Tag Archives | film

BMW Ad Uses Afterimage To Burn Logo Into Watchers’ Brains

A BMV commercial shown in German movie theaters uses a powerful photo flash to literally brand the corporation's logo into viewers' skulls, so that they see the logo upon closing their eyes. Surely other companies will soon follow suit with this cool advertising technique, and by cool, I mean awful:
"What do we see when we look straight at the sun and then close our eyes? That's right, a bright moving disk that lasts several seconds. Every child knows this afterimage effect. We use the afterimage effect for a completely new brand experience."
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Cell Phone Time Traveler In Charlie Chaplin Film?

With the DVD release of Charlie Chaplin's 1928 film The Circus, people have noticed a puzzling detail: a woman passing through the background of this scene appears to be speaking on a cellphone. Could she be a time traveler? The whole thing is even more unsettling than Chaplin's toothbrush mustache.
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Star Wars Saga To Be Released In 3D

Following the 3D trend, George Lucas has found yet another way to make money from the Star Wars saga. Telegraph reports:

The saga in 3D will begin with the release of the 1999 prequel Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace, with the remaining films following in sequence.

A statement from Lucasfilm, the US director’s film production company, on the Star Wars website said: “The live-action Star Wars saga will be converted to 3D.

“There are few movies that lend themselves more perfectly to 3D; from the Death Star trench run to the Tatooine Pod race, the Star Wars Saga has always delivered an entertainment experience that is completely immersive.

“The cutting edge conversion will take that immersion to the next thrilling level.”

Industrial Light And Magic, the visual effects company which will supervise the project, said converting the films will take time.Visual effects supervisor John Knoll said: “It takes a critical and artistic eye along with an incredible attention to detail to be successful.

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Christmas With A Capital C Trailer

The weather's growing a little colder, and before we know it, the holidays will be upon us. One of the seasonal highlights this year will be Christmas With A Capital C, starring a Baldwin brother and the Bundys' neighbor from Married With Children, an insane film about spiteful atheists attempting to hijack Christmas. This is going to be big among the tea-partier crowd in three months.
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Is Joaquin Phoenix Still Here?

Casey Affleck's new film about Joaquin Phoenix is causing quite a stir, with no one being quite sure if it's all a joke, or if he's truly gone off the rails. Trailer and then report from Reuters below: ">
Whether a hoax or not, a new documentary about Joaquin Phoenix and his transition from acclaimed, brooding actor to bearded, shambolic hip-hop wannabe has captivated viewers at the Venice film festival...
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Mainstream Film Rentals Coming Soon To Google/YouTube

hollywoodGoogle, YouTube, Hulu, Netflix … it’s only a matter of time till Blockbuster files for bankruptcy. In case we didn’t already have enough access to instant movie viewing, Google is looking for a new deal with Hollywood studios. From Wired:

Google is reportedly in talks with the major movie studios to launch full-length video rentals on YouTube by year’s end.

YouTube has already experimented with film rentals, offering selections from the Sundance Festival earlier this year when it would not rule out the addition of Hollywood movies. And the site was reportedly in talks with the same studios around this time last year, so this does not come as much of a surprise, the Financial Times’ “scoop” notwithstanding.

However, YouTube’s movie rental program currently focuses on independent filmmakers and music artists. The addition of mainstream, pay-per-view feature films to YouTube would represent a significant development, regardless of how long these reported talks have been ongoing (at least a year).

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How the U.S. Took on Dr. Strangelove and Tried to Make Americans Love the Bomb

From the Guardian:

Nuclear Armageddon has always had its funny side. But the US military wasn’t laughing in the early 1960s as Americans, freshly shaken by the Cuban missile crisis, lapped up Stanley Kubrick’s classic satire, Dr Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

The film – which portrays a psychotic air force general who sets in chain the nuclear obliteration of the Soviet Union – was one of a spate of popular novels and films about accidental atomic war which had the US air force worried that some viewers might believe it all possible.

So in an attempt to persuade Americans that there was no chance of some rogue general or crosswired computer unleashing an atomic war, Strategic Air Command (SAC) went into the film business itself.

The result, a 17-minute propaganda film called SAC Command Post, was never shown to the public and was all but forgotten until it was unearthed at the national archive by William Burr, a researcher from George Washington University.

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Why Do Rappers Hold Their Guns Sideways?

From Slate:

As police chased Raymond “Ready” Martinez through Times Square on Thursday, the street hustler and aspiring rapper fired two shots, holding the gun sideways “like a character out of a rap video.” According to the New York Post, Martinez’s side grip caused the gun to jam, enabling police to shoot and kill the suspect. What’s the point of holding a gun sideways?To look Hollywood, of course. Journalists and gun experts point to the 1993 Hughes brothers film Menace II Society, which depicts the side grip in its opening scene, as the movie that popularized the style. Although the directors claim to have witnessed a side grip robbery in Detroit in 1987, there are few reports of street gangs using the technique until after the movie came out. The Hughes brothers didn’t invent the grip, though. In 1961′s One-Eyed Jacks, Marlon Brando used it, as did Eli Wallach in 1966′s The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly.

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Muslim Punk Rock: A Mashup of Piety and Politics

When I went to Austin for the 2009 South By Southwest film festival I spent a lot of time with the director of a film we had just acquired for distribution, Rip! A Remix Manifesto. The director, Brett Gaylor, is part of a Canadian production company called Eyesteel Films and they had rented a funky little house a little way out of town. It became the place to hang after the last screening of the night, and I got to talking to another director in the Eyesteel stable, Omar Majeed, who was making a documentary about Muslim punk rock. I knew a little bit about it from the Soft Skull Press book The Taqwacores, published by my friend Richard Nash. Fast forward several months and Omar's film is now starting to screen at festivals and arthouse cinemas. Check out the official site for screening info, and here's the trailer: Meanwhile, the film is attracting some serious media attention...
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Think Outside The Box Office

We don't often review books on the Disinformation site, partly because we're publishers ourselves and it might seem as though we have a competitive conflict of interest, but probably more because all our reading time is taken up with submissions, editing, and so forth. I have to make an exception for a book that arrived in the mail this morning: Jon Reiss' Think Outside The Box Office: The Ultimate Guide to Film Distribution and Marketing for the Digital Era. It's no secret that indie film has gone through an amazing period of growth for any number of reasons, not least access to cheap but high quality cameras and computers/editing systems. The way we watch indie film has changed drastically too, from art house cinemas to DVDs that arrive in the mail or from a kiosk in a supermarket, on demand via your cable or satellite TV provider, or online via iTunes, Netflix, Amazon.com or, gasp, Bit Torrent. When Disinformation entered the home video market in 2003 it was perfect timing (accidental, proving the old maxim, better to be lucky than smart) and we rode the wave of documentary films selling in big numbers on DVD. Now that the retail DVD market is dying we're finding new ways to bring our films to their intended niche audiences, and that's exactly what Jon's book is all about. What worked yesterday is failing today and won't work at all tomorrow. The only hesitation I have in recommending this book to every single independent filmmaker today is that armed with the information in this book, a filmmaker is potentially equipped to bypass distributors like Disinformation completely! But, in the spirit of 'information should be free,' go to Reiss' book site...
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