Tag Archives | Cryptozoology

The Bigfoot Blimp

Just one more Bifgoot story y’all, via Reuters:

An Idaho scientist shrugging off skeptical fellow scholars in his quest for evidence of Bigfoot has turned his sights skyward, with plans to float a blimp over the U.S. mountain West in search of the mythic, ape-like creature.

Idaho State University has approved the unusual proposal of faculty member Jeffrey Meldrum, an anatomy and anthropology professor ridiculed by some peers for past research of a being whose existence is widely disputed by mainstream science.

Now Meldrum is seeking to raise $300,000-plus in private donations to build the remote-controlled dirigible, equip it with a thermal-imaging camera and send it aloft in hopes of catching an aerial glimpse of Bigfoot…

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The DisinfoCast with Matt Staggs: Lyle Blackburn, Author, “The Beast of Boggy Creek”

Photo Courtesy of Lyle Blackburn

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Lyle Blackburn is a writer, musician, and cryptid hunter from Texas. He has always been fascinated with legends, lore, and sighting reports of “real-life monsters,” and is the author of the acclaimed book, The Beast of Boggy Creek: The True Story of the Fouke Monster. During his research, Lyle has often explored the remote reaches of the southern U.S. in search of shadowy creatures said to inhabit the dense backwoods and swamplands of these areas. Lyle is also a staff writer and cryptozoology advisor to Rue Morgue magazine, one of the leading horror media publications in print today. His “Monstro Bizarro” blog is featured on the Rue Morgue website and his “Monstro Bizarro Presents” news column appears monthly in the magazine. In addition, Lyle is the founder and frontman for the rock band, Ghoultown. Since 1998, Ghoultown has released eight albums, toured extensively in both the U.S.… Read the rest

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Visiting The International Museum Of Cryptozoology

When I have children someday, our weekend afternoon trips will be to the other zoo. Atlas Obscura on your new favorite cultural institution, the Portland, Maine-based Cryptozoology Museum, which offers Bigfoot poop, among other attractions:

Loren Coleman started pursuing unusual, often inexplicable animals in 1960, and has since become one of the world’s foremost experts in the field of cryptozoology. The discipline, as defined by the master himself, “is the study of hidden or unknown animals. Zoological species that, to-date, remain unverified by science, such as Yetis, Bigfoot, Lake Monsters, and Sea Serpents, as well as hundreds of other yet-to-be-found animals (cryptids) worldwide. It also encompasses the study of animals of recent discovery, such as the coelacanth, okapi, megamouth shark, giant panda, and mountain gorilla.”

Coleman has amassed an unrivaled collection of specimens, replicas, and artifacts relating to famous and lesser-known cryptids, including the eight-and-a-half foot tall, 300-pound “Crookston Bigfoot,” a life-size coelacanth, P.

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Stick-swinging Bigfoot Footage from Ohio the Real Deal? Probably Not.

Cryptomundo recently posted the following video depicting a supposed Bigfoot encounter on a trail in Northeast Ohio. While I’m almost one hundred percent that the Sasquatch is a creature of myth, I am intrigued by the way that the video was set up. If you look carefully at the slowed down footage you’ll notice that the “creature” is carrying a large stick. It would seem that if you were to go through all of the trouble to stage a Bigfoot encounter that you wouldn’t throw in an oddball detail like that. Then again, if you were especially clever, you might want to throw in the stick just to make people think just that.

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Making The Planet Strange

We don’t often plug crowdsourcing projects on disinformation, but Planet Weird is one movie we’d like to see. The filmmakers, led by Who Forted‘s Greg Newkirk, have already met their modest funding goal, but the more money they raise, the better the film will be. You can check out their page at IndieGogo; this is the trailer:

… and this is their description:

Have you ever been curious as to why things go bump in the night instead of the day…

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Hunting the Basilisk: The Historical Record of a Mythical Beast

There’s an interesting story at The Smithsonian’s Past Imperfect blog regarding the peculiar history of the mythological basilisk. Those of you who spent your teenage years playing Dungeons & Dragons in your basement might already know what a basilisk is. However, for the rest of you, here’s a description:

The basilisk remained an object of terror long after the collapse of the Roman empire and was popular in medieval bestiaries. It was in this period that a great deal of additional myth grew up around it. It became less a serpent than a mix of snake and rooster; it was almost literally hellish. Jan Bondeson notes that the monster was “the subject of a lengthy discourse in the early-13th-century bestiary of Pierre de Beauvais. An aged cock, which had lost its virility, would sometimes lay a small, abnormal egg. If this egg is laid in a dunghill and hatched by a toad, a misshapen creature, with the upper body of a rooster, bat-like wings, and the tail of a snake will come forth.

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Thirty-Five Years of (T)error: Revisiting the Dover Demon

Image credit Bill Bartlett

Via Cryptomundo:

Blogger Tony Morrill has written a comprehensive overview of the Massachusetts cryptid known only as the “Dover Demon”. The first sighting of the pallid, melon-shaped humanoid creature took place in 1977, and although there haven’t been any recent reported sightings, it remains a popular topic of debate – at least among some people:

“It was not a dog or a cat. It had no tail. It had an egg-shaped head. It looked like a baby’s body with long arms and legs. It had a big head about the same size as the body, it was sort of melon shaped. The color of it was… the color of people in the Sunday comics.”

I can’t help but to notice that the description sounds very similar to the “Grey aliens” that UFO abductees describe from time to time. That being said, some people think that it might have been a young moose.… Read the rest

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Committee for Scientific Inquiry on Chinese Ape-Men

The Committee for Scientific Inquiry has a great article about the hunt for the Yeren, the Chinese ape-man, including a humorous anecdote in which a hirsute westerner is mistaken for the legendary beast:

Some have suggested that the wild man is some human throwback—neither Giganto­pithecus nor Peking Man surely but possibly some oddity like those sometimes exhibited in carnival sideshows (Nickell 2005, 150–58, 202–208). A “monkey baby,” for instance, that lived in Xhin Xhan County of Hubei Province, was simply an unfortunate individual with genetic deficiencies who “walked with a shuffling gait, had a slouched back, had a low misshapen forehead, could only make sounds with no articulate speech, and grinned constantly” (Poirier et al. 1983, 30). Yeren researcher Frank E. Poirier—only a normally hairy westerner who is about five feet eleven inches tall—frightened some local children who “ran away horrified at their encounter with what they screamed to others was the Wildman in their midst” (Poirier et al.

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Paranormal Pioneer John Keel With Doug Skinner on The Disinfocast with Matt Staggs

Mothman Prophecies

Remembering Paranormal Pioneer John Keel With Doug Skinner | The Disinfocast with Matt Staggs: Episode 04

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In this episode of The Disinfocast, we discuss the late John Alva Keel. He is best remembered as the author of The Mothman Prophecies, a classic work of Fortean reportage. The book painted an eery portrait of a tiny town besieged by inexplicable incidents: sightings of a moth-like creature with glowing red eyes, strange lights in the sky and midnight visits from men in black. Keel began his investigation as an outsider, but was soon drawn into the dark orbit of the mothman.

Keel achieved some amount of public recognition when his book became the basis of a 2002 movie of the same name starring Richard Gere, but the public at large had no idea that Keel’s encounter with the mothman was only one small part of an incredibly strange, adventurous life. Keel, a veteran writer of the weird, was well-known within the ranks of forteana for his writings on UFOs, conspiracies and strange mysteries discovered in the furthest corners of the globe.

Keel’s later years were tough ones. As he grew older, his career suffered. So did his health. Thankfully, he was not completely alone. A small circle of friends and admirers stood by his side. One of them was Fortean writer and professional composer Doug Skinner. Skinner, a close friend of Keel’s, is here to talk with us on the latest episode of The Disinformation Company’s official podcast, The DisinfoCast.

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