Tag Archives | Films

Act of Killing sequel The Look of Silence unearths deeper truths about Indonesia’s violent past

Getting away with murder. Dogwoof

Getting away with murder. Dogwoof

Andrew Beatty, Brunel University London

Joshua Oppenheimer’s acclaimed film, The Act of Killing, and its sequel The Look of Silence are about getting away with murder.

In 1965, the Indonesian military seized power and launched a nationwide massacre of the left. Much of the dirty work was delegated to death squads and Muslim militias, ordinary citizens as well as shock troops. The victims were party activists, intellectuals, artists, unionised workers and illiterate sharecroppers. In a few months, roughly one million people died, eight times the combined death toll of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But unlike the victims of aerial bombing, Indonesians fell to individual acts of murder, messy and sadistic. These films consider the performance and the legacy, the small print of organised slaughter.

Oppenheimer ignores the wider context of post-colonial, Cold War politics to concentrate on local operations in North Sumatra – a sideshow to the pogroms of Java and Bali but similar in their meticulous brutality.… Read the rest

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Sony Action Cam’s ‘Never Before Seen’ Movies

Sony Action Cam has teamed up with a diverse range of filmmakers, artists and influencers to create a series of new films celebrating the “never before seen”. Ranging from crafty experiments and audacious stunts to short documentaries, sports adventures and scripted short stories, the films celebrate creativity in all its forms and use Action Cams to provide unique new perspectives on the production process and the stories themselves.


The Creature Foetus


The campaign launched with the debut of three films: “Picture Machine”, “Paperports” and “Creature”. Directed by Studio Nos, Charles Young and Ryan Dzierzek respectively, the variation between the three films is a good indicator of the campaign’s overall breadth. “Picture Machine” documents the construction of a reverse zoetrope, “Paperports” lets us peek into the work and process of Young’s intricate miniature paper architecture practice, and “Creature” tells the tale of a mutant reptile on the loose.

The campaign’s remaining films will be released gradually on Sony’s YouTube channel as well as the accompanying site.… Read the rest

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Talking Acid, Feminism, and UFOs with Visionary Director Phil Mucci (Plus Torche’s Annihilation Affair Video Debut)

torche_stills11One thing I’m constantly trying to relay about next level communication is that it doesn’t happen with words, but rather through means of subjectively projected telepathic metaphor. In the vast majority of UFO contactee reports, one encounters similar stories about blackened psionic eyes that peer directly into the soul. Eyes that can project and receive pure information. Metaphorically of course, I’d argue that we’re unconsciously engaging in this pursuit with our increasingly art-centric lifestyles. Theses days, half of our experiences involve movies, video games, albums, celebrity sex fantasies, and cutesy kitten GIFS. The reason I’m mentioning this, for probably the bajillionth time, has to do with this interview I just did with the visionary music video director Phil Mucci (who’s films other films you can check out here, or read my top 5 list of here). I honestly knew very little about Phil when I stumbled on his work last fall, but through watching his subversive psychedelic shorts, I realized that I knew far more about him than I initially thought.… Read the rest

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Listen- 32nd Degree Freemason Author and Brain-Melter Robert W. Sullivan Exposes the Occulted Layers of Iconic Films

Via Midwest Real

“I think for these movie makers, it’s like a challenge to the audience. To say, ‘I’m embedding this movie with this esoterica, this hidden occultism, you find it.’ It’s like a treasure hunt almost.” -Robert W. Sullivan IV


Author, 32nd degree Freemason and scholar Robert W. Sullivan IV is back to blast more hidden knowledge! This time, he takes a scalpel to your favorite films, exposing the cloaked allegory, messages, symbols and archetypes that fuel man’s most popular and powerful narratives.

Hear our first conversation about the incredible secrets enshrined within some of our nation’s most prominent architecture

Our epic stories share striking similarities. Whether it’s the story of Jesus, King Arthur, Star Wars or Interstellar (see it now on the largest screen with the loudest sound possible, seriously!), the outline remains largely the same: a reluctant man with great potential is called to adventure, faces various trials and tribulations, reaches some fully-realized form and transcends the realm of the mere mortal (that’s highly simplified, but you get it).Read the rest

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Aleksei Balabanov, ‘Best Russian film director of the past two decades’ Dies at 54

cargo 200We were sorry to learn of the untimely death of Aleksei Balabanov, director of Cargo 200, one of Disinformation’s rare forays into foreign film distribution. His obituary from the New York Times in relevant part:

…In 16 films, Mr. Balabanov offered a world of hit men, shamelessly corrupt officials and corpses upon corpses in a cinematic pastiche reminiscent of the work of Quentin Tarantino in artistic achievement and exuberantly brash taste…

“The films of Aleksei Balabanov are a collective portrait of our country at its most dramatic time in history,” Prime Minister Dmitri A. Medvedev wrote on Facebook after the director’s death.

Mr. Balabanov’s movies developed a robust cult following in Russia and won prizes there. They were shown abroad in art houses and at film festivals…

Mikhail Trofimenkov, a film critic for the Russian newspaper Kommersant, called Mr. Balabanov “the best Russian film director of the past two decades.”…

The title of his 2007 film, Cargo 200, was taken from the Soviet Army code for bodies of slain Soviet soldiers.

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On the 70th anniversary of the first intentional LSD trip, a compelling new documentary film about the academic study of psychedelic drugs is released.

Psychedemia was the first academic conference funded by an American university to explicitly focus on the risks and benefits of psychedelic experience. Ph.D’s, M.D.’s, M.A’s, graduate students and lay folk from all walks of life convened at the University of Pennsylvania over the 27th-30th of September 2012 to present new research addressing the historical and potential influences of psychedelics on knowledge production, health, and creativity. The four day event brought together scientists, artists, journalists, historians and philosophers from more than 10 countries for an Ivy League convocation unprecedented not only in view of its controversial subject matter, but in its unparalleled inter-disciplinary scope.

Directed and Edited by two-time Emmy Award winner Vann K. Weller and Drew Knight, the documentary is being dedicated to the Public Domain to be freely used for any purpose as an intellectual and cultural artifact – broadcast directly through YouTube.… Read the rest

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LSD Concentration Camps In ‘Wild In The Streets’

If you've never seen the film Wild in the Streets, a lost classic of trashy hippie-sploitation, it's well worth a viewing. Released in 1968, it envisions a dystopian near future in which counterculture-loving young people, fed up with the older generations, take over the government and rewrite the laws to center around youth and hedonism. Under the new order, at age 35, all adults are permanently imprisoned in psychedelic re-education "mercy centers" where, as revolutionary leader Max Frost explains, "in groovy surroundings, we're going to psyche 'em all out on LSD." Is it a nightmare, or a future model for a humane and fun form of euthanasia?
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Clark “Gonzomentary” on Film Threat and LA Web Fest

From Gonzomentary.com

What results from Warwick’s footage is a “gonzomentary,” a mix of fourth-wall busting filmmaking, mockumentary, Gonzo journalism and whatever else can be added into the mix, which includes: Uncle Binky the pedophile clown; a Christian producer/investor who wants the film to contain no swearing, no drinking and no drugs, right before she has a crisis of faith and becomes a mime; a silent film; Tito the drug dealer, who is actually a British actor (David Proch) stuck in a Method acting Hell and Warwick’s own descent into madness while chronicling the adventures of Clark and J.C. And penises. Lots of penises.

Clark: A Gonzomentary Part 1 is a whole bucket of crazy, and I really enjoyed it for all of its insanity. At no point did I really have a grasp on what I was watching, as it constantly turns in and over on itself. Even when I’d come up with a criticism to lodge at it, the film itself would find a way to address it.

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Hollywood Now Needs Censorship Consultants In China

Two of the booming occupations of the future: government mole who weeds out and reports dangerous movies and cultural works, and consultant who helps creators navigate censorship standards. The Atlantic Wire writes:

China’s censorship has become a huge headache for Hollywood lately, as movie studios struggle to break in to the world’s second largest film market. Every single film bound for Chinese theaters has to make it past China’s all-powerful State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT) whose guidelines for what is and isn’t acceptable is more or less subjective and entirely unpredictable. All the studios can do is hire consultants who are familiar with the ins and outs of censorship in China and hope for the best.

Bringing in consultants does help movie studios frame projects in a censor-friendly manner, but after filming begins the filmmakers have to be very careful not to deviate from the plan. SARFT sends spies to the set to make sure everything is going as planned.

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