Tag Archives | Documentary

A Life Amongst Art

For over 50 years, Los Angeles resident Enrique Serrato has been building an impressive collection of American, Chicano and Mexican art that now exceeds 6000 pieces covering ceramics, paintings, sculpture and outsider art. Unlike the Vogels, Mr. Serrato kept his collection private for more than 35 years, and only recently opened his collection to a small group of Los Angeleno artists and collectors. Mr. Serrato lives in a two-bedroom apartment and surrounds himself with his ever-growing collection which has been called Los Angeles’ best kept secret. Filmed by Patrick Kennedy.

Watch part one of this fascinating documentary here:

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Alice Goes Gonzo

alice

This year we celebrate the sesquicentennial of Alice in Wonderland — a landmark of kid lit and a cornerstone of psychedelic fiction. This probably won’t be my last post about Alice.

As a fantasy for the wee, Alice inspires illustrations, and it’s assumed that Walt Disney owns that territory. Little did I know that Ralph Steadman’s pen had penetrated Wonderland, bringing his pointed probings to the gonzo goings-on in this important tale about growing up and growing small…

Here, Steadman is cast as Alice’s godfather, the wizard with the wisdom to will the wild out of his charge, pointing her past the mundane to the mirthful, the macabre, the miraculous. See a collection of Steadman’s 1973 images at Brainpickings. Also be sure to check out this exhaustive Steadman documentary, For No Good Reason

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Time is Art: A Conversation on Synchronicity, Creativity and the Unseen World

Via The Midwest Real Podcast

Unus mundus, Latin for “one world,” is the concept of an underlying unified reality from which everything emerges and to which everything returns.

Dip your toe into the well of woo once again with our guests Katy Walker and Joel Mejia, the main creative forces behind the film Time Is Art. “An artist’s search for inspiration in a money-driven society that shuns creativity, and the human search for meaning in a seemingly meaningless world. A cinematic meditation along the lines of Waking Life and Samsara… a film less concerned with linear storytelling and more open to cycle patterns, the hidden meanings of symbols and the dreamlike overlapping of people, places and moments.”

Time Is Art also features conversations with Alex Grey, Rupert Sheldrake, Graham Hancock and more.

chris-soria075 Prologue- Michael Rants About Synchronicity

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075- Time is Art

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Vice Interview About Porn Documentary

A few years ago, Rashida Jones, known for her roles in “The Office” (US) and “Parks and Recreation,” found herself embroiled in a debate concerning the pornification of culture, due to Twitter remarks she had made about pop musicians. The controversy and criticism opened the opportunity for her to create a documentary about the Miami porn industry.

“Over the past few years, she’s also ventured into writing and producing films, currently tackling projects like writing Toy Story 4. We had a chance to hang out with Rashida and talk about her shift behind the camera, and the documentary she recently produced on Miami’s amateur porn industry, ‘Hot Girls Wanted.'”

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Rajneeshpuram [Free Documentary]

In 1981, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, a spiritual leader from India, and thousands of his disciples, set out to build a new city, a utopian community in the desert — Rajneeshpuram — on what had been the Big Muddy Ranch in Eastern Oregon. Thousands of people from around the world gathered here to celebrate life and transform the landscape. But by 1986, they were gone.

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40 Years of Jaws

Jaws

I’ve been posting about the 35th anniversary of The Shining over the last several weeks, but I thought it might be better to wait until it was officially summertime to post about the 40th anniversary of Jaws. The summer movie as we know it today didn’t exist until Jaws devoured box offices all summer long in 1975. Along with Star Wars‘ release in 1977, the pair of films changed the entire calendar of film releasing, creating the template for the modern blockbuster and put an end to the New Hollywood movement that made both of the movies possible in the first place.

Besides the game-changing industry impact of Jaws, the story of the making of the film was nearly as treacherous, desperate and paranoia-inducing as the plot of the film. From shooting on the open ocean, to doubts about the inexperienced director, Steven Spielberg, to the malfunctioning mechanical monster, it’s a wonder the movie ever made it to the screen.… Read the rest

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Cell Phone Radiation Is Probably Cooking Your Brain and Balls (and What You Can Do About It)

mobilize

Via Midwest Real

Kevin Kunze is the filmmaker behind Mobilize, an investigative documentary exploring the negative long-term health effects of cell phone radiation. The film examines recent scientific research, follows national legislative efforts, and exposes the influence that technology companies have on public health.

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This is an unfortunate rabbit hole my friends, because I love me some technology. I’m constantly ranting about it, tweeting about it, or manipulating it in some manner. It’s certainly not lost on me that without it, this show and this site wouldn’t even exist in the first place. I’ll even go out on a limb and say that technology and the insatiable, uniquely human, desire to continually lift our circumstances is intimately intertwined with the destiny of mankind (if that’s a thing).

As Terence McKenna put it:

“Technology is the real skin of our species… We take in matter that has a low degree of organization; we put it through mental filters, and we extrude jewelry, gospels, space shuttles.

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Act of Killing sequel The Look of Silence unearths deeper truths about Indonesia’s violent past

Getting away with murder. Dogwoof

Getting away with murder. Dogwoof

Andrew Beatty, Brunel University London

Joshua Oppenheimer’s acclaimed film, The Act of Killing, and its sequel The Look of Silence are about getting away with murder.

In 1965, the Indonesian military seized power and launched a nationwide massacre of the left. Much of the dirty work was delegated to death squads and Muslim militias, ordinary citizens as well as shock troops. The victims were party activists, intellectuals, artists, unionised workers and illiterate sharecroppers. In a few months, roughly one million people died, eight times the combined death toll of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But unlike the victims of aerial bombing, Indonesians fell to individual acts of murder, messy and sadistic. These films consider the performance and the legacy, the small print of organised slaughter.

Oppenheimer ignores the wider context of post-colonial, Cold War politics to concentrate on local operations in North Sumatra – a sideshow to the pogroms of Java and Bali but similar in their meticulous brutality.… Read the rest

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Celebrating Ginsberg

ginsberg

Following last month’s release of The Essential Ginsberg and the author’s June 3 birthday, here is the impressionistic biography An Elegy for Allen Ginsberg which tells the story of the Allen Ginsberg’s life from the point of view of his final days…

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