Tag Archives | film

How Technicolor Changed Storytelling

Via Adrienne LaFrance at The Atlantic:

In the dawn of the age of cinema, adding color to black-and-white films was something like “putting lip rouge on Venus de Milo.” That is to say, it had the potential for disastrous, garish results. And that’s how the legendary director Albert Parker referred to the process of colorizing motion pictures in 1926, according to The New York Times that year.

Parker’s lipstick-on-the-Venus de Milo line wasn’t originally his—it was the same comparison famously used by silent film star Mary Pickford to lament the rise of talkies. As with sound, adding color to motion pictures represented a revolutionary shift in onscreen storytelling—and not everyone was convinced that change was worthwhile. Even those who were excited about color filmmaking felt trepidation.

“The color must never dominate the narrative,” Parker told the Times. “We have tried to get a sort of satin gloss on the scenes and have consistently avoided striving for prismatic effects… We realize that color is violent and for that reason we restrained it.”

Today, we’re accustomed to seeing color choices set the tone for a scene, a film—even an entire body of work.

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Breaking Up the Narrative: the 2015 Philip K. Dick Film Festival

FilmFestivalDaniel Abella is the founder and director behind the Philip K. Dick International Film Festival, which just held its third annual event this January at Tribeca Cinemas, NYC. I spoke with him about Philip K. Dick’s ongoing, reality-bending influence on cinematic expression.

J: What compelled you to start a Philip K. Dick film festival?

D: I have been a big fan of Philip K. Dick since learning he was compared to Jorge Luis Borges by Ursula LeGuin. After reading VALIS, Ubik and The Divine Invasion, I found a writer of great depth approaching some modern day philosophers. Philip K. Dick represents a distinctive voice that speaks of a bygone era in science fiction where humanity is prized and valued. My first film feature The Final Equation(1) was inspired by Philip K Dick’s mind bending 2-3-74 experience of meeting an alien intelligence he called VALIS. Based upon the good reception of the film it occurred to me that other filmmakers may want a forum to express their ideas and stories.… Read the rest

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GIFs of Anthony Hopkins Trying on Different Hannibal Masks

Hannibal-Lecter-Raio-X-do-Canibal

When I think of Hannibal Lecter, the first image that pops into my mind is what’s pictured above. In fact, it’s probably the most definitive image of The Silence of the Lambs, save for the key art. Or maybe you’re more partial to Buffalo Bill’s notorious dance with what’s probably the most famous man-tuck ever. Regardless, the flesh colored face mask was surprisingly not the initial choice.

Thanks to the Criterion Collection, rare footage of Hopkins trying on different masks is available. Below you’ll find some GIFs. After watching these, it’s easy to see why the filmmakers chose the above mask. None of the others as effectively highlight Hopkins’ psychotic eyes.

Hannibal-Lecter-Screen-Test-1

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Lynch and Burroughs Release Best Photo Books of 2014

BurroughsLynch

In 1963, William S. Burroughs wrote down his photographic manifesto: “Take. Rearrange. Take.” For Burroughs, photography wasn’t an art form so much as it was a weapon he employed to disrupt time.

Ideas about the interactions between time, space, words and images will be familiar to any reader of Burroughs’ works, but it’s less likely that those same readers will recognize the camera-created images on display in Taking Shots: The Photography of William S. Burroughs. Published by Photographers’ Gallery of London and Prestel, the book is co-edited by Particia Allmer and John Sears who curated a show of Burroughs photographs at Photographers’ Gallery earlier this year. The new book also features an essay by erstwhile Beat biographer Barry Miles.

The Taking Shots title refers directly to Burroughs’ no-nonsense approach to the camera, but also to the artist’s famous addictions to heroin and guns. Among Burroughs’ visual creations, his shotgun paintings are much more familiar than these pictures, but his collaged images created by re-photographing arrangements of photographs often burst and scatter with the same energy.… Read the rest

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Interstellar: Bending Space-Time in the Name of American Exceptionalism

Interstellar American Flag

Still from Interstellar.

If you’ve already seen Interstellar, don’t tell me how it ends. I’ve been trying to avoid as many spoilers about it as I can, and once I do see it, to post as many spoilers as possible to annoy my friends.

But there are a few that have slipped through the cracks. For instance, that the soundtrack features an obnoxiously loud organ score. That the plot involves travelling through wormholes to save humanity after the planet is hit by massive droughts (it’s unclear to me if the droughts are attributed to climate change in the movie, though I imagine not, so that the movie’s producers could avoid setting off a boycott by Ted Cruz types). Once in the wormhole, trippiness ensues, promising to rival director Christopher Nolan’s earlier movie Inception in incomprehensibility.

A few more spoilers: The Atlantic has boldly proclaimed that “Interstellar Isn’t About Religion, and Also It Is Totally About Religion.” And Neil DeGrasse Tyson has been tweeting about it – a lot.… Read the rest

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Disinformation is Offering 25% off on All of Our Downloadable Content Until Next Tuesday

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Need a break from the Thanksgiving festivities? Have a food hangover? Or maybe, you just want to sit down and watch a good documentary with your friends and family?

Well, disinformation has you covered. We are offering all of our downloadable content for 25% off. This means you can download most of our films for only $7.50. The sale is good until Tuesday (December 2).

Use the code “cyber15″ to get 25% off downloads when checking out! 

Below is the list of titles we have available. Click on the respective links to check ‘em out.

BONUS: cyber15 will also get you 40% off everything except for apparel in our store.


Disinformation Titles:

Mobilize

MOBILIZE is an explosive investigative documentary that explores the potential long-term health effects from cell phone radiation, including brain cancer and infertility.

To get the DVD, go here.

Greedy Lying Bastards

GREEDY LYING BASTARDS investigates the reason behind stalled efforts to tackle climate change despite consensus in the scientific community that it is not only a reality but also a growing problem that is placing us on the brink of disaster.… Read the rest

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Run Ebola Run

Run Lola Run meets Invasion of the Bodysnatchers in this short satire film that depicts the fear, panic, and paranoia surrounding the Ebola case.  Remember, you’re more likely to be killed by an arrogant cop in a minor traffic violation than you are from Ebola.

“Man… probably the most mysterious species on our planet. A mystery of unanswered questions. Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going? How do we know what we think we know? Why do we believe anything at all? Countless questions in search of an answer… an answer that will give rise to a new question… and the next answer will give rise to the next question and so on. But, in the end, isn’t it always the same question? And always the same answer?”

-Run Lola Run

More from JoyCamp: http://www.youtube.com/user/thejoycamp

 

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6 Scenes We Love About the Sham of Democracy

via Film School Rejects:

Did you vote? If not, is it because you don’t think your vote matters? I can understand why you might believe that, because of how cynical we’ve gotten about democracy in America. Some of that is due to the real world, what we’ve seen or what we’ve been told about political and electoral corruption, not that either is anything remotely new. Some of it, though, is due to the way the movies reinforce that idea that elections are shams.

We’re long past the days of Frank Capra, although his movies weren’t exactly free of the evils of the system; they just treated them as the stuff of villains and seemed hopeful about idealism and democracy in the end. Since then we’ve had Watergate and Bush v. Gore and numerous Election Day controversies a decade, and through it all we’ve had exaggerated depictions of the worst of the democratic process.

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The Psychology of a Horror Movie Fan

THE CONJURING

via Pacific Standard Magazine:

Scientists have tried to figure out the appeal of axe murderers and creepy dolls, but it mostly remains a spooky mystery.

Earlier this year, the horror movie genre was pronounced dead. None of the six horror films released before September managed to break $20 million on opening weekend at the box office, and none ended up earning over $32 million total domestically. The ruling was dramatic and preemptive, of course—full of the same kind of foolishness that makes it possible to say things like “Nobody wants to see movies with women in them”—but still, horror filmmakers and fans alike were worried. It’s doubtful anyone truly believed the genre wouldn’t eventually bounce back, but peak scary movie season comes just once a year.

And then there was Annabelle, the spinoff from last year’s The Conjuring. Critics thought it might break 2014’s horror slump, but the film far exceeded those expectations: It earned $37 million on opening weekend, a higher draw than any horror movie in years, and one of the largest openings for a horror movie ever.

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