Tag Archives | Egyptology

Testing the Blue: Ancient Egyptian Alchemy

Pic: Adventures Unlimited Press (C)

Pic: Adventures Unlimited Press (C)

Testing the Blue:  Ancient Egyptian Alchemy

Stephen S. Mehler, M.A.

Assisted by George T. Bayer, Ph.D.

I have often stated in the last few years that the definitive book on alchemy has yet to be written. This is primarily because the actual practices, procedures and true origin of the system have also not been correctly delineated. Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary defines the word alchemy in two ways:  “the medieval chemical science, the great objects of which were to transmute base metals into gold,” and “the power to transform, or act of transforming, something common into something precious.” I consider the first definition to be superfluous, which I will address, but the second definition will be paramount to the meaning of this article as to the true ancient practice.

I have been fortunate to work with, be a student of, Egyptian-born Egyptologist and indigenous wisdom keeper Abd’El Hakim Awyan (see Figure 1)—a collaboration which has resulted in my two books, The Land of Osiris (Adventures Unlimited Press) and From Light Into Darkness (Adventures Unlimited Press).… Read the rest

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King Tut’s Body Spontaneously Combusted

mummyfireHoly Flaming Mummies, Batman! If “Burning Mummy” doesn’t become a stoner rock band name by next week I’m going to be very disappointed.

Via Raw Story:

Egyptologist Chris Nauton, the director of the Egypt Exploration Society, and a team of car crash investigators ran computer simulations that lend credence to the increasingly accepted theory that Tutankhamun was killed in a chariot accident. The simulations showed that the injuries scaling down one side of his body are consistent with a high-speed collision.

But it is the possibility of a botched mummification and its consequences that really interest Nauton.

“Despite all the attention Tut’s mummy has received over the years the full extent of its strange condition has largely been overlooked,” he said. “The charring and possibility that a botched mummification led the body spontaneously combusting shortly after burial was entirely unexpected, something of a revelation in fact.”

Keep reading.

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Imhotep The African: Architect of the Cosmos

imhotep[The following excerpt consists of the Preface and Chapter 1 of Imhotep the African: Architect of the Cosmos by Robert Bauval & Thomas Brophy, a new disinformation® book. The book is packed with photos, nearly all of which are NOT reproduced here.]

 Preface

A few kilometers outside the modern city of Cairo, on a large, flat elevation at the edge of the Sahara overlooking the Nile, is the world’s very first architectural complex. Nearly 5,000 years old, the centerpiece of this mind-boggling complex is a huge stepped pyramid surrounded by strange temple-like structures, the lot contained inside a giant perimeter wall whose length is more than 1,500 meters. Aligned conspicuously toward the four cardinal directions, this strange place evokes a mood, for lack of better words, of “sacred architecture”—or, perhaps more aptly, “sacred astronomy.” No doubt something extremely potent took place here— certainly rituals of the highest order that somehow involved the cycles of the celestial bodies as seen through the eyes of a holy man or shaman.… Read the rest

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A 1931 Plan To Convert Egypt’s Pyramids Into An Amusement Park

pyramidsAmazingly, no blueprint for a mammoth slide going down the side. Paleofuture reveals:

In a series of illustrations under the bold headline, “Mammoth Flying Swing to Give Bird’s Eye Pyramid View,” we see the pyramids as they could have been — the main attractions in Giza’s own version of Disneyland.

Signed by Art Williamson in the June 1931 issue of Modern Mechanics and Invention magazine, the illustrations show three cars swirling around the top of a pyramid, driven by a huge electric motor. The thrill seekers then were supposed to board the ride by crossing a gangplank that gives me vertigo just looking at it.

So why didn’t this unbelievably irreverent idea come to pass? One suspects it might have had something to do with objections from the Egyptian government. The illustration mentions that when (not if) the government’s consent is obtained, this amazing project will become a reality.

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Ancient Egyptian Sphinx Mysteriously Unearthed In Israel

sphinx

Things not where they are supposed to be? Historical strangeness via CNN:

A recent discovery of part of a 4,000-year-old Egyptian sphinx has been a most unexpected find in Tel Hazor in northern Israel.

Inexplicably buried far from Egypt, the paws of a sphinx statue, resting on its base, have been unearthed with an inscription in hieroglyphs naming King Mycerinus. The pharaoh ruled in 2500 BC and oversaw the construction of one of the three Giza pyramids.

“This is the only sphinx of this king known in the world – even in Egypt. It is also the only monumental piece of Egyptian sculpture found anywhere in the Levant,” said professor Amnon Ben-Tor, the director of the excavation, referring to the region spanning the east of the Mediterranean Sea.

Tel Hazor was the capital of the city of Canaan 4,000 years ago. The question of how the sphinx got to Tel Hazor will likely remain a mystery.

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5,000-Year-Old Egyptian Jewelry’s Materials Came From Outer Space

egyptian

The International Business Times reports on the interplanetary origins of ancient human culture:

A set of funeral beads which could be the oldest iron artifacts on earth actually came from outer space, archaeologists have claimed.

The nine iron beads, which were found in a 5000-year-old Egyptian cemetery in 1911, were made from a meteorite that crashed to earth around 3200 BC, according to a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

“These beads were made from meteoritic iron, and shaped by careful hammering of the metal into thin sheets before rolling them into tubes,” researchers noted, adding that neutron and X-ray scanning of the iron beads proved that the metal came from a meteorite.

The iron was strung into a necklace together with other exotic minerals such as lapis lazuli, gold and carnelian. The findings suggest that iron and metal works were much advanced in the ancient Egypt than previously thought.

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Ancient Egyptian Statue Caught Moving On Its Own

Time-lapse surveillance footage captures the 4,000-year-old statute gradually rotating. Is it merely from the vibrations of foot traffic in the museum, or something more sinister?
The 10-inch tall relic, an offering to the Egyptian God Osiris which dates back to 1800 BC, has been at the Manchester Museum for 80 years but curators say it has recently starting rotating 180 degrees during the day. The statue is of a man named Neb-Senu. Curators have been left scratching their heads after they kept finding it facing the wrong way. They now believe there could be a 'spiritual explanation' for the turning statue. It is believed that there is a curse of the pharaohs which strikes anyone who dares to take relics from a pyramid tomb. Experts decided to monitor the room on time-lapse video and were astonished to see it clearly show the statuette spinning 180 degrees - with nobody going near it.
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The Oldest Known Guide To Dreaming

book of dreamsThe 3,300-year-old Dream Book, via the British Museum:

The meaning of dreams is a subject that fascinated the ancient Egyptians. This hieratic papyrus, probably dates to the early reign of Ramesses II (1279-1213 BC).

On each page of the papyrus a vertical column of hieratic signs begins: ‘if a man sees himself in a dream’; each horizontal line describes a dream, followed by the diagnosis ‘good’ or ‘bad’, and then the interpretation. For example, ‘if a man sees himself in a dream looking out of a window, good; it means the hearing of his cry’. Or, ‘if a man sees himself in a dream with his bed catching fire, bad; it means driving away his wife’.

It is uncertain who the original owner was, but it passed into the hands of the scribe Qeniherkhepshef. The Dream Book was part of an archive, including a wide variety of literary, magical and documentary material, which passed down through [his] family.

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Yearly Ancient Egyptian Festival Of Ritual Binge Drinking And Public Sex Uncovered

festival of ritual

The debaucherous activities were considered a means for individuals to directly voice themselves to the gods, in what seems like a scary, society-wide version of Woodstock 99. Via the Los Angeles Times:

Since 2001, Johns Hopkins University archaeologist Betsy Bryan has led the excavation of the temple complex of the Egyptian goddess Mut in modern-day Luxor, the site of the city of Thebes in ancient Egypt. And the ritual she has uncovered, which centers on binge drinking, thumping music and orgiastic public sex, probably makes “Jersey Shore” look pretty tame.

Bryan, a specialist in Egypt’s New Kingdom (roughly 1600 to 1000 BC), has painstakingly pieced together the details of the Festivals of Drunkenness, which took place in homes, at temples and in makeshift desert shrines throughout ancient Egypt at least once a year.

Bryan [explains], “What’s really distinctive about these rituals is their communal nature, their participatory aspect. The people in attendance were everybody from the highest elites to groups of far more modest members of society.

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Jesus Had Shapeshifting Powers, According To Ancient Coptic Text

Sadly, the depictions of Jesus’s X-Men-like abilities were never incorporated into the mainstream version of the Bible read today. Live Science reports:

Dating back 1200 years, a newly deciphered Egyptian text tells part of the crucifixion story of Jesus with apocryphal plot twists, some of which have never been seen before. Written in the Coptic language, the ancient text explains why Judas used a kiss, specifically, to betray Jesus — because Jesus had the ability to change shape:

Then the Jews said to Judas: “How shall we arrest him [Jesus], for he does not have a single shape but his appearance changes. Sometimes he is ruddy, sometimes he is white, sometimes he is red…sometimes he is a youth, sometimes an old man…” This leads Judas to suggest using a kiss as a means to identify him.

Copies of the text are found in two manuscripts, one in the Morgan Library and Museum in New York City and the other at the Museum of the University of Pennsylvania.

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