Tag Archives | Dave Eggers

Summer of Surveillance: 1984 vs. The Circle

[Editor’s note: This post contains minor spoilers.]

In 1984, George Orwell presents a dystopian future in which citizens are under constant surveillance by the government, while records of the past are continuously edited and destroyed. The past becomes an abstract notion, ever shifting and strategic, and these manipulative tactics allow the ruling elite to maintain control. This is a closed system, through which pure information only flows in one direction before being heavily altered and then filtered back to the unsuspecting masses. With slogans like “WAR IS PEACE”, “FREEDOM IS SLAVERY”, and “IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH”, Orwell makes it quite clear that the rulers of this world mean business and will stop at nothing to ensure the continuation of their reign.

Three surveillance cameras on the corner of a building. By Hustvedt via Wikimedia Commons.

Three surveillance cameras on the corner of a building. By Hustvedt via Wikimedia Commons.

In The Circle, Dave Eggers presents an interesting contrast to Orwell’s dark and legendary vision.… Read the rest

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Dave Eggers, Newspaper Publisher?

David Ulin for the Los Angeles Times:

The novelist’s grand print experiment — $16 a copy — hits S.F. streets and beyond this week. It’s a one-shot deal, but he hopes it will remind people of the form’s potential and viability.

Reporting from San Francisco – Dave Eggers doesn’t look like a newspaper baron. At 39, wearing a baseball cap and hiking boots, the author — whose most recent project is the screenplay for “Where the Wild Things Are” — appears more an older brother to the interns who work feverishly in the Mission District offices of McSweeney’s, the independent publisher Eggers founded with the proceeds from his bestselling 2000 memoir, “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius.”

In addition to books and a monthly magazine, McSweeney’s publishes a literary journal, McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, the new issue of which is set to appear here today in a form that confounds every trend in publishing: a 300-plus-page Sunday-style broadsheet newspaper called the San Francisco Panorama, with which Eggers and company mean to celebrate the glory of the form.

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