Tag Archives | Consciousness

The Lesser Banishing Ritual Of The Pentagram


Incredibly cool animated video about how to perform the lesser banishing ritual of the pentagram. Now, it should be noted that coming more from the school of Chaos Magick, I’ve never actually done any of the traditional ceremonial magick stuff but I might give it a try someday if I have time. I took the basic principles and designed my own inner fixation incantations that have more meaning to me in particular. Does this ritual work? I have no idea, give it a whirl and let me know. ‘Tis far more technical than any of mine. I normally repeat major key guitar riffs I’ve written in my head until I feel the waves of invading negativity have subsided.

Should be noted that I dove into magick not thinking there was a necessity to banishing rituals and found out pretty quick that there absolutely is. In fact, if I was ever going to give advice to any aspiring mage, the first thing I’d tell them would be: make sure you come up with a good banishing ritual.… Read the rest

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Don’t Trust Your Feelings: Somatics and the Pre/Trans Fallacy

roottree

A great article applying the pre/trans fallacy to somatics and body-work. Steve Bearman brings some much-needed balance to the alternative healing field.

via Interchange Counseling:

It’s easy for counselors, and the people we counsel, to get stuck in our heads. Counseling as we know it originated as “the talking cure”. Over the generations, counselors have discovered how to use dialogue as a powerful medium for facilitating change in our clients. Even at its best, however, conversation can only get us so far. We are more than mere talking heads.

In a tradition that has long been top-heavy, the growing prevalence of somatics has brought counseling back into balance, adding much-needed weight to the body’s role in healing and growth. “Soma” is the body, and body-oriented work takes us places talking never can, but just like mind-oriented work, it has significant limitations.

For those of us in the world of counseling who strive to live fully embodied lives, somatics has seemed like such a godsend that we can fail to recognize its limits.

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What It’s Like To Live As A Dead Person

cotard's syndrome

From New Scientist, what it’s like to live with the constant, crushing realization that you are dead:

Nine years ago, Graham woke up and discovered he was dead. He was in the grip of Cotard’s syndrome. People with this rare condition believe that they, or parts of their body, no longer exist.

For Graham, it was his brain that was dead, and he believed that he had killed it. Suffering from severe depression, he had tried to commit suicide by taking an electrical appliance with him into the bath.

“When I was in hospital I kept on telling them that the tablets weren’t going to do me any good ’cause my brain was dead. I lost my sense of smell and taste. I didn’t need to eat, or speak, or do anything…everything was meaningless.”

Neurologist Adam Zeman said, “He felt he was in a limbo state caught between life and death.”

Some people with Cotard’s have reportedly died of starvation, believing they no longer needed to eat.

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The Fear of Death is Killing Us

sexanddeathservitorThere are a lot of utterly insane laws enforced throughout the world, but one of the absolute craziest involves the illegality of assisted suicide. That’s right, even if you are being ravaged by a debilitating disease and your life has devolved into absolute hell on earth, you’re legally required to suffer that hell. This is how nuts we are when it comes to spirituality. We threw Jack Kevorkian in fucking jail God help us all (or God Hates Us All if you’re going with the Slayer narrative).

As a spiritual person, I have exactly zero interest in living to be very old. As a matter of fact, I sort of think I was trying to kill myself with booze for most of my twenties but a guiding force prevented me from doing so. I’ve got things down here I’m supposed to accomplish apparently. The prison guards weren’t going to let me out so easily, especially on bad behavior.… Read the rest

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5 Ways We Are Isolated From Each Other And Cut Off From Our Roots

dd395-gamePredators must have knowledge about their prey if they are going to be successful hunters.  It is clear that we have been studied and our weaknesses have been exploited in an effort to exhaust us economically, physically and spiritually.  Renowned researcher, Alan Watt goes so far as to state that the perpetrators responsible for this ultimately want to destroy any sense of individuality in us whatsoever.

Regardless of who’s doing the aggression, we can see that there is a war on the individual as we are assaulted on many fronts and are losing our individuality to such an alarming degree, with such intensity and in such a rapid time, that it drastically reduces the likelihood that this is happening by accident.  It seems there are predators who are coercing us and creating an atmosphere ripe for the rotting of minds.  The identity of the predators, while crucial, is controversialhowever their actions leave scars that are less debatable and if we can agree on what those are, we can perhaps have an easier time building a consensus about what is happening in general and what we can do about it.  That said, it’s not very difficult to agree on what those scars are.  They’re in front of our faces all the time.… Read the rest

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Alan Moore and Psychogeography

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Alan Moore interviews are always worth reading. Here he discusses psychogeography as it applies to various of his works.

via Reasons I Do Not Dance:

What exactly, in your not unlimited understanding, is Psychogeography?

In its simplest form I understand psychogeography to be a straightforward acknowledgement that we, as human beings, embed aspects of our psyche…memories, associations, myth and folklore…in the landscape that surrounds us. On a deeper level, given that we do not have direct awareness of an objective reality but, rather, only have awareness of our own perceptions, it would seem to me that psychogeography is possibly the only kind of geography that we can actually inhabit.

What books and writers ignited your interest in psychogeography?

The author that first introduced me to the subject was the person I regard as being its contemporary master, namely Iain Sinclair, with his early work Lud Heat.

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Ten Obstacles to Sane Spirituality

EctoplasmicSnotJulian Walker wrote this excellent overview of New Age flakiness, and gives some corrective measures.

via Elephant Journal:

I am passionate about the relationships between three things:

> inquiry-based practices (yoga, meditation, bodywork and ecstatic dance happen to be my favorites)

> critical thinking (also called “viveka” in yogic parlance, or discriminating wisdom)

> and shadow work (after Jung – the psychological idea that we have a “shadow” that is where we hide the emotions, experiences, thoughts and aspects of self that we would rather not face. Shadow work then is the process of courageously turning inward to bring honest awareness and compassionate attention to this place.)

Having been a yoga teacher for the last 18 years, and having spent my adult life swimming in the waters of popular spirituality, my sense is that more often than not these three elements are missing both in theory and practice. My sense is that this comes down to one revelatory observation.

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Don’t Fool Yourself: The Legalization of Marijuana Will Absolutely Lead to More People Smoking Pot

debacle1

One of the strangest things about being an enthusiastic pot smoker is that you constantly meet people who aren’t high all the time, which often leaves you wondering “What the fuck is wrong with these people?” I have no idea, but what I do know is that pot’s illegality absolutely influences this decision for most of them, often subconsciously. Don’t believe me? The second legalization passed in Washington, members on every side of my wife and my family were all of a sudden looking for a hook up. Christmas shopping was super easy. I got weed for nearly everyone, because that’s what they fucking asked for. I’m not joking. Some of these people haven’t smoked in years.

Because of the drug war, pretty much everything said about recreational drugs publicly is essentially insane. About the biggest argument conservative types can come up with against loosening weed laws has always been, but, if we legalize marijuana, more people will smoke it.… Read the rest

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Materialism is a Prison

rainbowpentagramservitor2At some point we’re going to have to acknowledge that scientific reductionism as we practice it is no longer an adequate means of explaining reality. In fact, it’s actually sort of becoming a threat to the entire psychic eco system. There’s nowhere to turn but in my friends, but I don’t see a whole fuck of a lot of that sentiment going mainstream anytime soon. People love to shop for useless crap, but when do we start addressing issues of quality over quantity in regards to human consciousness? Where did this expansionary agenda of rampant breeding stem from in the first place? Why exactly did we feel the need to procreate out of control so rapidly? The answer lies in materialist philosophy, quite possibly implanted into our collective brainstems from afar like a catalyst. If you only believe in outwardly repeatable phenomenon, you’re probably ignoring the vast majority of your inner life.… Read the rest

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A Sense Of Being Watched Is Hardwired Into Our Brains, Say Researchers

brain sense of being watchedIf when in doubt, we tend to feel that eyes must be upon us, could this help explain much of our behavior? From belief in a god staring down at us, to paranoid fantasies, to reluctance to break social norms even when no one is actually paying attention? Via the Telegraph:

The feeling that others are watching us is an evolutionary mechanism designed to keep us alert, experts said.

Prof. Colin Clifford, a University of Sydney psychologist who led the research, explained: “A direct gaze can signal dominance or a threat, and if you perceive something as a threat you would not want to miss it. Simply assuming another person is looking at you may be the safest strategy.”

The researchers asked volunteers to determine in which direction a series of faces were looking. Even without being able to clearly see where the eyes were focused, the participants felt as if they were being watched.

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