Tag Archives | Comic Books

Chris Ware’s Rejected Cover For Fortune Magazine

Acclaimed-genius comic book artist Chris Ware was commissioned to do the cover for capitalist magazine Fortune‘s iconic “Fortune 500″ issue (a list of the 500 top companies). Media Bistro reports that the finished result was rejected; upon inspection with a magnifying glass, it’s easy to see why.

Viewing the hi-res version reveals a multitude of subversive tiny figures including  CEO’s dancing a jig on top of the number “500,” China dumping money into the ocean, houses sinking nearby, orange-clad Guantanamo prisoners, and Mexican workers sitting in a “Fabrica de Exploitacion” center. It was all a bit too much for Fortune to handle.

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‘Our Gods Wear Spandex’ Author Christopher Knowles on The Black Fridays

Our Gods Wear Spandex

The Black Fridays — Episode 11: Christoper Knowles

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CHRISTOPHER KNOWLES is on the show! We had an awesome time speaking with Chris on this episode. We talk about his Eagle Award winning book, Our Gods Wear Spandex: The Secret History of Comic Book Heroes, about the symbolism in Torchwood: Children of Earth, and about how ancient symbols permeate our modern day culture.

Chris also gave us an inside look into his newest project, The Secret History of Rock ‘n Roll.

You can (and must) check out more about Chris at his blog at www.secretsun.blogspot.com.

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Hypersigils Reconsidered

The InvisiblesVia Technoccult:
I’ve been thinking recently about Grant Morrison’s “hypersigil” concept, but considering as not an occult/magical practice, but as as a cybernetic phenomena. [...] The way I see it, the online persona, fictional self, or avatar one creates can create feedback loops to reinforce behaviors and perceptions and have a create significant “real world” changes in a person’s life over time. In the case of Grant Morrison, he was also shaping his persona in the letters column of The Invisibles, in interviews he gave, and his public persona at comic conventions.
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