Tag Archives | Declassified

Highlights From The U.K. Defense Ministry’s Classified UFO Files

ufo reportsThe Telegraph combs through for some of the weirdest reports of UFOs by the public from formerly confidential files in the National Archive:

  • A caller to MoD UFO hotline reports that he has been “living with an alien” in Carlisle for some time.
  • A Cardiff man claimed a UFO abducted his dog, car and tent whilst he was camping with friends.
  • A Coventry woman saw “two orange balls” hovering in her back garden in July 2008 after her Springer Spaniel “unusually ran back in”. Frightened by what she saw, she locked the door and reported her sighting to the UFO hotline, asking whether she and her pet could be contaminated as a result.
  • A man, now living in the Netherlands, asked for the return of a cinefilm he said he had passed to two investigators in 1978, showing a UFO flying over his back garden in Romford. He said he had showed them where the craft had landed, and that the men had taken soil samples.

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Project 1794 – The U.S. Air Force’s Supersonic Flying Saucer

Have you ever wanted to build your own Flying Saucer? Well now’s your chance!

Benjamin Plackett, reporting for Wired’s Danger Room, details the recently declassified saucer schematics from Project 1794:

“Newly declassified materials show the U.S. Air Force had a contract with a now-defunct Canadian company to build an aircraft unlike anything seen before. Project 1794 got as far as the initial rounds of product development and into prototype design. In a memo dating from 1956 the results from pre-prototype testing are summarized and reveal exactly what the developers had hoped to create.

The saucer was supposed to reach a top speed of “between Mach 3 and Mach 4, a ceiling of over 100,000 ft. and a maximum range with allowances of about 1,000 nautical miles,” according to the document.

If the plans had followed through to completion they would have created a saucer, which could spin through the Earth’s stratosphere at an average top speed of about 2,600 miles per hour.

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