Dreams

After a nightmare of God drowning your country, would you even risk not building a new Noah’s Ark based on the biblical dimensions? Via CNN:

A Dutchman has built a replica of Noah’s Ark to biblical proportions, following a dream his homeland would be flooded. Johan Huibers, a wealthy businessman, used the ancient measurement of the cubit — the length of a man’s arm from elbow to fingertips — to build the vessel to the dimensions specified in the book of Genesis.

The finished craft…has just been opened to the public on the Merwede River in the Dutch town of Dordrecht. Huibers has filled his ark, which will operate as a “Bible museum,” with life-sized plastic animals and an aviary of live birds to give visitors more to interact with.


If this app works, how long before others start to “program” your dreams in ways you may not want? From CNN: Harvard PhD student Daniel Nadler is trying to bring a really…






Dream PoliceBeware the “Dream Police” in (honor) of our U.S. ‘Tax Day”! … Will we ever have “dream police” to look forward to…? This Cheap Trick song is unfortunately ominous now. Pallab Ghosh writes in BBC News:

A US researcher has said he plans to electronically record and interpret dreams. Writing in the journal Nature, researchers said they have developed a system capable of recording higher-level brain activity.

“We would like to read people’s dreams,” says the lead scientist Dr Moran Cerf. The aim is not to interlope, but to extend our understanding of how and why people dream.

For centuries, people have been fascinated by dreams and what they might mean; in ancient Egypt for example, they were thought to be messages from the gods. More recently, dream analysis has been used by psychologists as a tool to understand the unconscious mind. But the only way to interpret dreams was to ask people about the subject of their dreams after they had woken up.

The eventual aim of Dr Cerf’s project is to develop a system that would enable psychologists to corroborate people’s recollections of their dream with an electronic visualisation of their brain activity.





Jeremy Hsu writes on LiveScience: Playing video games before bedtime may give people an unusual level of awareness and control in their dreams, LiveScience has learned. That ability to shape the alternate…