Tag Archives | Copyright

Chicago Woman Could Get 3 Years for Taping 3 Minutes of ‘Twilight: New Moon’

NewMoonDAN ROZEK reports in the Chicago Sun-Times:

Taping three minutes of “Twilight: New Moon” during a visit to a Rosemont movie theater landed Samantha Tumpach in a jail cell for two nights.

Now, the 22-year-old Chicago woman faces up to three years in prison after being charged with a rarely invoked felony designed to prevent movie patrons from recording hot new movies and selling bootleg copies.

But Tumpach insisted Wednesday that’s not what she was doing — she was actually taping parts of her sister’s surprise birthday party celebrated at the Muvico Theater in Rosemont.

While she acknowledged there are short bits of the movie on her digital camera, there are other images that have nothing to do with the new film — including she and a few other family members singing “Happy Birthday” to her 29-year-old sister at the theater.

“It was a big thing over nothing,” Tumpach said of her Saturday afternoon arrest.

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Secret Copyright Treaty Threatens Internet Freedom

From Boing Boing via Bytestyle.tv: The internet chapter of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, a secret copyright treaty whose text Obama's administration refused to disclose due to "national security" concerns, has leaked. It's bad. It says: * That ISPs have to proactively police copyright on user-contributed material. This means that it will be impossible to run a service like Flickr or YouTube or Blogger, since hiring enough lawyers to ensure that the mountain of material uploaded every second isn't infringing will exceed any hope of profitability. * That ISPs have to cut off the Internet access of accused copyright infringers or face liability. This means that your entire family could be denied to the internet -- and hence to civic participation, health information, education, communications, and their means of earning a living -- if one member is accused of copyright infringement, without access to a trial or counsel.
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Secret Copyright Treaty Leaks. It’s Bad, Very Bad

Many thanks to Cory Doctorow of BoingBoing for publicizing this. Certainly not change I can believe in:

The internet chapter of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, a secret copyright treaty whose text Obama’s administration refused to disclose due to “national security” concerns, has leaked. It’s bad. It says:

  • That ISPs have to proactively police copyright on user-contributed material. This means that it will be impossible to run a service like Flickr or YouTube or Blogger, since hiring enough lawyers to ensure that the mountain of material uploaded every second isn’t infringing will exceed any hope of profitability.
  • That ISPs have to cut off the Internet access of accused copyright infringers or face liability. This means that your entire family could be denied to the internet — and hence to civic participation, health information, education, communications, and their means of earning a living — if one member is accused of copyright infringement, without access to a trial or counsel.
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100 Years of Big Content Fearing Technology — In Its Own Words

This is a great article on ars technica from Nate Anderson:

It’s almost a truism in the tech world that copyright owners reflexively oppose new inventions that do (or might) disrupt existing business models. But how many techies actually know what rightsholders have said and written for the last hundred years on the subject?

The anxious rhetoric around new technology is really quite shocking in its vehemence, from claims that the player piano will destroy musical taste and the “national throat” to concerns that the VCR is like the “Boston strangler” to claims that only Hollywood’s premier content could make the DTV transition a success. Most of it turned out to be absurd hyperbole, but it’s interesting to see just how consistent the words and the fears remain across more than a century of innovation and a host of very different devices.

So here they are, in their own words—the copyright holders who demanded restrictions on player pianos, photocopiers, VCRs, home taping, DAT, MP3 players, Napster, the DVR, digital radio, and digital TV.

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Shepard Fairey Responds To The AP: Yes, I Lied. But It Was Still Fair Use.

ObamaHopeJason Kincaid writes on TechCrunch:

We reached out to Shepard Fairey about the AP’s release this evening claiming that he had admitted lying about which image he used as the source image for his iconic Hope poster. He sent us a response (reproduced below), which effectively confirms what the AP says.

Tonight’s admission focuses on the photo that Fairey originally claimed to use during his creation of the ‘Hope’ poster — he claimed to use an image other than the one the AP claims to own, and then lied and deleted evidence when he realized he was wrong. Both were taken at the same press event. The one Fairey originally said he used showed Obama next to George Clooney, the one he really used was a close-up. The AP has succeeded in character assassination (perhaps rightfully so given Fairey’s actions), but Fairey may still have a case arguing that his image is protected under fair use.

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Blow-Up Over Artist’s Blow-Up of Obama Stipple Drawing

ObamaArtDavid Kravets writes in Wired’s Threat Level:

Pablo Picasso once said, “Good artists copy, great artists steal.”

But Wall Street Journal illustrator Noli Novak says Spanish artist Jose Maria Cano engaged in outright plagiarism in producing a large painting that meticulously duplicates Novak’s stipple portrait of President Barack Obama, including the surrounding text that ran on the front page of the Journal last year.

Jose Maria Cano’s giant hand-painted copy of Noli Novak’s Obama drawing “He copied it dot by dot,” Novak said.

Cano, who could not be reached for comment, has produced an entire series of paintings copied from the Journal’s signature stipple portraiture — all of them several times larger than the newspaper clippings from which they’re derived.

In a Tuesday blog post accusing Cano of misappropriation, Novak wrote that the attorneys for the Journal — which owns the copyright to her original Obama drawing — are looking into the matter.

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Fair Use Copyright Advocates Go One Up On Joyce Estate Copyright Thugs

For all of you who are rooting for a more flexible and practical copyright law, this should be hailed as a significant victory, as reported by Andrew Albanese in Publishers Weekly:

In what Fair Use advocates this week hailed as a vindication for the rights of scholars to use copyrighted materials for critical works, the literary estate of James Joyce has agreed to pay $240,000 in legal fees to settle a copyright lawsuit sparked by what attorneys called “threats and intimidation” by Stephen James Joyce, in his efforts to deter author Carol Shloss from quoting Joyce family documents or works in her book and in a subsequent Web-based supplement. The settlement, attorneys say, suggests a rather novel concept: sometimes the best fair use defense is a good offense. “This case shows there are solutions to the problem Carol Shloss faced other than simple capitulation,” said Stanford Fair Use Project executive director Anthony Falzone, whose organization represented Schloss.

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A Remix Manifesto for Our New Copyright Czar

Jonathan Melber, Huffington Post:
President Obama just appointed Victoria A. Espinel to be the first U.S. copyright czar. The position sounds like one more unnecessary addition to Washington bureaucracy (and it probably will be), but Espinel actually has a real opportunity to help fix our profoundly broken copyright laws, which--rather than fostering creativity, as they were originally intended--now inhibit it at every turn.

Over the last century our copyright system has been co-opted by large corporations whose profit motives often conflict with the fundamental goals of copyright policy. Indeed, the job of copyright czar was created as part of yet another industry-approved intellectual-property law that ratchets up enforcement and strengthens copyright protection despite any real evidence that such measures are necessary, let alone desirable. (Full legislation here.)

If she hasn't seen it, the first thing Espinel should do is watch RiP: A remix manifesto, Brett Gaylor's superb documentary about the serious social and economic damage caused by our overly aggressive copyright regime.

The film makes its point by focusing on the culture surrounding remixes: those multimedia, digital mashups that exemplify expression in the internet age. Its central character is the popular musician Girl Talk (Gregg Gillis), a remix artist whose songs are made entirely from digitally manipulated samples of other songs. Gillis' instrument is his laptop. Given the history of music as one of influences, sampling and (analog) remixing, he doesn't see what he does as any different from what Led Zeppelin did when they took "You Need Love" by Muddy Waters and turned it into "Whole Lotta Love."

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