Tag Archives | eyes

Here’s What Your Eyes Look Like When You Take Different Drugs

via Vice:

Eyes are the window to your soul, and that doesn’t stop being true no matter how many illegal substances you consume on a night out. But can your eyes really tell when you’re actually on something? From pupils the size of a needlepoint to huge black holes with barely visible irises, we snapped our way through Berlin’s nightclubs to see if people’s eyeballs could tell us the night’s story. How much does the size of your pupils actually have to do with the substances you’ve taken?

The stuff in drugs that makes you relaxed, happy or just really awake not only manipulates the neurotransmitters in your brain, but can also affect physiological processes in your body. This includes the muscles in your eyes that are responsible for making your pupils bigger (to let in more light, for example), or smaller.

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To see more eyes and read more, go here: http://www.vice.com/read/can-you-tell-what-drugs-someones-on-just-by-looking-at-their-eyes-876

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Electric Shock Gives Man Permanent Stars In His Eyes

starryA whole new way to see the world via ABC News:

The unidentified man, 42, developed star-shaped cataracts after being shocked by 14,000 volts of electricity on his shoulder.

According to a case report in the New England Journal of Medicine, four weeks after being shocked the man sought medical help when his eyesight started to deteriorate. He was able to regain his sight after doctors performed cataract surgery.

While the cataracts were fixable, further deterioration in his vision left him legally blind although he was able to read by using visual aids. In an earlier study on another man who spontaneously developed star-shaped cataracts, doctors theorized that “shock-waves” caused the unusual pattern.

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Bones Grow In Woman’s Eye Following Cosmetic Anti-Wrinkle Stem Cell Procedure

Leap into stem cell revolution without caution, and strange things can happen. Via Popular Science:

Stem cell surgery, in which stem cells from a patient’s body are transplanted into some other part of the body, is gaining in popularity. One patient in Los Angeles found out the hard way that the surgery is largely untested and unregulated.

Stem cells are sometimes used for anti-aging purposes, the idea being that they’ll turn into brand-new tissue and help heal aging cells nearby. But her doctors also used a dermal filler largely made of calcium hydroxylapatite, which happens to trigger stem cells to turn into…well, bone, rather than new tissue.

The woman is recovering nicely, but it’s a really fascinating story of how powerful and potent stem cells are–and how we need to be careful with how we use them in these early stages of stem cell use.

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Scientists Create Proteins To Enable Human Eyes To See A Wider Color Spectrum

Body modification to expand the realm of the senses, New Scientist reports:

Researchers have altered the structure of a protein normally found in the human eye so that it can absorb a type of red light that we cannot normally see. The new protein could, in theory, give us the ability to see reds that are currently beyond our visible spectrum.

Colour vision in nearly all animals depends on specialised chemicals called chromophores, which sit inside proteins and absorb different wavelengths of light. Specific protein structures are thought to determine the absorption spectrum of the chromophores within. Babak Borhan at Michigan State University and his colleagues engineered a series of mutations which altered the structure of human chromophore-containing proteins.

If these proteins were present in the eye you would be able to see red light that is invisible to you now, says co-author James Geiger, also at Michigan State University. But since objects reflect a mixture of light, the world would not necessarily always appear more red.

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Giant Eyeball Washes Ashore On Florida Beach

The Orlando Sentinel reports on a monstrous find:

In Pompano Beach, Gino Covacci noticed a strange ball-like object at the high tide line. He kicked it over and found himself staring at the biggest eyeball he had ever seen. “It was very, very fresh,” he said Thursday. “It was still bleeding when I put it in the plastic bag.”

He notified a police officer, who gave him the phone number for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. It will be preserved in formalin, a mixture of formaldehyde and water, before being sent for analysis to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg, said Carli Segelson, spokeswoman for the wildlife commission.

No one could say immediately what species the giant eye came from. Charles Messing, a professor at Nova Southeastern University’s Oceanographic Center, said he couldn’t rule out a giant squid.

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Hot New Cosmetic Surgery Trend: Eye Whitening

Down in the dumps? Stuck in a rut? It might be because your eyes aren’t white enough, making you unattractive and unlovable. Luckily, there’s a serious medical procedure to fix this; ABC reports on the growing popularity of eye-whitening surgery. It costs $3,000 to $5,000 (that’s per eye), possible side effects include dry eyes, scarring, and infection, and it’s almost as effective as using eye drops:

As a lawyer Steven Smith works long hours and reads a lot of fine print. But he blames years of sun exposure for making his eyes red.

It irritates him when people tell him how tired he looks. So when his ophthalmologist, Dr. Brian Boxer Wachler, described the new eye-whitening procedure called I-BRITE, Smith decided to give it a try. I-BRITE is basically a procedure called conjunctivoplasty, a procedure that’s been around for decades. Surgeons use this to remove pterygium, or growths in the eyes.

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