Tag Archives | Drugs

The Web Revolution That’s Changing How the World Gets High

[disinfo ed.’s note: excerpted from DRUGS UNLIMITED: The Web Revolution That’s Changing How the World Gets High by Mike Power. Copyright © 2013 by the author and reprinted by permission of Thomas Dunne Books.]

It is mainly the young who are suffering the consequences of society’s inability to update our drug laws effectively for the modern age. Almost one third of young people are searching for ways of getting legally high, according to the latest survey commissioned by the Angelus Foundation, a campaign group founded in 2009 by Maryon Stewart, whose twenty-one-year-old daughter Hester, a gifted medical student and keen athlete, died after taking GBL in 2009. (Gamma-butyrolactone, a paint stripper and industrial cleaner, can be used as an intoxicant and is poplar on the club scene. It is active at 1 ml, and causes euphoria and disinhibition, but overdoses, where users fall into a coma-like state, are commonplace since it is so potent.… Read the rest

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Kratom can reduce opiate addiction, get you high, and is legal in the US.

Mitragyna speciosa leaves by Uomo vitruviano via Wikimedia Commons.

Mitragyna speciosa leaves by Uomo vitruviano via Wikimedia Commons.

Have you tried Kratom?

via AlterNet:

Why are people across the U.S. chewing on the small, glossy leaves of the Southeast Asian Kratom tree? It’s an ancient plant medicine related to coffee, and it produces a high that’s both euphoric and legal. Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) has long been used in Thailand and Malaysia to relieve pain, settle the stomach and reduce opiate dependence. Now it’s taking off in the West.

According to SageWisdom.org, Kratom leaves can be chewed fresh or dry, powdered, or brewed into a tea. It is not usually smoked, because the “amount of leaf that constitutes a typical dose is too much to be smoked easily.” It’s most commonly sold in powder form in packets, both online and in kava bars—alcohol-free bars where people can consume tea made from the legal, Polynesian kava root— and head shops.

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Legal highs need regulation, not an outright ban

Bans don’t work. matthijs, CC BY-NC-ND

Bans don’t work. matthijs, CC BY-NC-ND

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Matthew Warren, University of Oxford

A few doors down from my house, a man is selling drugs. He has herbs to smoke that could leave me happy and stoned and various white powders to ingest that could keep me partying all night. All this would be totally legal, because he runs my local head shop.

Such easy access means people succumb to buying these drugs. One in five freshers who are starting universities this month have admitted to trying one of these legal highs.

Like many countries, the UK is currently working out how to deal with legal highs, or, to use the proper nomenclature, New Psychoactive Substances (NPS). Over the past decade, the use of NPS has become increasingly common as more and more products and head shops enter the market.… Read the rest

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Smart and Smarter Drugs

8354791187_a8970f08c5_bAre we asking the right questions about smart drugs? Marek Kohn looks at what they can do for us – and what they can’t.

“You know how they say that we can only access 20 per cent of our brain?” says the man who offers stressed-out, blank-screened ‘writer’ Eddie Morra a fateful pill in the 2011 film Limitless. “Well, what this does, it lets you access all of it.” Morra, played by Bradley Cooper, is instantly transformed into a superhuman by the fictitious drug NZT-48. Granted access to all cognitive areas, he learns to play the piano in three days, finishes writing his book in four, and swiftly makes himself a millionaire.

Limitless is what you get when you flatter yourself that your head houses the most complex known object in the universe, and run away with the notion that it must have powers to match. More down to earth is the idea that we always have untapped cognitive potential, but that life gets between us and the best we could possibly manage.… Read the rest

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The Dangers of Ambien and Other Sleeping Aids

800px-Kc-zolpidem-10mg

via AlterNet:

It has been several years since the bloom fell off the rose of Ambien, the blockbuster sleeping pill. Recently, the FDA has warned about Ambien hangovers, sedation and the risk of dangerous driving and recommended lower doses. The FDA warnings came a year after Kerry Kennedy, daughter of Robert F. Kennedy and former wife of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, was arrested for what was believed to be Ambien-inebriated driving. The arrest came six years after her cousin, former Rhode Island Congressman Patrick J. Kennedy, son of Sen. Edward Kennedy, was also involved in an apparent Ambien-related traffic mishap.

After Rep. Kennedy’s crash, as stories of more bizarre behavior on the sleeping pill surfaced, Ambien’s manufacturer Sanofi-Aventis, was forced to launch an ad campaign telling people if they were going to take Ambien, to get in bed and stay there. (Or you’ll “break out in handcuffs” as the joke goes.) Reports of driving, eating, sex and other “wakeful” behavior in Ambien blackouts proliferated.

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Caffeine Powder and Overdoses

rhinocaffeine

I’ve used caffeine powder before. I would put a little bit in my coffee to make it stronger.

via Cincinnati.com:

With a new school year underway, poison control officials in Kentucky and across the nation are sounding the alarm about powdered caffeine, used by some teens to boost workouts, weight loss or energy but implicated in the death of a high school wrestler in Ohio.

Many poison control officials want the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to restrict the use of the increasingly popular powder, and U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., is calling for an outright ban.

FDA officials say they are collecting information and will consider regulatory action, and urge consumers to avoid the product in the meantime.

“I drink coffee. … We’re not trying to get rid of caffeine. It is just this form and this dose,” said Henry Spiller, director of the Central Ohio Poison Center.

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Testing LSD On Humans – You’re Next

Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris (Photo: Twitter)

Dr. Robin Carhart-Harris (Photo: Twitter)

Dr Robin Carhart-Harris is the first scientist in over 40 years to test LSD on humans. He talks to The Independent‘s Laurence Phelan about fighting the establishment, battling preconceptions and breaking down egos:

On a hot evening in June, in a crowded room above a London pub, Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, a research associate in the Centre for Neuropsychopharma-cology at Imperial College, is giving a public talk about his work. He is having to make himself heard over the boozy commotion downstairs, where people are watching Chile put Spain out of the World Cup. But there is a slightly giddy atmosphere in the function room, too, because the doctor’s area of research is as exciting as it is taboo: he is investigating the brain effects and potential therapeutic uses of psychedelic drugs.

Carhart-Harris is the first person in the UK to have legally administered doses of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to human volunteers since the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971, and his presentation climaxes with a slide showing something no one else has seen before: an as-yet unpublished cross-sectional image of the brain of a volunteer who was in an fMRI scanner while tripping on acid.

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