Those pesky billionaires, Charles and David Koch, stretch their tentacles wherever their money is accepted, and it seems as though public television is no exception. Brian Stelter describes the unfortunate plight of…

On the 70th anniversary of the first intentional LSD trip, a compelling new documentary film about the academic study of psychedelic drugs is released. Psychedemia was the first academic conference funded by…

I’m overburdened with media! I’ve a pile of books to read, news to collate, new music to parse and podcasts to digest. My Netflix queue overfloweth. And if I ever get time to…

What happens when a thoroughly secular second-generation Indian-American decide to grow his hair and beard long, put on a robe and beads and present himself to spiritually lost Westerners as a Guru? Vikram Gandhi decided to find out. The results are funny, but more than a little heartbreaking. Arizona New Agers flock to his side, finding profundity in his every word and asking few to no questions about where the young spiritual teacher “Kumaré” they idolized came from and where he was taking them. Their insistence on interpreting his message of “illusion” as metaphor ultimately blinds them to the truth that he is telling them: He’s a fake, and that they don’t need a guru at all.

You can find Kumaré on Netflix Instant and a variety of other video streaming services now. Learn more about the film here.

Via orwellwasright.

Sometimes you watch something with a premise so implausible, so outrageous it has to be true. Some things remind you of the reality of the human condition: our willingness to accept and live lies; the ease with which we can be deceived and manipulated even when everything points to a con. It is hard to say whether this psychological trait is a product of gullibility and stupidity. Perhaps it is neither – perhaps it says more about our readiness to accept things at face value based on the assumption that people are basically decent and wouldn’t tell such obvious lies. More than a few people have found out the hard way the naïveté of this outlook, as the documentaries The Imposter and Catfish and the film based on a true story Compliance clearly show.

The Imposter is a textbook example of such a premise that, were it a work of fiction, you’d probably switch it off for being too far-fetched. Three years after the disappearance of 13 year old Texan Nicholas, he is found alive half way around the world in Spain. He tells a story of kidnap and torture and is returned to his family in the States, who appear to be oblivious to the increasing number of glaring inconsistencies with the son who disappeared and the teenager before them sporting stubble, a different appearance and a European accent. Their unquestioning acceptance of this rather obvious imposter is as notable as the audacity of the con itself.

In advance of my DisinfoCast interview with Adam Scorgie, I’d like to share his well-known documentary The Union: The Business Behind Getting High with our readers. Scorgie and company were kind enough to upload the full version to YouTube. Many of you may have seen this, but if not, get ready for an infuriating but enlightening look at the hypocrisy and ineffectiveness of the United States’ continuing prohibition against marijuana.

Filmed in more than twenty states, The House I Live In tells the stories of individuals at all levels of America’s War on Drugs. From the dealer to the narcotics officer, the inmate to the federal judge, the film offers a penetrating look inside America’s criminal justice system, revealing the profound human rights implications of U.S. drug policy. Winner of the 2012 Sundance Grand Jury Prize, The House I Live In will be released in theaters on October 5th.

What a turnaround – finally a right-wing activist documentary that people want to see, with no response from the left’s usual filmmaker suspects such as Michael Moore and Robert Greenwald. David Wright reports for ABC News:

It’s rare that a low-budget documentary becomes a genuine blockbuster, but conservative firebrand Dinesh D’Souza‘s controversial new film, “2016: Obama’s America,” is one of the hottest tickets at the box office right now.

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

“I’m overwhelmed,” D’Souza said. “This is my first venture into film territory.”

The film is now showing in more than 1,000 theaters, and that number is expected to double by Friday, which would put the movie’s release on par with a major Hollywood blockbuster. Last weekend, “2016” was already earning more money per screen than “The Bourne Legacy” and “The Expendables 2” — combined…

We don’t often plug crowdsourcing projects on disinformation, but Planet Weird is one movie we’d like to see. The filmmakers, led by Who Forted‘s Greg Newkirk, have already met their modest funding goal, but the more money they raise, the better the film will be. You can check out their page at IndieGogo; this is the trailer:

… and this is their description:

Have you ever been curious as to why things go bump in the night instead of the day…

Via Radio Wars:

Radio Wars focuses on the controversial history of satellite radio as it exposes the secret story behind the power struggles for radio dominance. Sirius and XM Satellite Radio were engaged in a heated entanglement before they became one company, and their mutual fight for survival against traditional radio, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) and Wall Street, is one of radio’s most epic battles. Radio Wars delves deep into SiriusXM’s conflict-ridden history, from its earliest days to its darkest hour, and questions the motives of those who seek to control radio’s content in the future.

Via The War On Kids:

The War on Kids is a documentary on Public Education in America. While several documentaries on schools have come out since The War on Kids, these films tend to be either propaganda for charter schools or look at symptoms without any appreciation or understanding of underlying issues. To be a great documentary, it is essential to do the necessary work and dig deeper to uncover the heart of the problems observed. The numerous failures and pathologies associated with school are predominantly due to it autocratic structure. Because no one wants to voluntarily relinquish power, this fundamental problem is never addressed or even recognized.

The post on the Christian horror movie Harmless made me think of this interesting documentary from 2001 of a small town setting up a “Hell House,” to warn people of the horrendous consequences of Sin:

Hell Houses are a distinctly American phenomenon which began in 1990 just outside of Dallas, at the Trinity Assembly of God Church. The original Hell House was conceived as a modern-day fire-and-brimstone sermon. Today, this religious ceremony of sorts is replete with actors, extensive lighting equipment and full audio-visual tech crews.

USCurrency_Federal_ReserveWhen money drives almost all activity on the planet, it’s essential that we understand it. Yet simple questions often get overlooked, questions like: Where does money come from? Who creates it? Who decides how it gets used? And what does this mean for the millions of ordinary people who suffer when the monetary, and financial system, breaks down? We have yet to see an election fought on these grounds and as political philosopher John Gray, commented, “We’re not moving to a world in which crises will never happen or will happen less and less. We are in a world in which they happen several times during a given human lifetime and I think that will continue to be the case”

People are waking up to this fact: the Occupy movement and the European indignados have erupted as a response to the current status quo. The media and ‘myth makers’, however, have found it much to easy to pigeonhole these movements into a “spiritual malaise” that provides no meaning or direction for our modern world. This is the response expected from a dominant neo-conservative economical world. This ever-adaptive financial system has been as such for centuries and those who can control it see no reason to steer a course elsewhere. Indeed the economics of emancipation can impart to us an interesting insight to the cyclical and prevailing nature of this economic paradigm…

Having produced a documentary about the Maya and their famous calendars, as well as published a related book, I feel I know the topic reasonably well. We certainly covered a massive range…