Tag Archives | electronic music

Ayn Rand Goes Electro?

Apparently, (according to the press) this single (and the album it comes from) are sponsored by the “Pan-National Ayn Rand Institute.” Supposed motivational music for the new age of self-actualization, innovation, hyper-corporate marketing, social networking and speculation. A bit like an updated (electro!) version of ‘industrial musicals’ (a la Steve Young’s magnificent “Everything’s Coming Up Profits” book)

And here is the full blurb - http://www.ant-zen.com/act/act314.htm

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Steve Roach – Dream Body

Steve Roach is one of my favorite artists. He’s creatively prolific, and everything he does is impeccable. Check this out and enjoy.

via Wikipedia

Steve Roachis an American composer and performer of ambient, electronic music and tribal-ambient music, whose recordings are also classified in the genres of space, drone, and New Age. Roach is recognized as one of the “leading innovators of contemporary electronic music.”

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Algorave: Dance Music Created By Coding Algorithms

algoraveCan all digitally-created music really just be thought of as humans manipulating algorithms? If so, why not get to the heart of things? A burgeoning, extremely nerdy subculture called algorave revolves around generating, altering, and combining electronic sound loops via on-the-spot coding, using languages such as SuperCollider, with the coding projected on a large screen. Could this be the worst new form of music, or the most honest? Wikipedia writes:
An algorave is an event where people dance to music generated from algorithms, often using live coding techniques. Algoraves can include a range of styles, including a complex form of minimal techno, and has been described as a meeting point of hacker philosophy, geek culture, and clubbing. The first self-proclaimed "algorave" was held as a warmup concert for the SuperCollider Symposium 2012. The first North American algorave took place in Hamilton, Ontario during the artcrawl of 9 August 2013.
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Google’s Moog Doodle

Doodle_Quick_StartBack in 1999 when The Disinformation Company was just a couple of years old, we released a compilation CD called “Best Of Moog: Electronic Pop Hits From The 60′s & 70′s.” The project allowed us to collaborate with inventor of the Moog synthesizer (and many would say the founder of electronic music), Robert Moog, who wrote the liner notes and MC’d our release party in New York.

Bob passed away in 2005, but today Google is honoring his 78th birthday with one of its famous doodles, this time an interactive virtual Moog synth.

It’s lot of fun, check it out at Google, and for a guide to playing it, visit Moog Music’s Quick Start Guide.

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A Musical Performance By Four Tropical Plants

dg-site2Our senses provide us with only a small slice of the beauty occurring in the natural world around us. The Data Garden Quartet is music generated by living plants:

Data Garden presents a live exhibition recording of Quartet, the first plant-generated audio composition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The electronic impulses of four plants, interpreted by humans with the help of computers, has been employed to organize sound into beauty perceivable by the human ear. While the means of producing this beauty can be described in technical terms, the natural creative force generating this experience is less apparent.

We all think we know what nature sounds like. It’s birds chirping, wind through trees, thunder echoing through the valley. These are sounds that come from physical phenomena in nature, producing waves perceivable by the human ear: the need to mate, currents of air and water, static electricity. There are other phenomena in our natural environment, however, that produce information which we cannot perceive through our biological senses.

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Dehumanization In Contemporary Music

minajThis clip of pioneering German electronic composer Karlheinz Stockhausen might answer some of the questions one has after watching this year's Grammys. Does contemporary music still have the potential of touching basic human concerns such as love and hate, can it live, is it really valid art? Stockhausen's answer: the synthesized, auto-tuned music of today reflects a form of evolution as our best and brightest transform to a post-human, or "supra-human" state, got it?
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