Fiction



I was at the high school dance. Waste of an evening. I mean, I wouldn’t have even considered going to something like this. It was embarrassing. But I knew she’d be there. I…


A fictional reflection on the realities of homelessness. Meng-hu writes at hermit’s thatch: Fictional, but based on an actual conversation, with the interlocutor here speaking. I’ve been homeless for ten years. I…


Vampires. I know, I know–I always seem to be talking about them here. Not the sparkly ones, not the infamous Count, not the myriad of angst-ridden near-vamps in recent science-fiction and paranormal…



Via London Real Graham Hancock talks about his recent switch to writing fiction and his latest novel, ‘War God’! Watch the full Graham Hancock interview here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6Hqm0…


Alan Moore interviews are always worth reading. Here he discusses psychogeography as it applies to various of his works. via Reasons I Do Not Dance: What exactly, in your not unlimited understanding,…


For the first time in English, from celebrated post-modern author Hideo Furukawa, comes Belka, Why Don’t You Bark?, an epic of magical realism as seen through the eyes of several military dogs:

In 1943, Japanese troops retreat from the Aleutian island of Kiska, leaving 4 military dogs behind. One dies, and the others are taken under the protection of U.S. troops. Meanwhile in the USSR, a KGB military dog handler kidnaps the daughter of a Japanese yakuza. Named after the Russian astronaut dog Strelka, the girl develops a psychic connection with canines… The thought provoking adventure continues, following the dogs and their descendants through the Korean conflict, the Space Race, and the collapse of Communism.

Click here for an excerpt of Belka Why Don’t You Bark?


For those who may be interested, here’s a  short story I wrote about drones kicking ass in the future.  Enjoy! Tolerance has never brought civil war, intolerance has covered the earth with…


Trust Mark Frauenfelder of BoingBoing to persuade erudite author Joscelyn Godwin to choose his favorite novels inspired by the occult. Here Godwin and writing partner Guido Mina di Sospiro pick five in…



I thought it would be interesting to continue the discussion from my previous post on “Steampunk and Anarchism” (found here). This next article by Magpie Killjoy explores the intersection of radical politics…



In this column for Toronto Standard, Emily Keeler asks, “Are Dystopic literary visions becoming the way of the world?” Call me Henry Case, but i think she might be on to something….



[disinfo ed.’s note: the following is a short piece of satirical fiction by Philip Weaver regarding the economy and job loss.] Most people believe that COINTELPRO, the FBI program to infiltrate and…



managainstthefuture cover[disinfo ed.’s note: The following is an excerpt from Bryan Young‘s book of short stories, “Man Against the Future.”]

The year was 2081 and so many of the social problems humans had faced over the last hundred years were still a pretty big problem. Most people were still poor, corporations still ran the government, and politicians were constantly caught with prostitutes of both sexes, living and dead. When politicians weren’t blowing each other’s personal lives completely out of proportion for political gain, they were starting wars with other countries. Sometimes, they would even start wars with people inside their own country, but those were usually ideological. Perhaps the biggest and worst change was that the polar ice caps had melted and much of the Mojave Desert was now prime beachfront property. That, and the air across the globe tasted like you were sucking on a tailpipe.

As pressing and horrible as those issues were, they really didn’t enter into the minds of John and Mildred Bates. They were working class and average in most ways. John worked a standard sixty hour work week and, to help make ends meet, Mildred picked up thirty-nine hours a week, part time, working at the deli counter at the local, national chain grocery emporium.