End of the World


A central theme in Christian eschatology is the rise of the Antichrist. This Antichrist is supposed to trick millions (even billions) into worshiping him and, according to many on the Christian right, establish a one world government.

What better disguise for the ultimate false messiah to deceive the world than Jesus?

As I posted earlier, the Dominionist Joel’s Army movement believes less in feeding the poor and visiting those in prison like the Biblical Jesus taught than in slaughtering unbelievers and taking over all the countries of the world militarily and politically. The following video examines, from a more traditional Christian perspective, the possibility that Joel’s Army and the Dominionist movement are in fact the forces of the Antichrist, that the spirits that fill them are demons, and that the god they worship is actually Satan in disguise.


Glenn Wright wrote recently in the Examiner (before Gov. Perry officially declared his presidential candidacy): If Governor Rick Perry (R) of Texas runs for president of the United States, he will have…



Facebook LikeJesus Diaz writes on Gizmodo:

Lior and Vardit Adler just had a baby girl. She’s probably all cute and wrinkly! But they hate her soo much that they named her Like, in honor of the Like button in Facebook. Of course, they explain it differently:

To me it is important to give my children names that are not used anywhere else, at least not in Israel. If once people gave Biblical names and that was the icon, then today this is one of the most famous icons in the world, he said, joking that the name could be seen as a modern version of the traditional Jewish name Ahuva, which means “beloved.”

I believe there will be people who will lift a eyebrow, but it is my girl and that’s what’s fun about it.

Yes, dear readers, you are totally right: These parents — who live in Hod Hasharon, a town north-east of Tel Aviv, Israel — are idiots. Idiots, idiots, idiots. Idiots. Idiots who named their first two children Dvash — Hebrew for honey — and Pie. Compared to Like, those names seem as normal as John and Jane.




RaptureFun idea from MLKSHK that Gizmodo is making a contest out of. Mat Honan writes on Gizmodo:

A lot of people think the Rapture is coming May 21. It’s not. But assuming your pets are okay, here’s a prank we’d like you to pull. We call it Rapture Bombing.

On May 21, get a bunch of your old clothes in full sets of pants, shirts, and shoes. Bonus points if you leave accessories like an old watch or sunglasses to go with them. Lay them out as if people have suddenly disappeared, leaving only the clothes behind. Be creative.

Take pictures. Post them on our Facebook page, or tweet them with the hashtag #rapturebomb.

We’ll run the best ones; our favorites will win prizes. (Don’t get too excited—we’re talkin’ iPhone cases and shit.) And if you make your local news? You’ll be Giz’s hero for the day.

Here are some more post-“Rapture” photos.



In the “first” wave of 2012 apocalypse fears a couple of years ago, the media often paired disinformation (as the producers of the film 2012: Science or Superstition) with Dennis McClung, owner…


Jessica Ravitz tries to find out why, for CNN:

If you thought you had less than three perfectly healthy months to live, what would you do? Would you travel? Spend time with loved ones? Appreciate the joy life has given you?

Or would you ditch your kids and grandkids, join strangers in a caravan of RVs and travel the country warning people about the end of the world?

If you’re Sheila Jonas, that’s exactly what you’d do.

“This is so serious, I can’t believe I’m here,” says Jonas, who’s been on the road since fall. Like her cohorts, she’s “in it ’til the end,” which she believes is coming in May…



Having produced a feature-length documentary film and edited a book on the topic, I thought I’d interviewed or researched most of the important public figures who have something interesting or informative to…




NagasakiBombVia Diatribe Media:

We’re very excited to finally release our first episode of a new podcast series called “This Is The End!” Though the series will probably branch out to many different topics in the future, right now, much like the zine “This Is The End,” will center around an apocalyptic theme.

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The inaugural episode features two readings from our “Liquid Burning of Apocalyptic Bard Letters” reading series – one from Ian Randall, a Chicago slam poet and singer of the band Farmer’s Tan Market and one from Brandon Weatherbee, host of the You Me Them Everybody podcast series. You will be able to subscribe on iTunes very soon, but for now either click the link directly or use the player built in on this page.


On porn and the end of the world: The spread of porn is somewhat akin to Global Warming – both evidence that we are mistreating the Earth, but also has the potential…


Apocalypse narratives in kid’s movies — from The American Book of the Dead: Toy Story 3 then takes this theme [of loss] to a new level, in which the toys don’t just…



I thought of Magnolia when I read this headline, granted the frog raining that occurred in Greece wasn’t as bad as in the clip below, but it is a pretty messed up situation over there … Richard Lawson writes on Gawker:

“A carpet of frogs” covered a Thessaloniki highway, forcing closings for two hours. People are guessing they came from a lake nearby, but we know the truth. Hide your firstborns and blood your doors everyone, the Lord’s a’coming.




Alasdair Wilkins writes on io9.com:
NearbyNova

A white dwarf 3,260 light-years from Earth — mere walking distance in cosmic terms — looks like it could go supernova. And that stellar explosion would have dire consequences for our planet, not to mention our possible descendants.

Located in the binary system T Pyxidis, the white dwarf in question was originally thought to be far more distant from our solar system. Although three thousand light-years might sound like a fairly safe distance away from a potential supernova, it really is quite close by astronomical standards. To put it in some perspective, the diameter of the Milky Way, at roughly 100,000 light-years wide, is multiple orders of magnitude greater than what we’re talking about here.

The huge white dwarf in the T Pyxidis system is known as a recurrent nova because it undergoes relatively minor eruptions at regular intervals. Small nova explosions have been observed every twenty years for over a century, although the last recorded nova burst was in 1967. Astronomers are unsure why the star is overdue.


The following is part of John Gorenfeld’s article “‘End of the World Prophet Found in Error, Not Insane’: A Failed Prophet’s Survival Handbook,” one of over 40 articles in the Disinformation anthology, Everything You Know About God Is Wrong: The Disinformation Guide to Religion, edited by Russ Kick. For more on John Gorenfeld, check out www.gorenfeld.net.

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CrystalBallThought about becoming an end-of-the-world prophet? It’s not the make-or-break enterprise you might think, as much as your gut feeling may be that mobs of angry parishioners await the fortune-teller who talks them into making room on the calendar for the final trumpets, the Rapture, World War III, the return of Jesus, global computer meltdowns, or post-game shows on life hosted by great messiahs stepping out of the pages of history — only for the poor dupes to find themselves paying bills the next week.

Time and again, it hasn’t worked that way. The beauty of blown prophecies is that failure is the beginning of success. That is, if you adopt the techniques of history’s most successful faulty prophets. Through time-tested rebranding methods, they’ve reinvented failure as proof that they were righter than anyone could have imagined.

The very glue holding your congregation together can be a mistaken prediction and what you’ve invested in it. Thousands of apostles of Shaini Goodwin of Tacoma, Washington, known to admirers as the “Dove of Oneness” and to the Tacoma News Tribune as a “cybercult queen,” hold out for a Judgment Day that will justify all of her bad guesses.