Tag Archives | Design

15 Years Of Transparency

Kartell – 15 Years Of Transparency - from abstract groove on Vimeo.

15 years of Kartell transparency told through a surreal journey of light and plastic.

The protagonists: 7 icons of contemporary design.

From the lightness of La Marie to the success of Louis Ghost, all the way through to the majestic Uncle Jack (which marks yet another technological landmark for the company), the creative team at abstract:groove designed a visual path made of scenographic installations that come to life through simple creative clockworks, limiting the use of post-production to the bare minimum.

The actors in the film are extraordinary: their personality is shown through a clever use of lights, reflections and behaviours. The souls within the objects are animated by scenery and scenography, informed and mutated by the concept of “motion design”.

“Our main goal was to capture the soul of these objects through the relationship between light and plastic surfaces, trying to let them express as if they had a life of their own.”(Luigi Pane, abstract:groove creative director).

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The Wendy Carlos Multiphonic Keyboard And The Museum Of Imaginary Instruments

The altogether delightful Museum of Imaginary Instruments features not-quite-yet-real musical devices that hover at the boundaries of physical law and the human senses. Take, for instance, electronica pioneer Wendy Carlos’s dream keyboard of the new era:

Wendy Carlos is best known as a pioneer of the synthesizer who reached mass audiences with soundtrack for Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (1971). While never-before-heard timbres were a stunning feature of these works, Carlos also pursued another avenue opened up by synthesizers: the development of new tunings. Based on a design by R. H. M. Bosanquet from 1875, her proposed generalized keyboard divided the octave into 53 equal steps, strategically arranged so as to make all regular divisions of the octave playable. Carlos wrote. Alas, like the shift to meantone Carlos expected to see as digital synthesizing equipment became more common, the keyboard was not to be.

multiphonic keyboard

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Choosing An Autonomous Ethics System For Your Robot

In ten years, how will the machines that run your daily existence respond when confronted with life-or-death decisions? Matthieu Cherubini at the Royal College of Art offers prototypes of Humanist, Protector, and Profit-Based moral parameters for self-driving cars:
Many car manufacturers are projecting that by 2025 most cars will operate on driveless systems. How can such systems be designed to accommodate the complicatedness of ethical and moral reasoning? Just like choosing the color of a car, ethics can become a commodified feature in autonomous vehicles that one can buy, change, and repurchase, depending on personal taste. Three distinct algorithms have been created - each adhering to a specific ethical principle/behaviour set-up - and embedded into driverless virtual cars that are operating in a simulated environment, where they will be confronted with ethical dilemmas.
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Jean Perdrizet’s Metaphysical Blueprints From The Future

Art Brut / collection ABCD on the otherworldly creations of Jean Perdrizet, who designed languages, scales, and devices bridging the gap between the human world and the realms of ghosts, aliens, and astral planes:

Jean Perdrizet (1907-1975) was employed as a combat engineer in Grenoble, then at Électricité de France from 1944 to 1949. Around 1955 he became an “inventor”. He started to invent prototypes and draw plans of machines to communicate with the ghosts or aliens : an “electric ouija”, a “thermoelectronic net for the ghosts”, a “Robot cosmonaut”, “space scale”, an “imagination cursor”, a “flying pipe”. He also invented a universal language, the so-called “T language”. He sent his studies to NASA, CNRS and the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences. His work attracted the attention of scientists but also of those who refuse the omnipotence of rationalist thought.

jean Perdrizet

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NSA Chief’s “Information Dominance Center” Designed To Look Like Star Trek

ifWe are officially living in someone else’s fantasy. The Verge writes:

Foreign Policy describes NSA head Keith Alexander’s data-processing “Information Dominance Center” in Virginia as a high-tech homage to Star Trek.

Alexander reportedly had his operations center redesigned to mimic the Enterprise bridge, “complete with chrome panels, computer stations, a huge TV monitor on the forward wall, and doors that made a ‘whoosh’ sound when they slid open and closed.”

“The Center’s primary function is to enable 24-hour worldwide visualization, planning, and execution of coordinated information operations for the US Army and other federal agencies,” says a paper by designers DBI Architects. “The futuristic Commander’s console gives the illusion that one has boarded a star ship.”

The officials and lawmakers who were apparently treated to presentations at the center, however, seemed duly impressed. “Everybody wanted to sit in the chair at least once to pretend he was Jean-Luc Picard,” says an officer who helped coordinate the visits.

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The Alien Reproduction Vehicle Blueprints Of Mark McCandlish

mark mccandlish

OpenMinds on accomplished aerospace illustrator Mark McCandlish’s efforts to document and expose extraterrestrial flight technologies:

Mark McCandlish says information has been shared with him about an Alien Reproduction Vehicle built by the military using technology that has been back engineered from alien technology.

McCandlish says that in 1988 he and a friend were planning on attending an air show at Norton Air Force Base. McCandlish ended up having to cancel due to a last minute illustration needed by Popular Mechanics. However, his friend went and through a well connected acquaintance, was able to gain entrance to a secured area of the base with a special display for politicians and military personnel with high level security clearances.

In this display were three flying saucers floating above the ground. They made no sound. They made “hopping” maneuvers, and then could shoot straight up at incredible speeds. All while making no sound.

The craft were referred to as Alien Reproduction Vehicles (ARVs), and also had the nickname, the “Flux Liner.” McCandlish says he believes these are part of a secret program that has been around for decades.

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The Ideal Mental Hospital Designed Using LSD

Kiyoshi IzumiVia Motherboard, Brian Anderson explains how groundbreaking architect Kiyoshi Izumi employed LSD trips in order to create a more humane psyche ward:

Kiyoshi Izumi was part of a small, federally-granted team of visionaries tasked with developing a province-wide psychiatric hospital overhaul that addressed the affects that clinical environments had on patients. The trick? Get inside the heads of the mentally ill.

The success of the Saskatchewan Plan hinged on mimicking the psychomimetic experience. He’d have to conjure up not only hallucinations but also delusions and perceptual distortions distinct to psychoses. He’d have to eat acid.

It was a bold move. The insights he gleaned from levelling with patients and their surroundings, if we’re to take his word for it, found Izumi envisioning what’s gone on to be called “the ideal mental hospital”, the first of which was raised in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, in 1965.

To the untrained eye, Izumi’s final building likely appeared decidedly non psychedelic.

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ZXX: A Typeface To Resist Surveillance

zxxAvailable for free download, designer Sang Mun's ZXX fonts are examples of how to elude character-recognizing artificial intelligence in style:
During my service in the Korean military, I worked as special intelligence personnel for the NSA, learning first-hand how to extract information from defense targets. Now, as a designer, I am influenced by these experiences continue the evolution of my own thinking about censorship, surveillance, and a free society. Over the course of a year, I researched and created ZXX, a disruptive typeface that would be unreadable by text scanning software. It takes its name from the Library of Congress’ listing of three-letter codes denoting which language a book is written in. Code “ZXX” is used when there is: “No linguistic content; Not applicable.”
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Ben Falk of Whole Systems Design Talks About Modern Day Homesteading

Permaculture, homesteading, cold climate, and compost-powered heating in the Vermont hills from Olivier Asselin on Vimeo.

Ben Falk, M.A.L.D: Design, Planning, Systems Optimization
Ben developed Whole Systems Design, LLC as a land-based response to biological and cultural extinction and the increasing separation between people and elemental things. Life as a designer, builder, ecologist, tree-tender, and backcountry traveler continually informs Ben’s integrative approach to developing landscapes and buildings. His home landscape and the WSD studio site in Vermont’s Mad River Valley serve as a proving ground for the regenerative land developments featured in the projects of Whole Systems Design. Ben has studied architecture and landscape architecture at the graduate level and holds a master’s degree in land-use planning and design. He has conducted nearly 200 site development consultations across New England and facilitated dozens of courses on permaculture design, property selection, microclimate design, and design for climate change.

Nora Young of CBC Radio: Spark talks with Ben Falk the founder of Whole Systems Design.… Read the rest

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The Architectural-Utopia Desert Commune Of Arcosanti

arcosantiVisionary architect Paolo Soleri died in April at 93. His landmark work is the domed utopian village Arcosanti in Arizona, a communal, hippie-futurist "human laboratory" created in 1970, where hundreds of people still live with the purpose of developing new ways of physically organizing human life. ArchDaily writes:
Paolo Soleri spent a lifetime investigating how architecture, specifically the architecture of the city, could support the countless possibilities of human aspiration. The urban project he founded, Arcosanti, 65 miles north of Phoenix, was described by NEWSWEEK magazine as "the most important urban experiment undertaken in our lifetimes.”
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