Tag Archives | Cognitive

Is Early-Age Reading Developmentally Appropriate?

Activity_at_the_library6Marsha Lucas asks if introducing children to reading at an early age developmentally appropriate.

via Rewire Your Brain For Love:

Louise Bates Ames, PhD, a superstar in child development and the director of research at the world-renowned Gesell Institute of Child Development, stated that “a delay in reading instruction would be a preventative measure in avoiding nearly all reading failure.” Leapfrogging necessary cognitive developmental skills — and asking a young brain to do tasks for which it isn’t truly ready — is asking for trouble with learning.

The brains of young children aren’t yet developed enough to read without it costing them in the organization and “wiring” of their brain. The areas involved in language and reading aren’t fully online — and aren’t connected — until age seven or eight. If we’re teaching children to do tasks which their brains are not yet developed to do via the “normal” (and most efficient) pathways, the brain will stumble upon other, less efficient ways to accomplish the tasks — which lays down wiring in some funky ways — and can lead to later learning disabilities, including visual-processing deficits.

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Are We A Step Closer To Reading Minds?

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Photo: MethoxyRoxy (CC)

Glasgow University has begun to ‘decode’ brainwaves. If successful, researchers believe the findings could lead to brain-computer interface. BBC News reports:

Scientists believe they are a step closer to being able to read people’s minds after decoding human brainwaves.

Glasgow University researchers asked volunteers to identify different emotions on images of human faces.

They then measured the volunteers’ resulting brainwaves using a technique called electroencephalography (EEG).

Once researchers compared the answers to the brainwaves recorded, they were able to decode the type of information the brainwaves held relating to vision.

The research was carried out by the university’s institute of neuroscience and psychology.

Six volunteers were presented with images of people’s faces, displaying different emotions such as happiness, fear and surprise.

[Continues at BBC News]

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