Tag Archives | Einstein

Celebrate Pi Day

Sunday March 14th is Pi Day, as well as Albert Einstein’s birthday.

Animation of the act of unrolling a circle's circumference, illustrating the ratio π. Author: John Reid (GNU)

Animation of the act of unrolling a circle's circumference, illustrating the ratio π. Author: John Reid (GNU)

Self-confessed geek Elizabeth Landau reports for CNN on how nerds everywhere plan to celebrate:

The sound of meditation for some people is full of deep breaths or gentle humming. For Marc Umile, it’s “3.14159265358979…”

Whether in the shower, driving to work, or walking down the street, he’ll mentally rattle off digits of pi to pass the time. Holding 10th place in the world for pi memorization — he typed out 15,314 digits from memory in 2007 — Umile meditates through one of the most beloved and mysterious numbers in all of mathematics.

Pi, the ratio of circumference to diameter of a circle, has captivated imaginations for thousands of years — perhaps even since the first person tried to draw a perfect circle on the ground or wondered how to construct something round like a wheel.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Einstein’s Theory Of Relativity On Show

By Anne Barker for ABC News Australia:

The original manuscript of Albert Einstein’s famous theory of relativity is going on display in its entirety for the first time, almost 100 years after it was written.

Einstein’s groundbreaking theory helped explain a raft of scientific questions, from black holes to the big bang.

The former Nobel prize winner donated the manuscript to Israel’s Hebrew University in 1925.

Now, Israel’s Academy of Sciences and Humanities is putting it on show, in time for the 131st anniversary of Einstein’s birth…

Read the rest

Continue Reading

The First Test That Proves General Theory of Relativity Wrong

Vlad Tarko writes on Softpedia:
Relativity Is Wrong?According to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, a moving mass should create another field, called gravitomagnetic field, besides its static gravitational field. This field has now been measured for the first time and to the scientists’ astonishment, it proved to be no less than one hundred million trillion times larger than Einstein’s General Relativity predicts.

This gravitomagnetic field is similar to the magnetic field produced by a moving electric charge (hence the name “gravitomagnetic” analogous to “electromagnetic”). For example, the electric charges moving in a coil produce a magnetic field — such a coil behaves like a magnet. Similarly, the gravitomagnetic field can be produced to be a mass moving in a circle. What the electric charge is for electromagnetism, mass is for gravitation theory (the general theory of relativity).

A spinning top weights more than the same top standing still. However, according to Einstein’s theory, the difference is negligible.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Albert Einstein On Palestine And Zionism

By Edward Corrigan at OpEedNnews.com:
There is some controversy over Einstein's political views, especially on the issue of Palestine and the creation of a A Jewish State. Many Zionists claim Einstein as one of their own. Einstein, however, was a pacifist, a universalist and abhorred nationalism. The recently published book, Einstein on Israel and Zionism: His Provocative Ideas About the Middle East, by Fred Jerome, (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2009) has brought Einstein's political views on the Middle East back into the spotlight. The evidence of Einstein's position on Palestine and Zionism is best seen in his own words and actions on the subject. For example, Einstein made a presentation to the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry, which was examining the Palestine issue in January 1946 and argued against the creation of a "Jewish State."...
Continue Reading

Rethinking Relativity: Is Time Out of Joint?

Rachel Courtland asks a deep question in New Scientist:

Ever since Arthur Eddington travelled to the island of Príncipe off Africa to measure starlight bending around the sun during a 1919 eclipse, evidence for Einstein’s theory of general relativity has only become stronger. Could it now be that starlight from distant galaxies is illuminating cracks in the theory’s foundation?

Everything from the concept of the black hole to GPS timing owes a debt to the theory of general relativity, which describes how gravity arises from the geometry of space and time. The sun’s gravitational field, for instance, bends starlight passing nearby because its mass is warping the surrounding space-time. This theory has held up to precision tests in the solar system and beyond, and has explained everything from the odd orbit of Mercury to the way pairs of neutron stars perform their pas de deux.

Yet it is still not clear how well general relativity holds up over cosmic scales, at distances much larger than the span of single galaxies.

Read the rest
Continue Reading