Tag Archives | film

The Difference Between a Great Horror Movie and a Great Halloween Movie

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via Screen Crush:

I never watch ‘Halloween’ on Halloween.

That’s not to say that I dislike John Carpenter’s slasher classic. In fact, it’s one of the best horror movies ever made and a masterpiece that I find myself revisiting at least once a year. But when I do revisit it, I tend to watch it in December. Or February. Or even in the heat of the July. The moment October rolls around, I shelve any interest I have in it.

And it’s not alone. You won’t find me revisiting a lot of famous, respected and beloved horror movies when the season of the witch rolls around. No ‘Exorcist.’ No ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre.’ None of those brutal French or Japanese movies that horror buffs like to spring on their unsuspecting friends. The Halloween season brings out something different in me. It focuses my tastes for 31 days. I don’t spend my October watching tons of horror movies, I like to spend my October watching tons of Halloween movies.

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How the films you’ve seen influence your choice of dog

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By Flora Lisica, The Conversation

Did watching 101 Dalmatians instill you with a burning desire to fill your home with dozens of monochrome puppies? A new study suggests that may often be the case. The research suggests that all those great canine characters in films have been a prominent influence on the popularity of a breed among dog owners.

The impact of 29 films released in the United States was examined, each featuring a different dog breed. Classics such as The Wizard of Oz (1939), Lady and the Tramp (1955), The Fox and the Hound (1981) and Beethoven (1992) were all judged to have influenced people’s choice of dogs. The study traces the popularity of the featured breeds for up to ten years after the film’s release.

The authors used the records of the American Kennel Club, which has been recording the numbers of registration for each dog breed since 1927, and keeps the largest such dog registry in the world.… Read the rest

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Interview: John Waters on his “exploitation films for art theaters”

Waters at Pen America/Free Expression Literature, May 2014. © Ed Lederman/PEN American Center via Wikimedia Commons

Waters at Pen America/Free Expression Literature, May 2014.
© Ed Lederman/PEN American Center via Wikimedia Commons

The Film Society of Lincoln Center in New York City is hosting a retrospective of John Waters’ films beginning this week. They are also showcasing “John Waters Presents: ‘Movies I’m Jealous I Didn’t Make‘”:

Here they are—eight extreme, astoundingly perverse, darkly funny, and, most importantly, supremely surprising films that turn me green with envy. Every day I feel inadequate thinking of these fanatically obsessive, ludicrously sexual, unfathomably criminal, melodramatically misguided cinematic gems. Why oh why can’t I make films like these—ones that jolted me out of all cinematic lethargy? Exploitation, art, horror? There’s no such thing as genre when you’ve slipped to the other side of cinema-sanity. See for yourself the movies that drove me beyond the pale of normal movie madness. Jealousy over other directors’ careers is a terrible thing to waste. — John Waters

The series includes CrashFinal DestinationBefore I ForgetKiller JoeThe MotherNight GamesOf Unknown Origin, and Thérèse.… Read the rest

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Interview with David Lynch – Transcendental Meditation, “True Detective,” and More

"David Lynch (cropped edit)" by Sasha Kargaltsev - http://www.flickr.com/photos/kargaltsev/3603597312/. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

“David Lynch (cropped edit)” by Sasha Kargaltsev. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

The Daily Beast just ran an awesome interview with David Lynch. I’ve pulled some snippets here, but you should read the whole thing if you’re a Lynch fan!

via The Daily Beast:

I just saw your fantastic ALS Ice Bucket Challenge video.

[Laughs] Oh. Great trumpet playing, huh? I had to do two buckets because two people challenged me, so I thought it should have some music to it. And I’m agreat trumpet player. And for some reason, I wanted to nominate Vladimir Putin. He might want to take part in helping some people.

Were there some demons you were dealing with when you turned to TM? You started on Eraserhead in ’72, and I understand that was a very fraught production early on.

You don’t have to be in bad shape.

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The Cultural Impact of ‘The Exorcist’

I’m not sure if we’ll ever see this level of intensity again. Though, The Blair Witch Project created quite a stir, albeit for different reasons.

via The Film Stage:

Thanks to inflation, box-office records seem to get broken every few weeks, but looking at the adjusted highest-grossing films list, one of the top ten features sticks out more than any other: William Friedkin‘s 1973 horror The Exorcist, considered by many to be the scariest film of all time. Besting even Avatar when it comes to adjusted domestic grosses, the film racked up $232 million in the U.S., which is over $900 million by today’s standards.

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Onscreen text messages at the movie theater?

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

Ultimate Palace Cinema, Oxford by Jorge Royan via Wikimedia Commons.

There is no other place in the world that can ease my anxiety or release my troubled mind than the cinema. There’s something special about watching a film on a large screen with like minded movie-goers surrounding you. And while I doubt this newfangled idea will catch-on, it’s still irritating to think about. Though, and I have to admit, that I’m often more annoyed by the loud popcorn crunchers and rustling wrappers than I am by someone looking at their phone.

via The Hollywood Reporter:

Theaters in major Chinese cities have starting experimenting with “bullet screens” on which audiences can send text messages commenting on the film, which are then projected directly onto the screen.

If you’re sensitive to people using their cellphones during a movie, then going to the movie theater in China would be far from relaxing experience.

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