Tag Archives | film

Fotamecus: The Chaos Magick Film You May Never Get to See

fotamecusIn 2001, Matt Lee, director and epic beard-owner, announced the Fotamecus Film Majik Project, a plan to make a “film about time and modern magick, a story about shifting perceptions of time.”  The film would follow six chaos magicians as they cast a spell through the use of a sigil to “construct a tool with which our subjective perception of time can be altered.”

The film’s title, Fotamecus, comes from the name of a servitor created in 1996 by a magician calling himself Fenwick Rysen.  In chaos magic, a servitor is an artificially created being with limited autonomy that executes a pre-programmed task.  In the case of Fotamecus, the the task was to literally condense or expand time, dependent on the needs of the operator.  Say, for instance, I was running late to an appointment.  In theory, I could call upon the entity to contract the amount of time it would take to get there, and the trip would shorten.  The problem, according to Fenwick, is that to contract time in one place meant that time had to be expanded in another.  To this end, the servitor was then programmed to self-replicate clones of itself as needed, creating a matrix of servitor nodes.  That way, if I needed to make my trip shorter, then a node would be created which another person could access if they wished to make another time period last longer (insert minute man joke here).  This would keep me from having to “pay” for my time.  With me so far?… Read the rest

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Clark: Making Duchamp’s Fountain Look Like A Urinal

Gonzmomentary.com just announced that “Clark: A Gonzomentary” has been accepted by the Philly Independent Film Festival.

Clark: A Gonzomentary will premier Friday June 28th, 2013, 5pm EST at the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia PA. But you can watch the full early release of the movie on YouTube.

Some new outtake videos:

Clark explains why he creates phallic art.

Beyond The Art: Clark on Clark.

Beyond the Art: JC on JC.

Beyond the Art: Tito on Tito.

Beyond the Art: Daniel on Daniel.

The progression of an artist’s work.

Method acting.” (Handcam)

Dick guy.” (Behind the scenes handcam)

Hallucinogenic Minisode.

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The Explosive Pop Art Cinema Of Pramod Pati

Avant-garde filmmaker Pramod Pati created luscious, poetic, beautifully-scored short films on behalf of the Indian government (sometimes with social-educational purposes such as promoting family planning). Highlights include Abid, below, and 1968's symbolism-rich Explorer. The Seventh Art provides some background:
Pramod Pati, who died an untimely death at the age of 42, worked for the Films Division of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India, which commissioned feature-length and short documentaries as well as short animation films for the purposes of cultural archiving and nationwide information dissemination. The documentaries generally consisted of profiles of artistes practicing traditional forms, educational films for adults, and simple moral tales and basic literacy courses for children. Although there was an obvious restriction on the type of subjects filmmakers can choose, the Films Division, like the Kanun in Iran, was free from commercial concerns and thus presented a higher scope for formal experimentation for directors.
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Valibation: A Dark Fantasy Of Gadget Connection

Todd Strauss-Schulson's expertly constructed short film Valibation depicts circumstances going horribly awry after a man becomes too fixated on the twin streams of validation he derives from checking his smartphone and engaging in casual sexual hookups. Could this be the nightmarish next stage in human evolution? Be advised not to watch this at work, if sexually explicit, stomach-churning Videodrome-style body horror doesn't fit at your office:
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Libra The 21st Century Libertarian Space Colony

Dreaming of planned libertarian communities seems to be all the rage. But perhaps the only place they can succeed is in outer space. Via Smithsonian Magazine, Matt Novak on the 1978 think-tank-produced movie Libra:
Produced and distributed by a free-market group based in San Diego called World Research, Inc., the 40-minute film is set in the year 2003 and gives viewers a look at two vastly different worlds. On Earth, a world government has formed and everything is micromanaged to death, killing private enterprise. But in space, there’s true hope for freedom. Viewers get an interesting peek into what daily life is like when a Libra resident shows off her Abacus computer,  which is a bit like Siri. The film’s vision for 2003 isn’t very pleasant — at least for those left on Earth. The people of Libra seem happy, while those on Earth cope with the world government’s dystopian top-down management of resources.
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Ordering A Pizza In The Panopticon

How much of the ACLU's prescient 2004 short film Ordering Pizza, which envisions ordering a pizza online in a future dystopian electronic surveillance state, has is already starting to come true? Getting takeout has never been so traumatic:
We are facing a flood of powerful new technologies that expand the potential for centralized monitoring, an executive branch aggressively seeking new powers to spy on citizens, a docile Congress and courts, as well as a cadre of mega-corporations that are willing to become extensions of the surveillance state. We confront the possibility of a dark future where our every move, our every transaction, our every communication is recorded, compiled, and stored away, ready for access by the authorities whenever they want.
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Alan Moore’s New Film, ‘Jimmy’s End’ and the IS-ness of Being Who I AM

I feel like a virgin walking into a cosmological gang-bang. My world view has been destroyed to make way for a new construct.

I had a dream that I inhabited a construction supply warehouse and was picking up materials for my new cosmology. I picked up understanding, gnosis and some new pipes for a free flowing system connected to the logos. I awoke from the metaphor to realize that this dream told me that my worldview, and even who I AM, creates the landscape of my reality. “Blame it on last night’s whiskey,” I said and returned to sleep, but the same idea came again in another way: This time, I was in an art studio that my present self does not yet own. Here I made with paint and canvas my own cosmos. Where previously it was a construct, now it was a work of art.

In Alan Moore’s first film, Jimmy’s End, Jimmy visits an unexpected place in which the big show of creation happens, performed by the great “I AM”.… Read the rest

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