Tag Archives | Egypt

Yearly Ancient Egyptian Festival Of Ritual Binge Drinking And Public Sex Uncovered

festival of ritual

The debaucherous activities were considered a means for individuals to directly voice themselves to the gods, in what seems like a scary, society-wide version of Woodstock 99. Via the Los Angeles Times:

Since 2001, Johns Hopkins University archaeologist Betsy Bryan has led the excavation of the temple complex of the Egyptian goddess Mut in modern-day Luxor, the site of the city of Thebes in ancient Egypt. And the ritual she has uncovered, which centers on binge drinking, thumping music and orgiastic public sex, probably makes “Jersey Shore” look pretty tame.

Bryan, a specialist in Egypt’s New Kingdom (roughly 1600 to 1000 BC), has painstakingly pieced together the details of the Festivals of Drunkenness, which took place in homes, at temples and in makeshift desert shrines throughout ancient Egypt at least once a year.

Bryan [explains], “What’s really distinctive about these rituals is their communal nature, their participatory aspect. The people in attendance were everybody from the highest elites to groups of far more modest members of society.

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Meet the ‘Muslim Anarchist’ Whose Cartoons Are Driving Fundamentalists in Egypt Crazy

Medea Benjamin writes at Alternet (title from Infoshop News):

One of the women who spoke at the Women’s Assembly during the World Social Forum in Tunisia was not a political activist, but a cartoonist. Dooa Eladl is 34-year-old Egyptian woman who calls herself a Muslim anarchist.  Her work appears in the prominent newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm—Egyptians Today. She has become one of Egypt’s best-known political cartoonists, in a field completely dominated by men. (One of her humorous drawings is a portrait of herself marching to work, her hair tied to the mustaches of four of her male colleagues.)

During the Egyptian uprising, Eladl and her colleagues supported the revolution by printing up some of their fiercest political satire, the kind that would not have been published, and handing them out in Tahrir Square. “I don’t think artists like myself should be members of political parties or organizers, but we should certainly use our art to speak out against injustice and oppression.”

Eladl’s blistering caricatures have landed her in hot water with some of Egypt’s powerful fundamentalists.

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Swarm Of 30 Million Locusts Consumes Egypt

This certainly looks like the end of the world. The last time a swarm of a similar magnitude occurred was 2004, causing massive crop damage across the country. The prevalence of locust mega-outbreaks is expected to increase with global warming:
In Cairo, residents burned tires to create a black fog to keep the locusts from settling in the city. Swarms were also reported to have reached Egypt's Red Sea city of Zafarana, some 200 kilometers (124 miles) from Cairo. The Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture issued a statement saying it had set up task forces to deal with the locust plague.
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Egypt Considering Making Pyramids And Sphinx Available For Rent

Book for your next birthday now. Al Arabiya reports:

Egypt’s finance ministry sent a proposal to the country’s antiquities ministry to consider offering key monuments, including the pyramids, to international tourism firm as a quick solution to generate funds needed to overcome the financial crisis, an official has said.

Rumors about the proposal, which some described as preposterous, have circulated online for weeks. But on Wednesday, Adel Abdel Sattar, the secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, in an interview with Egypt’s ONTV channel confirmed the existence of a proposal to offer Egypt’s monuments, including the pyramids in Giza, the Sphinx, the Abu Simbel Temple and the temples of Luxor.

Sattar said the proposal indicated that such a move would provide a quick solution to the country’s financial deficit as it will generate about $200 billion over five years.

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Mubarak Retrial? Backstory to the Revolution

Mohamed Morsi croppedFor those disinfonauts following the ongoing saga of the Egyptian Revolution, two recent developments should keep Egypt-watchers glued to their screens. First, current president Muhammad Morsi has called an early parliamentary election on April 22nd, which the opposition promptly responded to by declaring a boycott. Second, former president Hosni Rubarak’s retrial has been slated to commence on April 13th:

He faces charges of conspiring to kill protesters during the 2011 revolt that ended his 29-year rule, and corruption.

A retrial was ordered in January after a court accepted his appeal against the life sentence he had been serving since his conviction last June.

Mr Mubarak, 84, is currently in a military hospital. About 850 people were killed in the 2011 crackdown.

News of the retrial came as his successor as president, Mohammed Morsi, met US Secretary of State John Kerry, who was concluding a two-day visit to Egypt.

The two leaders were said to have discussed Egypt’s political crisis as well as Syria, Iran and Middle East peace.

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The Boy Who Cried Wolf: 2012, Fenrir and Asteroid DA 14

Via SacredGeometryInternational.com

We all remember the well known fable told by the ancient Greek slave and storyteller, Aesop, about the shepherd boy drafted to keep watch over a flock of sheep, and who, out of boredom, decided it would be great fun to fool the nearby villagers by pretending that a wolf was attacking the sheep. After the villagers rushed out to save the sheep a number of times based upon the boys fabrications they refused to believe him when the wolf actually did show up and began to consume the sheep. The obvious declared moral of the story is generally expressed as “There is no believing a liar, even when he is telling the truth.” However, there is, I submit, a second, unstated moral to the story as well. In spite of the shepherd boys prevarications the wolf was real. And the wolf did, in the end, show up to devour the poor sheep.

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Randall Carlson and Scott Onstott: The Science of Prophecy, Harmonic Design, and The Great Work

Via Sacred Geometry International For our inaugural Sacred Geometry International Radio episode, we are very excited to feature a fascinating conversation between independent scholar Randall Carlson and esoteric researcher Scott Onstott.  In this discussion, Scott and Randall consider the potential meaning of the harmonic proportions of Sacred Geometry, as they are redundantly encoded throughout the ancient kingdom, most notably in structures such as the Great Pyramid of Cheops at Giza. Questions raised include whether our remote ancestors understood the size and shape of the Earth with accuracy rivaling modern satellite surveys?  Could they have measured the speed of light in not only miles but meters per second and encoded these fundamental constants of nature into the geometry of the Great Pyramid? If so for what possible purpose? Were our ancestors aware of a cycle of catastrophe and to what lengths might they have gone to to preserve such knowledge?
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Anniversary Of Egyptian Revolution Brings More Beatings In Tahrir Square

Two years after the start of the revolution that finally rid Egypt of Hosni Mubarak, police are still beating down revolutionaries in Tahrir Square, report Ramy Francis and Laura Smith-Spark for CNN:
The streets around Cairo's Tahrir Square were again roiled by violent clashes between police and protesters Friday, as crowds gathered to mark two years since the start of the revolution that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. At least 29 protesters have been treated over the past 12 hours for cuts, broken bones and birdshot injuries, Health Ministry spokesman Khaled El Khatib said...
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Papyri Reveal Ancient Egyptians Practiced Voluntary Eternal Slavery To Holy Temples

I bet the church today wishes it could still do this. Sci-News writes:

About one hundred of 2,200-year-old papyrus slave contracts have revealed that ancient Egyptians voluntarily entered into slave contracts with a local temple in the Egyptian city Tebtunis for all eternity, and even paid a monthly fee for the privilege.

“I am your servant from this day onwards, and I shall pay 2,5 copper-pieces every month as my slave-fee before Soknebtunis, the great god,” say the papyri from the temple city of Tebtunis, as translated by egyptologist Dr Kim Ryholt of the University of Copenhagen.

“Many chose to live as temple slaves because it was the only way of avoiding the harsh alternative [of forced manual labor]; the temple was simply the lesser of two evils for these people. And for the temples, this was a lucrative practice that gave them extra resources and money.”

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