Tag Archives | Feminism

Ordain Women leader Excommunicated By Mormon Church

Book O fMormonApparently, the Mormons, like many Judeo-Christian-derived faiths, believe that the penis is God’s antenna: If you don’t have one, you won’t be able to tune in to the latest updates from the Lord’s all-talk radio station in the sky.

Not being especially religious myself, it’s hard for me to understand how upsetting it might be to be tossed out of your church, but were I this woman, I’d wear an excommunication from the Mormons like a badge of honor.

The Mormon church has ex-communicated the founder of a prominent women’s group for “conduct contrary” to its laws and order, according to an email cited Monday by the woman involved.

Kate Kelly, a founder of Ordain Women, said in a blog that she had been informed of her ouster after an all-male panel held a disciplinary trial over her case on Sunday.

The panel convicted her of the charge of apostasy, she said, and has decided to excommunicate her, the most serious punishment that can be levied by a church court.

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No Thanks, Reddit: No ‘RedPill’ For Me

PIC: WimB (CC)

PIC: WimB (CC)

Andrew Gonsalves writes at Don’t Feed the Animals:

I recently stumbled across a subreddit called “TheRedPill” and I am a little saddened by it. I’ve long been aware of pick-up artist logic, anti-feminism, and general alpha-male mentality, so this community’s existence is not surprising. What’s so sad about it is that it represents a portion of the population whose first reaction to the illusion of being marginalized is to push back in the opposite direction. They call this adaptation, but what they’re really doing is painting themselves in with every other movement that fought social change to the bitter end.

To summarize The Red Pill, it’s basically a bunch of men huddling together and complaining about how women are by nature incompetent and should not be trusted with any responsibility or authority. This also means that they view women, not as individuals, but as naive, manipulable creatures who inconveniently just happen to be holding the one thing they need them for – sex – at arm’s length.

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Artist Introduces New ‘Average’ Doll As Healthy Alternative to Barbie

Hey kids! Meet Lammily, the doll with the reasonably realistic body of a 19 year-old American woman! Lammily is the creation of artist Nickolay Lamm, who hopes to raise enough money for his dolls to go into mass production as a competitor to the freakishly proportioned Barbie. I’ll be the first to tell you that I know absolutely nothing about what it’s like to be a young girl, but as a young boy I always played with toys that were representative of anything but average people. I have zero problem with the “average” doll, but when I played with action figures it was about fantasy: Superheroes, GI Joes, Star Wars characters, monsters, and more. That being said, I’ll happily accept that men don’t suffer from the same kinds of body issues that women do, so it’s probably comparing apples and oranges.

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Matriarchy? Patriarchy? (Answer: Kyriarchy)

Mary_SpearFrom psychologist Alice Miller’s website:

From: Duncan Mcdermott

Alice,

When I was a little boy I was beaten by men and women. Teachers, parents, friends of my parents, parents of other little boys – just about any adult – would beat me or slap me around casually, sometimes raging with fury, other times just kind of happy slapping for jesus.

Generally I found the men easier to predict, they didn’t seem so outwardly angry as the women. Women hit less often than men, but, and this is a very big but, men usually beat as a result of women’s insistence. Without this virulent insistence I might have been beaten much less.

The school I attended from the age of three up to eleven when I went to the all-male high school, were matriarchies. At times they had a headmaster, but a headmistress was much more usual. They had only two or three male teachers, all the rest were women.Where I went to school in South Africa, Natal School Regulations forbade the striking of ‘any girl’ in any circumstances.

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Swedish Movie Theaters To Display Films’ Gender Equality Rating

theaters

This is probably more helpful than the current MPAA rating system in use here. Via the Washington Post:

Four Swedish movie theaters touched off a heated debate across Stockholm last month — and in the English-language media this morning — with the announcement that they plan to begin publicly labeling films that pass the so-called “Bechdel test.” The metric gauges whether a film meets a bare minimum standard for developed female characters.

Promoters are encouraging theaters to stamp its “A” logo on the movie posters and pre-roll screens of any film that (1) has at least two female characters who (2) talk to each other (3) about something other than men. A surprisingly high proportion of films fail this test.

In the weeks since, it has been covered in a dozen newspaper columns and earning the endorsements of Equalisters, Women in Television and Film and a popular cable movie channel and, controversially, the blessing of Anna Serner, who presides over Sweden’s state-funded film institute.

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How Feminism Was Co-Opted By Capitalism

LandscapeVia the Guardian, Nancy Fraser on reclaiming the ideals of feminism that have been co-opted by the dominant economic system:

As a feminist, I’ve always assumed that by fighting to emancipate women I was building a better world – more egalitarian, just and free. But lately I’ve begun to worry that our critique of sexism is now supplying the justification for new forms of inequality and exploitation.

Feminist ideas that once formed part of a radical worldview are increasingly expressed in individualist terms. Where feminists once criticised a society that promoted careerism, they now advise women to “lean in”. A movement that once prioritised social solidarity now celebrates female entrepreneurs. A perspective that once valorised “care” and interdependence now encourages individual advancement and meritocracy.

What lies behind this shift is a sea-change in the character of capitalism. The state-managed capitalism of the postwar era has given way to a new form of capitalism – “disorganised”, globalising, neoliberal.

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Republicans Now Seeking To Prevent Women From Voting

votersIt’s no longer just about minorities, the poor, and college students; introducing the next target for disenfranchisement. The New Civil Rights Movement notes that Republicans in Texas (and a number of other states) have now devised and passed new voter ID laws that will render a large fraction of female voters, but not male voters, ineligible to vote:

As of November 5, Texans must show a photo ID with their up-to-date legal name. Only 66% of voting age women have ready access to a photo document that will attest to proof of citizenship. This is largely because women have not updated their documents with their married names. Suddenly 34% of women voters are scrambling for an acceptable ID, while 99% of men are home free.

A birth certificate is not enough. Women voters will have to show legal proof of a name change: a marriage license, a divorce decree, or court ordered change; and they have to be the original documents.

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How Suppression Led to Tarantism and Dancing Mania

dancing mania

I refuse to dance unless I’ve consumed at least half of my weight in grain alcohol (though I have been known to attempt the Dougie, as long as I’m by myself and the curtains have been drawn).  Generally speaking, a request to get down on the dance floor will almost certainly send me into a state of blind terror, accompanied by hives and the ice sweats.

You can imagine, then, my horror when hearing about “tarantism,” a disease which causes its victims to become irritable and restless, and was fatal unless treated immediately by engaging in aggressive dancing.  It was relatively common during the 16th and 17th centuries in southern Italy, and is said to be the origin of the popular folk dance, “Tarantella,” which was performed by victims as the most important part of their therapy.

Hydrotherapy was also considered to be an important part of the healing process.  Suffering would abate while listening to the soft sound of a gentle waterfall.  Cloth would be soaked in wine and wrapped around the shoulders of a dancer.  Many victims craved water and were even known to accidentally drown themselves, following deep contemplation of the ocean.… Read the rest

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Patriarchy Is the Oppression of Men

maretel11Have fun debating this one, disinfonauts!  Asha James (a woman) writes at a Voice for Men:

We cast others into the roles of agent and patient. Agents do things, patients have things done to them. People prefer to deliver pain to agents, even those agents who act in the benefit to others, than patients. Agents, good or bad, are seen as both capable of enduring more pain than patients and elicit less sympathy when they do so.[1]

This dichotomy divides people into those who can expect to draw upon the resources of society to be protected and provided for, and those who can’t.

This dynamic can also be titled ‘hyperagency’[2]. Hyperagency is the perception that a group of people has more agency than they actually do. Being cast in the role of hyperagent has significant drawbacks for groups so cast and throughout history we can see groups of marginalized people cast into this role as scapegoats.

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