Tag Archives | film

20 Terrible Scientists in TV and Film


Louisa Walker via Den of Geek:

Indiana Jones is a great movie character, but a terrible scientist. Here are 19 more for your consideration…

Scientists can get a bad rap in films and TV. As Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory utters “it’s amazing how many supervillains have advanced degrees.” They are often the source of a lot of the troubles that the heroes face, either through lab accidents or a slight megalomania problem. As science is being increasingly used in films to explain strange goings-on, I thought it worth looking for the examples of scientists in films who give our job a bad name.

So, some ground rules first.

The definition of “worst” in this list can relate to simply being bad at science. However, there is an inherent understanding in the world of science that your work should be conducted to an ethical code. Science in general is geared towards helping people or improving the world, through things such as finding ways to cure diseases or developing technology to make people’s lives easier.

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How to Get a Bad Cop Fired

Matt Agorist writes at the Free Thought Project:

While police brutality may seem overwhelming at times, it is important to remember that brutal police are the few and those of us who want peace are the many.

It is also important to remember that police work for the many. 

Matthew Cooke is an Oscar-nominated documentary film producer, who has since turned to making powerful and hard-hitting minifilms about the police state.

More here.

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A stop-motion animated dream allegory.

This was submitted to us by a reader. It’s an interesting short, if albeit a little clunky. Some of the stop-motion isn’t as clean as it could be, but it’s interesting nonetheless. I caught what I suspect are references to Un Chien Andalou, Lynch’s Rabbits, and possibly The Metamorphosis.

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Remembering Wes Craven

Cinema lost a giant last night as horror master Wes Craven passed away from brain cancer. Craven was a powerhouse in the horror world, bringing us classics such as The Last House on the Left, The Hills Have Eyes, and the Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream franchises.

While we horror aficionados will lament his passing, we can rest assured that his legacy will live on.

Notable Quotes:

“I believe the cinema is one of our principal forms of art. It is an incredibly powerful way to tell uplifting stories that can move people to cry with joy and inspire them to reach for the stars.”

“I think there is something about the American dream, the sort of Disneyesque dream, if you will, of the beautifully trimmed front lawn, the white picket fence, mom and dad and their happy children, God-fearing and doing good whenever they can, and the flip side of it, the kind of anger and the sense of outrage that comes from discovering that that’s not the truth of the matter, that gives American horror films, in some ways, kind of an additional rage.”

“The horrors of retirement.… Read the rest

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The Lost Spiritual Path in Wes Anderson’s Films

11783040314_4e4dae9a6c_zOn elephant journal, I explore what happened to the aspect of Wes Anderson’s older films in which a white male undergoes a transformation to a new paradigm of living:

About a decade ago, acclaimed director Wes Anderson started taking some flak for what critics perceived as repetition of childish content, or content he had imagined in his youth. I didn’t agree with the Hollywood echo chamber at the time, but I also never really got Anderson’s films until “The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou” (2004). Despite being a twentysomething, I related far too much to Bill Murray’s rendition of a man in mid-life crisis.

As I reacquainted myself with Anderson’s back catalogue (and discovered his feature debut, “Bottle Rocket”, from 1996), I started to notice symbols, character types and traits that reappear in a seemingly intentional way: the overachieving kid, the has-been adult, the disgruntled wife, ex-wife, or widow and even the pregnant woman.

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Esoteric Symbolism and Hidden Meaning Uncovered in the Matrix Film

Jay Dyer via Waking Times:

The Matrix, as I’ve joked many times, is one of those perennial topics in philosophy 101 classes that tends to evoke the most inane and mindless “philosophizing” by the mind-warped morass of modern morlocks. Yet still, it is a film that is packed with esoteric symbolism, philosophy, “predictive programming,” and all other manner of poppy culture engineering. In this analysis, we are going to go elucidate themes, motifs and symbols missed by other sites, as we consider one of the system’s principal works of self-flattery. Interestingly, of all films to analyze in the way sites like mine do, this the most obvious seems forgotten in the haze of the now umpteen hundred Eyes Wide Shut analyses.


The Matrix begins with a computerized image of the Warner Bros. logo, a phone ring, and a conversation between Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) and Cypher (Joe Pantoliano) about watching “him” (Neo, Keanu Reeves), and whether the line is secure.

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