dystopia






If we were in fact drawing closer to the scenario he describes fifty years ago, what would the drug in question be?

Aldous Huxley, speaking at U.C. Berkeley in 1962, outlines his vision for the ‘ultimate revolution’, a scientific dictatorship where people will be conditioned to enjoy their servitude, and will pose little opposition to the ‘ruling oligarchy’, as he puts it. He also takes a moment to compare his book, “Brave New World,” to George Orwell’s “1984” and considers the technique in the latter too outdated for actual implementation.

“There will be, in the next generation or so, a pharmacological method of making people love their servitude, and producing dictatorship without tears…they will be distracted from any desire to rebel by propaganda or brainwashing, or brainwashing enhanced by pharmacological methods. And this seems to be the final revolution.”




I’ve been following this website for a while now. I heard of it through science fiction writer and futurist Bruce Sterling. I think many disinfonauts would enjoy it as well. The basic premise is that while nature becomes culture ( picture a wilderness area being cleared and turned into a subdivision) culture also eventually becomes nature (picture the Exclusion zone of Chernobyl becoming a wilderness again, or urban areas becoming habitats for wild animals) Man-made systems, seeking to simplify nature, often become overly complex and devolve back in to chaos:





In this column for Toronto Standard, Emily Keeler asks, “Are Dystopic literary visions becoming the way of the world?” Call me Henry Case, but i think she might be on to something….