Tag Archives | Environment

Terrestrial Energy Co.: Vanquish the Arrested Future of Nuclear Energy

Screen Shot 2014-10-30 at 8.42.00 PM

In a Sept 2014 talk at the Economic Club of Canada, Hugh MacDiarmid coolly lays out the groundwork of a new energy future, without the pie-in-the-sky wishes of fusion, the intermittent inadequacy of solar and wind, or the non-renewable carbon emissions of coal, oil, and gas.

Canadian company Terrestrial Energy is on track to make the first commercially viable molten salt nuclear reactor by early next decade, at first supplementing coal but ultimately supplanting it for electricity production. The molten salt reactor (MSR) is a type of Generation 4 reactor with roots in the 1950s at Oak Ridge National Lab and has manifold advantages over existing reactors. The MSR uses a liquid salt loop to contain its fissile material such as uranium, thorium, or plutonium oxides. Since the reaction occurs in liquid fuel, it is literally impossible to melt down, and since it reacts at atmospheric pressure there is no need for a massive reinforced containment vessel.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Nate Hagens – Limits to Growth: Where We Are and What to Do About It

Is the global economy hitting the limits to growth?

In this talk, Nate Hagens will synthesize the current landscape of global energy, environment and financial risks while offering suggestions on what to do as a hominid living on a full planet. He will raise the question of whether it is possible to degrow our economies with conscious effort before our options are constrained by external forces. After a quick summary of the situation, he will lead a conversation with the audience on appropriate responses to these challenges. Are large climate rallies accomplishing anything? If they aren’t, what is a better plan of action?

Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Ayahuasca Dialogues

If you’re concerned about the future of psychedelic medicines and ethical/sustainable sources, then please support this project by the Ethnobotanical Stewardship Council. They are making big strides and can use all our help.

From The Nexian:

With the continued rise in popularity of psychedelic plant medicines, concerns surrounding sustainable harvesting methods and safe administration by practitioners are growing. The Ethnobotanical Stewardship Council is a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring the sustainable and safe use of traditional plants and enriching the communities who work with them.

As we have seen in recent articles, unsustainable harvesting is a growing issue with ayahuasca, mimosa and acacia trees, iboga, peyote, and even sassafras in SE Asia. Quite antithetical to the earth-centered teachings of these plants, these harvesting methods have a devastating impact on the environment.

In order to truly heal with the planet we must not only have these experiences of higher awareness of the biosphere, but put our thoughts into action and become the stewards of nature, not its disease.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Sustainable Psychedelics: Cultivating a Viable Relationship with the Medicine

Moderator dreamer042 of the DMT-Nexus elaborates on more sustainable approaches to utilizing psychedelics:

As the global demand for entheogenic medicines 1grows, we are seeing a simultaneous rise in unsustainable harvesting, poaching, and related ecological damage. The question we, as responsible explorers of expanded consciousness, should be asking is, “What are the hidden costs associated with my personal path of healing through medicine work?” From the cultural and environmental impact of the ever-growing ayahuasca tourism industry in the Amazon, to the ripping up of mature mimosa trees for their root bark in Brazil, to the stripping of protected acacia trees in Australia, to the poaching of iboga to near extinction in Africa, to the destruction of what remains of the ever shrinking North American peyote habitat. It’s time for a radical shift in the way we relate to these sacred plant teachers.

You will often hear people endlessly expounding on the idea that you should never drink ayahuasca without a shaman or that the only way to have an authentic experience is to jet-set halfway around the world and attend a ceremony in Peru or Gabon.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Democracy in the Pits: Taking a Look at Mining in Canada

6923990782_b119eb03fa_b

These articles were sent to me by fellow Disinfonaut, Earth Star, via the contact page.

Democracy in the Pits: The Corrosive Effect of Canadian Mining Companies Worldwide

In a recent article chronicling the demise of Canadian social democracy at the hands of the Harper Conservatives, Marianne Lenabat draws an important comparison: what the financial sector is to the United States, so are the extractive industries to Canada. The similarity isn’t just about the two sectors’ relative size or contribution to GDP, although it starts there. It’s about how each country’s respective darling industry has come to dictate government policy, even when the social harm they inflict far outweighs their economic benefits.

In both countries, the same platitudes are trotted out to justify the government’s helpless devotion: The industry is vital to the economic health of the nation. It leads the world in innovation. It creates the jobs we need to build communities of hard-working families.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

When DMT Equals Killing the Environment

The dark side of DMT production…These atrocities have been going on for a very long time. If you read this link, you can see that the same thing has been and is happening with Mimosa hostilis, along with other psychedelic containing species, since at least the 90’s…

If you truly value the environment and profound teachings these plants offer humanity then please help us spread awareness of this idiotically unsustainable harvesting by sharing this information with others.

Via The Nexian:

In late September of this year (2014), Australian acacia expert, Nen, was confronted with one example of the potential ecological costs of the skyrocketing interest in DMT. The following is his account of what he encountered:

What I saw yesterday has left me sickened and shocked.

I took the Nexian, Spice Sailor, to see a very special and pristine nature reserve in a national park where there were large mother seed trees of Acacia obtusifolia.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Wealth in Poverty: A Tribal’s View

Women in a tribal (Gond adivasi) village, Umaria district, India. Picture taken during a meeting organised by Ekta Parishad about land rights, the main grievance of the Adivasi people. By Yann via Wikimedia Commons.

Women in a tribal (Gond adivasi) village, Umaria district, India. Picture taken during a meeting organised by Ekta Parishad about land rights, the main grievance of the Adivasi people. By Yann via Wikimedia Commons.

This is an excerpt from “The Little Earth Book” by James Bruges.

Wealth means different things to different people. For a tribal person, money has little value. It is community they value.

The community at Gudalur, South India, is extremely poor. They used to live in the forest but could not prove ownership of any land. In their culture, there was no conception that land could be owned. Land, water and air are regarded as commons, available for all to use.

The government sold the forests in which the tribal community adivasis lived. It was assumed that the forests were empty and Brooke Bond acquired large tracts as tea plantations. Tribals continued to live on the edges.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Randall Carlson on Rewriting History, Bridging the Gap Between Science and Religion and Avoiding Catastrophe

Via Midwest Real
image image 
Every night we go to bed taking it for granted that tomorrow will come. Sure, from time to time we have an unpleasant thought along the lines of “worst case scenario, my heart will give out and I won’t wake up.”

But, what if that wasn’t the worst case scenario?IMG_1109

As we speak, massive chunks of instant extinction are flying by the vessel we inhabit at preposterous speeds. If one of them crosses Earth’s path, it could easily be game over for the human race.

As long as we’ve been aware of that inconvenient fact, it’s been good for precisely one thing- apathy. That’s because the ability to do anything about it was completely absent from the equation. Well, that’s not the case anymore. We actually do have the technology and intelligence to do something about it. However, thus far, we’ve shown a complete and total lack of will to seriously discuss it.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

EPA Publishes Chemical Risk Assessment After 28 Years

500px-Environmental_Protection_Agency_logo.svgIn other environmental news: the EPA, in an unprecedented act, has failed to publish a chemical risk assessment in over 28 years. They finally broke this shockingly long duration last month with their assessment of trichloroethylene (TCE).

via Al Jazeera America:

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hit a major milestone that some people, including leaders at the agency itself, think shouldn’t be celebrated.

On Wednesday, the agency released a final risk assessment for trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial solvent used by artists, car mechanics, dry cleaners and others. The EPA’s in-depth report, released after a two-year analysis, shows that long-term exposure to TCE can cause cancer and other health issues, and recommends that workers take serious precautions if they must use TCE.

But in its press release, the EPA acknowledged there was something wrong — not with the risk assessment itself — but with its timeline: It was the first final risk assessment for a chemical issued by the EPA since 1986.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

If You Love this Planet, “Coal Rollers” Hate You

Coal Rolling:

Peter Sinclair writes at Climate Denial Crock of the Week:

Napoleon famously said, “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.”  I normally would like to assume that others who do not share my views are still people who have a legitimate set of values, and may just be misinformed. But harsh experience teaches, we can’t automatically assume that everyone cares about the natural world, the planet we leave to our children, or the creatures with whom we share it.

It’s obligatory for climate denial shills to preface anti-environment rants with “of course we all want clean air and pure water, but…”

Anyone that’s followed the litany of anti-environment initiatives and rhetoric by the current crop of non-conserving “conservatives”, or listened to Rush Limbaugh’s hatred and venom toward the natural world, might understandably be skeptical.

Now there’s this.

Business Insider:

Pickup trucks customized to spew black smoke into the air are quickly becoming the newest weapon in the culture wars.

Read the rest
Continue Reading