Tag Archives | Comics

James Bond due back as ‘brutal, damaged’ spy in comic by Warren Ellis

James Bond 007 cover by Dom Reardon for Dynamite Comics

James Bond 007 cover by Dom Reardon for Dynamite Comics

Fans of Bond, James Bond have been let down repeatedly by the latter day post-Ian Fleming Bond novels. That may change, in graphic form as one of the comics world’s most talented writers, Warren Ellis (creator of one of my favorite graphic novels Transmetropolitan), takes on the 007 challenge, as reported in the Guardian:

Warren Ellis is promising to deliver the “original, brutal, damaged” James Bond of Ian Fleming’s novels in a new comic book series out later this year, the first in more than two decades.

Launching in November with a six-issue story arc called VARGR, the series will see 007 back in London after a “mission of vengeance” in Helsinki, where he takes on the workload of a fallen agent. “But something evil is moving through the back streets of the city, and sinister plans are being laid for Bond in Berlin,” said publisher Dynamite.

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Better Things – The Life and Choices of Jeffrey Catherine Jones

Jeff catherine jones

Who Was Jeffrey Catherine Jones?

Frank Frazetta once called Jones the “greatest living painter.”

Born in 1944, Jones first published a comic book in 1965 (Blazing Combat #1). Jones quickly grew to popularity within the art community and went on to paint “covers for books, including the Ace paperback editions of Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series and Andre Norton’s Postmarked the Stars, The Zero Stone, Uncharted Stars and many others. For a period during the early 1970s she also contributed illustrations to Ted White’s Fantastic. Jones drew many covers and short stories for a variety of comics publishers including DC Comics, Skywald Publications, and Warren but generally avoided the superhero genre.”

In 1998, Jones underwent hormone therapy. According to Steven Ringgenberg at The Comics Journal, “It’s now known from the artist’s personal writings that she had felt conflicted about her gender since childhood, always feeling a greater affinity for the fair sex than for her own maleness.Read the rest

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Betrayal, Freedom and Justice: Forces of Order, Why V Embraced Anarchy (excerpts from Alan Moore and David LLoyd’s ‘V for Vendetta’)

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V_for_vendettax

Without a doubt, if you were to ask any comic book aficionado to put together a top five comic book creators list, Alan Moore would be in every list. Some even consider him to be the greatest comic book writer of all time.

“When waiting for a train at London’s Victoria Station in 1984, Gaiman noticed a copy of Swamp Thing written by Alan Moore, and carefully read it. Moore’s fresh and vigorous approach to comics had such an impact on Gaiman that he would later write; ‘that was the final straw, what was left of my resistance crumbled. I proceeded to make regular and frequent visits to London’s Forbidden Planet shop to buy comics’.” – Neil Gaiman: Journalism, early writings, and literary influences

Neil Gaiman – 3 books that have changed my life

Alan Moore has touched many hearts, and his creation that has influenced more people than any other is his masterpiece ‘V for Vendetta’, which he co-created with David LLoyd.… Read the rest

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From the Pages of Barry Ween: What We Would All Like to Do and Say to the Minions of the Surveillance State

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barry_wee_8

Barry Ween is a fictional “10-year-old boy who secretly possesses the most powerful intellect on Earth”. His escapades are brilliantly depicted by Judd Winick in the pages of “The Adventures of Barry Ween, Boy Genius”.

Barry is a genius, and we’re not talking about the regular Einstein type of genius, or beyond belief Tesla genius, we’re talking about 350 I.Q. “by far the smartest organism on the planet” genius. We’re talking about “self-awareness-in-the-womb-smart” (click images to enlarge).

Being the smartest creature to ever walk this earth, he realizes early on that for his safety and the safety of those that he loves, he would have to remain hidden. After all, we all know what humanity is capable of once fear of the incomprehensible and the unknown takes hold.

His first few years were long and arduous but he withstood them, and at the age of 10 he acquired enough freedom to explore the limits of science and understanding, albeit, still in secret.

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Happy Saturnalia To All!

SaturnaliaA celebration dear to the hearts of the Disinformation team at this time of year is Saturnalia, one of the most popular Roman festivals. It was marked by tomfoolery and reversal of social roles, in which slaves and masters ostensibly switched places, with expectantly humorous results. Saturnalia was introduced around 217 BC to raise citizen morale after a crushing military defeat. Originally celebrated for a day, on December 17th, its popularity saw it grow until it became a week-long extravaganza, ending on the 23rd. Our favorite exposition of Saturnalia has long been the Electric Sheep comic strip, no longer easily available on the web, but we dug in the crates and are pleased to bring it to you. We did find it here and in a video created from the original website posted to Funny or Die:
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Scott McCloud’s Four Types of Artists

artquadHere’s a fun scheme of classifying different types of artists. The scheme is Scott McCloud’s, mapped onto Ken Wilber’s quadrants. Can you think of any more examples?

From FC Student Blog:

In his book, Making Comics, Scott McCloud created a chart categorizing artists according to four intentions — what artists are most interested in, in creating art. His categories are:

  • Formalist — The Formalist is interested in examining the boundaries of an art form, stretching them, exploring what the form is capable of. The Formalist is interested in experimenting, turning the form upside-down and inside-out, moving in new, bold, untried directions, inventing and innovating. Formalists are the cutting edge, the avant-garde, the ones willing to break tradition and established ways. Strict narrative or craft is not as important as trying something new and unexpected, playing with and breaking traditional concepts, getting to the heart of understanding what art itself is.
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