Tag Archives | Egypt

Mubarak Refuses To Leave – Can Egypt Avoid Coup Or Violent Revolution?

Tahrir Square

Tahrir Square, Feb. 10, 2011.

All of Egypt was at fever pitch in anticipation that President Hosni Mubarak would resign in a televised speech this evening. Instead he refused to move and set himself up for massive conflict with a broad mass of Egyptians who want a real democracy in this large, civilized, educated but desperately poor country. What happens next is anyone’s guess. Al Jazeera continues to have the best coverage of any media service; here’s their latest report:

Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian president, has refused to step down from his post, saying that he will not bow to “foreign pressure” in a televised address to the nation.

Mubarak announced that he had put into place a framework that would lead to the amendment of six constitutional articles in the address late on Thursday night.

“I can not and will not accept to be dictated orders from outside, no matter what the source is,” Mubarak said.

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Egyptian Google Exec Released After Unlawful Arrest

Photo: Jerry Jackson

Photo: Jerry Jackson (CC)

After Amnesty raised concerns that the Egyptian executive of Google was being held without reason, he was released today, 10 days after his disappearance. CNN reports:

Google executive Wael Ghonim was released Monday in Egypt, the company announced.

“Huge relief — Wael Ghonim has been released. Our love to him and his family,” the company tweeted shortly after 8 p.m. in Cairo (1 p.m. ET).

Ghonim’s Twitter account, which had not had a posting since he went missing January 28, carried a tweet around the same time.

“Freedom is a bless (sic) that deserves fighting for it,” the tweet said, ending with the hashtag “#Jan25,” a reference to the Egypt protests.

Minutes later, Ghonim added this tweet: “Gave my 2 cents to Dr. Hosam Badrawy. who was reason why I am out today. Asked him resign cause that’s the only way I’ll respect him.”

Hossam Badrawi, often described as a relatively liberal politician, was recently elevated to become secretary general of the ruling National Democratic Party.

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Mummies And Dummies: Leave Or Stay, The Egyptian Crisis Will Only Get Deeper With No Quick Fix Likely

The African journalist Nathanial Manheru chose a quote from French icon Andre Malraux’s Anti-Memoirs to understand current events in Egypt: “It is in Egypt that we are reminded that (man) invented the tomb.”

The tomb may be the appropriate metaphor not only for wannabe President for forever Hosni Mubarak but also for the 30 plus year neo-colonial economic system that he has presided over.  Not surprisingly Frank Wisner Jr., the former U.S. Ambassador and son of a CIA dirty trickster, wants the President to stick around—in the country’s interest, of course.

Battle of the Pyramids by Francois Watteau, 1798-1799.

Battle of the Pyramids by Francois Watteau, 1798-1799.

And Western countries are now aligning with the people in the suites—not the streets. So much for the bottom-up democracy that President Obama has appeared to support. We want freedom there—but we can wait!

What’s next for Egypt?

The 82 year old President seems stuck in the final stages of his own mummification.… Read the rest

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Tear Gas Canister Stamped ‘Made In USA’ Used Against Egyptian Protesters

Tear Gas in EgyptVia HuffPo. Richard Engel reporting for NBC News:
You talked earlier about anti-American sentiment and a lot of that has been because the United States while today the Press Secretary is saying how they've been talking about Egypt and the need for reform and bringing up this at every meeting that's not the way many Egyptians see it. Most Egyptians see the United States as having stood solidly by President Mubarak while the government here grew more and more corrupt. And they see the Americans as complicit in it. And just today, for example, when we were out on streets this is what a lot of people were showing us about American involvement. If you can see in my hands this is one of the tear gas canisters and very clearly written in English on it, it says "Made in the USA by Combined Tactical Systems from Jamestown, Pennsylvania." And they say this is the kind of support that the United States has been giving to the Egyptian government and bears some responsibility, although today it it trying to say that it never backed Mubarak so much, it has been calling for reforms for a long time, Egyptians don't see it that way.
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Proof That The United States Is Behind The Fall Of Mubarak

President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel and President Barack Obama.

President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel and President Barack Obama, Sept. 2010.

Elad Pressman, editor of a major Israeli political website, was my guest on my radio show and did he have news! The Daily Telegraph had dug into WikiLeaks documents and pieced together a report that convincingly proves the United States was behind the violent Egyptian protests:

The American Embassy in Cairo helped a young dissident attend a US-sponsored summit for activists in New York, while working to keep his identity secret from Egyptian state police.

On his return to Cairo in December 2008, the activist told US diplomats that an alliance of opposition groups had drawn up a plan to overthrow President Hosni Mubarak and install a democratic government in 2011. He has already been arrested by Egyptian security in connection with the demonstrations and his identity is being protected by The Daily Telegraph.

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McCain Calls Democracy In Middle East A “Virus”

"This virus is spreading throughout the Middle East. This is probably the most dangerous period of history...in the Middle East." Speaking to FOX News, John McCain echoes the current sentiments of many politicians and pundits distressed by recent events in Egypt and Tunisia. Because the rules are, democracy only belongs in the countries where we choose to impose it. Via Think Progress:
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President Obama, Say The ‘D-Word’

Egyptian Protests

Photo: Muhammad Ghafari. Giza, Egypt (CC)

Mark LeVine writes on Al Jazeera:

It’s incredible, really. The president of the United States can’t bring himself to talk about democracy in the Middle East. He can dance around it, use euphemisms, throw out words like “freedom” and “tolerance” and “non-violent” and especially “reform,” but he can’t say the one word that really matters: democracy.

How did this happen? After all, in his famous 2009 Cairo speech to the Muslim world, Obama spoke the word loudly and clearly — at least once.

“The fourth issue that I will address is democracy,” he declared, before explaining that while the United States won’t impose its own system, it was committed to governments that “reflect the will of the people… I do have an unyielding belief that all people yearn for certain things: the ability to speak your mind and have a say in how you are governed; confidence in the rule of law and the equal administration of justice; government that is transparent and doesn’t steal from the people; the freedom to live as you choose.

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Al Jazeera English Blacked Out Across Most Of U.S.

Al JazeeraFreedom of the press? Ryan Grim writes on the Huffington Post:

WASHINGTON — Canadian television viewers looking for the most thorough and in-depth coverage of the uprising in Egypt have the option of tuning into Al Jazeera English, whose on-the-ground coverage of the turmoil is unmatched by any other outlet. American viewers, meanwhile, have little choice but to wait until one of the U.S. cable-company-approved networks broadcasts footage from AJE, which the company makes publicly available. What they can’t do is watch the network directly.

Other than in a handful of pockets across the U.S. — including Ohio, Vermont and Washington, D.C. cable carriers do not give viewers the choice of watching Al Jazeera. That corporate censorship comes as American diplomats harshly criticize the Egyptian government for blocking Internet communication inside the country and as Egypt attempts to block Al Jazeera from broadcasting.

The result of the Al Jazeera English blackout in the United States has been a surge in traffic to the media outlet’s website, where footage can be seen streaming live.

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