation between Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) and Cypher (Joe Pantoliano) about watching “him” (Neo, Keanu Reeves), and whether the line is secure.

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