Tag Archives | corporal punishment

How to Discipline Your Children without Rewards or Punishment

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Discipline is necessary for children, but we need to teach them to self-discipline, not bribe them to be good. Emiliano, CC BY-SA

Might parenting be one of the reasons so many people grow up to be obedient worker/consumer/sheeple?  Rebecca English writes at the Conversation.

Rebecca English, Queensland University of Technology

Many parents are moving towards “gentle parenting”, where they choose not to use rewards (sticker charts, lollies, chocolates, TV time as “bribes”) and punishments (taking away “privileges”, time-out, smacking) to encourage good behaviour, but encourage good behaviour for the sake of doing the right thing.

Gentle parents argue that to offer rewards and punishments overrides a child’s natural inclination towards appropriate behaviour by teaching them to behave in certain ways purely to receive a reward, or to avoid punishment.

What is discipline?

For most people it would seem impossible to discipline without rewards and punishments. However, it depends on your understanding of “discipline”.

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Some Things Hugs Can’t Fix

ybs (CC BY 2.0)

ybs (CC BY 2.0)

via Duke Today:

A loving mom can’t overcome the anxiety and aggression caused by corporal punishment, and her otherwise warm demeanor may make it worse, according to research led by Duke University that was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology.

“If you believe that you can shake your children or slap them across the face and then smooth things over gradually by smothering them with love, you are mistaken,” wrote lead researcher Jennifer E. Lansford on the Child and Family Blog. Lansford is a research professor at the Social Science Research Institute at Duke University. “Being very warm with a child whom you hit in this manner rarely makes things better. It can make a child more, not less, anxious.”

The blog is a joint project of the Future of Children at Princeton University and the Applied Developmental Psychology Research Group at the University of Cambridge.

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Saudi Blogger Sentenced to 600 Lashes and Seven Years in Prison

Saudi-Editor-Raif-Badawi-620x513Saudi Arabia has sentenced blogger Raif Badawi to 600 lashes and seven years in prison for running a blog that the state says undermined the security of the country. He actually got off easy, if you can believe it:

Via BBC:

Mr Badawi was originally charged with apostasy, or abandonment of religion, a crime in Saudi Arabia that carries with it the death penalty.

Lawyer Waleed Abu Alkhair told the BBC that Mr Badawi, a father of three, had confirmed in court that he was a Muslim but told the judge “everyone has a choice to believe or not believe.”

He was convicted of the charges of setting up a website that undermines general security and of ridiculing religious figures.

The judge ordered that the 600 lashes be administered 150 at a time.

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Texas City Reinstates Corporal Punishment In Public Schools

punishment

If there’s one thing Texans love besides barbecue, it’s paddling their kids. From the Washington Post:

“There are times when maybe a good crack might not be a bad idea,” said Robert Pippin, a custom home builder who sports a goatee and cowboy boots. His son graduated from Temple schools several years ago.

Corporal punishment remains legal in 20 states, mostly in the South, but its use is diminishing. Ohio ended it last year, and a movement for a federal ban is afoot. Most school districts across the country banned paddling of students long ago. Texas sat that trend out.

But even by Texas standards, Temple is unusual. The city, a compact railroad hub of 60,000 people, banned the practice and then revived it at the demand of parents who longed for the orderly schools of yesteryear. Since paddling was brought back to the city’s 14 schools by a unanimous board vote in May, behavior at Temple’s single high school has changed dramatically.

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