Tag Archives | Controversy

The Clash of the Shakespeareans

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I tried to think of a fitting Shakespearean insult that would suit this, but I came up short. I did, however, find this fun Shakespeare Insulter.

via The Guardian:

Shakespeare wasn’t immune to throwing around the odd insult, penning some of the greatest put-downs in the history of the English language.

“Thine face is not worth sunburning”; “Thou art as fat as butter”; “You are as a candle, the better part burnt out”.

But now the Bard himself is at the centre of some distinctly colourful language after academics traded blows over the publication of a Shakespearean journal.

The row erupted when one professor submitted a paper in which he cited evidence that poems and plays attributed to the “man from Stratford” were in fact written by Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford.

The essay – intended for the Italian journal, Memoria di Shakespeare – was said to examine the case for the theory as well as “the conscious and unconscious psychological factors behind the taboo against openly discussing the authorship question”.

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Legal Scholar: Is Fluoridation an Illegitimate Human Experiment?

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NEW YORKSept. 3, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — “The cessation of all compulsory water fluoridation schemes should be the goal of all public health agencies, ethical lawmakers and informed citizens,” argues Rita Barnett-RoseChapman University Associate Law Professor, (online August 2014), reports the New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation (NYSCOF).

Evidence of fluoride’s harm is ignored, downplayed or not studied; benefits exaggerated and informed consent disregarded. “Claims that fluoridation is not mass medication are unpersuasive,” she writes.

After scientists disproved the 1945 theory assuming ingested fluoride was essential for healthy teeth, fluoridation promoters newly speculate, without evidence, that fluoridation benefits low-income children who have the most decay and least access to dental care – a problem that persists today despite 7 decades of fluoridation. In fact, dental socioeconomic disparities have increased.

The National Research Council acknowledges significant fluoride health research has yet to be done – especially fluoride’s effect on the young brain.… Read the rest

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Air New Zealand Reprimanded Over Sexist Safety Video

As a frequent flier, I’ve become accustomed to tuning out the boring, rehashed safety demonstrations. I know I’m not the only one, as it only takes a quick glance around to see people with their heads bowed pouring over their books, people staring out the round windows, and others resting their tired eyes with head in hand. Apparently Air New Zealand also noticed this plight and teamed up with Sports Illustrated to make a more “exciting” safety video with bikini clad models.

Unfortunately everyone involved failed to consider how these sexed up, objectified beauties would be received by the female population.

Regardless of the objectification criticism, the entire video is weirdly cringe-worthy and awkward. Why are you giving me that flirty smile when telling me to obey illuminated signs? Odd.

From NBC News:

The video immediately sparked online outrage, with Natasha Young of Australia among the most notable after starting an online petition calling for its removal and saying the video was “an excuse to objectify the sexualised female body.” The petition sparked outcry on Twitter with the hashtag #AirNZsexism and attracted more than 11,000 signatures.

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Controversial Idea is too Dangerous for Festival of Dangerous Ideas

festival-of-dangerous-ideas_logoIn a weirdly ironic twist, The Sydney Opera House has cancelled speaker Uthman Badar’s talk “Honour killings are morally justified.”

In a statement the Opera House appeared to blame the talk’s title for giving the ‘wrong impression’, while announcing that it had decided not to proceed with the session.

‘The Festival of Dangerous Ideas is intended to be a provocation to thought and discussion, rather than simply a provocation,’ the Opera House wrote on Facebook.

‘It is always a matter of balance and judgement, and in this case a line has been crossed.’

‘It is clear from the public reaction that the title has given the wrong impression of what Mr Badar intended to discuss. Neither Mr Badar, the St James Ethics Centre, nor Sydney Opera House in any way advocates honour killings or condones any form of violence against women.’

Mr Badar told Fairfax Media on Tuesday that the session’s cancellation is revealing of the extent and influence of Islamophobia in Australia.

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Sacred Geometry with Randall Carlson &Vinny Eastwood

Via SacredGeometryInternational.com

Vinny’s NUTShell:

The ancient world and culture is a very interesting topic indeed, how exactly did the ancient peoples of the earth have such precise knowledge about celestial movements, geometry, measuring, time keeping and architecture?

It seems many practices and understandings are now being rediscovered in our time and it might be the very key we need to understanding our own past and predicting future events. Climate Change looking back to the dawn of man through till today appears to be a natural phenomenon with great climatic catastrophic events dotted throughout ancient and modern history alike. The conclusion being that human kind is in fact the enemy as a political excuse to install a world government for the benefits of international bankers and communist dictator wannabes.

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The Divine Farce

Joseph Grosso writes at Counterpunch:

If the recent report from the Italian newspaper La Repubblica is true than it turns out that the first Pope to resign his post in almost six hundred years did so, at least in part, due to the existence of a faction of gay Vatican officials being blackmailed by outsiders of a ‘worldly influence’. This sordid affair apparently emerged from an investigation by a three Cardinal team that Pope Benedict XVI set up to look into the leaking of documents by the Pope’s own butler, Paolo Gabriele, who saw leaking the Pope’s personal correspondence to an investigative journalist as a noble act meant to spur reform in an organization dominated by infighting and corruption.

Just last month tourists visiting the shops inside the Vatican were prevented from using credit cards to buy tickets and souvenirs after the Bank of Italy found that the Vatican Bank’s safeguards against money laundering do not meet international standards.

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Jennifer Van Bergen: Why Julian Assange is My Hero

At RedRoom, author Jennifer Van Bergen offers a powerful defense of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange as a hero and global speaker of truth to power:

But what Assange has done is not to blow the whistle on wrong-doing. He isn’t a vulnerable insider speaking out on the wrongs of his masters (like Bradley Manning, the man who is accused of leaking tens of thousands of pages of classified material to Wikileaks). What Assange has done — is doing — is to act as a witness, to be the seeing eyes from a safe distance. Assange understands the need to protect his independence from both the sources who supply material to Wikileaks and from the power abusers whose abuses the material reveals. He is the one whose eyes form a barrier between the abuser and his victim and consequently break the abuser’s hold and undo his power.

Assange’s critics fail to understand what Assange is doing.

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The Return of Scientific Racism

Picture: Library of Congress (PD)

Zach Musgrave writes at sleptlate.org:

“Scientific racism” is a slur in the academy, roughly analogous to calling something “psuedoscientific” in the mainstream scientific community. Largely because there are observed differences in the results of IQ tests of different races, it is politically correct in many academic circles to refer to general intelligence under the euphemism “whatever it is that IQ tests measure.”

And, in fact, it’s solid science that performance on such tests is strongly influenced by individuals’ own perceptions of their ability. Blacks taking a test that is presented as a “laboratory exercise” outperform those taking the same test presented as an exam. In Predictably Irrational, Dan Ariely relates an even more intriguing experimental result. Researchers seeking to understand the effect that stereotypes have on math test performance decided to see if they could study the interaction between two conflicting stereotypes: that Asians are good at math; and that women are bad at it.

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When You Should Shoot a Cop

Larken Rose at CopBlock.org:
That question, even without an answer, makes most “law-abiding taxpayers” go into knee-jerk conniptions.The indoctrinated masses all race to see who can be first, and loudest, to proclaim that it is NEVER okay to forcibly resist “law enforcement.” In doing so, they also inadvertently demonstrate why so much of human history has been plagued by tyranny and oppression. In an ideal world, cops would do nothing except protect people from thieves and attackers, in which case shooting a cop would never be justified. In the real world, however, far more injustice, violence, torture, theft, and outright murder has been committed IN THE NAME of “law enforcement,” than has been committed in spite of it.
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Lick Jesus With Christian Popsicles

Courtesy Sebastian Errazuriz

Courtesy Sebastian Errazuriz

If you’re an artist there’s one thing sure to land you lots of publicity and notoriety: art that offends Christians. The latest is Chilean Sebastian Errazuriz, whose popsicle art is currently shaking up New York. Eliott C. McLaughlin reports for CNN:

Sebastian Errazuriz has used art to take on an array of issues: New York’s death rate, the Occupy movement, military suicide, children with disabilities, the brutal reign of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Now, the Brooklyn-based artist is taking aim at what he sees as religious extremism.

At a party this weekend celebrating New York Design Week, which begins today, the Chilean-born artist plans to hand out 100 “Christian Popsicles” made of “frozen holy wine transformed into the blood of Christ” and featuring a crucifix instead the tongue depressor that typically hosts the frozen treats, he said.

An image of Jesus Christ positioned traditionally on the cross is visible once the ice pop is consumed.

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