Comics


Solar Death RayWhat a great hobby for the budding comic book super-villain. Could Lex Luthor do this in his youth? Nice work. Via Eric Jacqmain’s YouTube:

The R5800 is my latest and greatest solar creation. Made from an ordinary fiberglass satellite dish, it is covered in about 5800 3/8″ (~1 cm) mirror tiles. When properly aligned, it can generate a spot the size of a dime with an intensity of 5000 times normal daylight. This intensity of light is more than enough to melt steel, vaporize aluminum, boil concrete, turn dirt into lava, and obliterate any organic material in an instant. It stands at 5’9″ and is 42″ across.




A dorky but effective way to fight crime? A Seattle-area man was being carjacked when a local “superhero” named Phoenix Jones intervened to chase off the criminal. Jones is a part of a crime-fighting unit called the Rain City Superheros and keeps his true identity hidden, transforming into his alter-ego each night in the back of a comic store.


From Comics Alliance: “Another day, another racist freakout over non-white superheroes. But unlike the hilariously dishonest racism we saw when the Council of Conservative Citizens called for a boycott of Marvel’s Thor…




A new R. Crumb interview is a rare thing indeed. Enjoy his telephone conversation with Deborah Vankin of the LA Times, interspersed with background yells from his wife, Aline Kominsky-Crumb: DV: What…


Morrison at disinfo.con New York

Grant Morrison, comics legend and star of the legendary disinfo.con (view clip here), has conquered the world of comics but has yet to crack Hollywood. He’s now writing the screenplay for a live-action independent movie, ‘Sinatoro,’ with director Adam Egypt Mortimer. They tell MTV News‘ Rick Marshall about the project:

MTV NEWS: First off, tell me about the poster image you released for “Sinatoro” during Comic-Con — the one with the astronaut in the middle of the desert and the blackish cloud pouring out his faceplate. Given how little we know about the project, what are you hoping to convey about the film with that image?

sinatoro

GRANT MORRISON: Well, I wanted it to say that we’re dealing with classic material, the American myth, the idea of the road movie and the notion that the road can take you anywhere and adventures can happen. That’s always been at the very basic root of the American imagination. We wanted to show that, and of course it had to be Route 66, which is the daddy of all roads. The idea of the astronaut was to kind of suggest that our character was somewhere that looks familiar, but it’s not really familiar — it’s a place that will be familiar to all of us one day — but he’s kind of an explorer in another land. There’s an actual astronaut in the story, so it kind refers to him a little, but it’s mostly the notion of being an alien on your own planet, and in your own environment…



Editorial cartoonist Ward Sutton gave the Boston Globe‘s comics page a tea-party-friendly makeover; “There’s a growing concern among a certain segment of the country that the comics page is out of step…





Here’s a fairly insane marketing effort by Universal Pictures for their upcoming Scott Pilgrim vs. the World. Created in a 8-bit video game style, this “I-trailer” has commentaries, videos, making of footage and other stuff that usually is included in the DVD extras or commentary. (Click the image below for the trailer.)

Scott Pilgrim

Perhaps interactive trailers will become as commonplace as 3D has become for big budget films … coming off the buzz this film had a Comic Con, they certainly have kicked it up a notch.





Leave it to Alan Moore, subject of the disinformation documentary The Mindscape of Alan Moore, to go against the grain with his latest project, a tribute of sorts to another British comics pioneer, the unrelated Steve Moore. David Itzkoff interviewed Moore for the New York Times:

Typically, the appearance of Alan Moore’s name on a comic book has been a harbinger of heady, consequential writing inside: a promise of mighty champions empowered through mystical or superscientific methods and whose conflicts would challenge the reader’s perceptions of heroism and humanity.

So perhaps the first indication that “Unearthing,” a new work by Mr. Moore, is not typical of his pioneering graphic novels, like “Watchmen” and “V for Vendetta,” is that its subject is not a costumed adventurer, but a friend and fellow comics writer named Steve Moore, who inspired him to enter the business.

The second sign is that “Unearthing” is not a comic book at all, but a lengthy spoken-word recording accompanied by an atmospheric musical soundtrack and a book of photographs…


Some of CNN‘s iReporters are saying that Comic-Con just isn’t for the geeks anymore: What is seen by some as the holy four-day weekend for geek culture at San Diego Comic-Con has…





This is definitely in the “you can’t make this shit up” category, reported by Caleb Goellner for Comics Alliance: Yep. Marijuanaman. Reggae star Ziggy Marley, son of Bob Marley, is part of…