Tag Archives | Future

Future Weapons Will Alter Human DNA And Cause Genetic Mutations

The future is a scary place; Sputnik reports on weapons that will change the geophysical landscape and alter human DNA:

Future wars will have much more devastating weapons than airstrikes, tanks and even nuclear weapons. Russia’s Ministry of Emergency Situations warned about new threats, including geophysical and genetic weapons that could pose threats to Russia’s well-being in the future.


Future weapons will be based on energy, electromagnetic, radiological, geophysical and genetic principles. There will also be special information weapons to change people’s perception, completely changing their mind, the Ministry said.

Geophysical weapons that can alter the weather were already talked about in the past. People even wondered whether some hurricanes and earthquakes were “natural” disasters, speculating that it was possible to alter the climate and set off earthquakes using electromagnetic fields.

These deadly weapons of the future will target main control centers, essential facilities, technology, infrastructure and population.

Future weapons will disrupt the physical processes that occur on the Earth and change people’s DNA, causing genetic mutations and diseases.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Meet the Food Engineers of the Apocalypse

I hope you like beans. Eater explains why they are the future of food, post-Apocalypse:

When the apocalypse comes, what’s for dinner? Multiple studies indicate that if global warming continues at the current rate, we’re likely to see vast swaths of our food supply vanish. Scientists at UC Davis found that fruit and nut trees rely on a stretch of cold temperatures in order to grow. No more chilly nights would mean no more almonds, apricots, or cherries, among other crops. Other researchers have found that we will also be saying goodbye to cold-water fishmaple syrupbeerpeanut butter, and possibly grains and livestock.

Mr Beans

But while this may sound like the kind of question you’d arrive at in a late night dorm room munchies session, it’s also the question that motivates a handful of scientists to show up for work every morning. Call them the food engineers of the apocalypse, these are people who have moved beyond the question of how to stop global warming.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Eternal Life for the One Percent?

“In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”Benjamin Franklin

J Kent Messum

J Kent Messum

I used think that statement was true. Now I’m not so sure. It’s the first of those two so-called inevitabilities that troubles me in particular. Death is supposed to be the great equalizer, but humans are anything but equal in practice. Once we find a way around a balance, we will try to tip the scales. As soon as we find a cheat, it’s exploited. The objective of this has always been to greatly benefit a few to the detriment of many. If politics, business, religion, and history have taught us anything, it has taught us that.

When I started writing Husk a couple of years ago, there was a lot weighing on my mind. Repercussions of the 2008 Wall Street crash were being felt through almost every inch of life, and more than anyone wanted to admit.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Are we entering a digital dark age?

This podcast explores the risks of humanity storing as much info as it is on digital formats. Of interesting note, when NASA turned off Voyager 1‘s camera to save on battery usage, no computer remained in existence which could decode the date from the satellite’s camera system.

It is possible for the cameras to be turned on, but it is not a priority for Voyager’s Interstellar Mission. After Voyager 1 took its last image (the “Solar System Family Portrait” in 1990), the cameras were turned off to save power and memory for the instruments expected to detect the new charged particle environment of interstellar space. Mission managers removed the software from both spacecraft that controls the camera. The computers on the ground that understand the software and analyze the images do not exist anymore.

From OnTheMedia’s website:

On this week’s episode of On the Media, we’re engaging in some chillingly informed speculation: what would happen if we, as a species, lost access to our electronic records?

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Future According To Anime

It’s something of a truism that science fiction generally is a good predictor of our future (think of the inventions of Star Trek). Hopes and Fears suggests that we should also be looking to Japanese anime for hints of our future:

While Western audiences constantly look to science fiction to get a feel for what the future might look like, anime is often overlooked when they pull out their crystal balls. This is a shame because the talented forces behind one of the world’s most popular artforms have an extremely distinctive outlook on what is to come.

From robot pocket cat children’s shows to battling it out on Mars with the Judeo-Christian god, Japan’s authors and artists have looked to the future with awe, hope, nuclear world wars, horrible space aliens, and giant, highly destructive mecha (that also make for very marketable toys). It’s often bleak, terrifying or just strange, but it’s always awesome.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Humans are Infinitely more Dangerous than Robots


Michael Lee Via IEET/World Future Society:

Innovator Elon Musk was widely reported in the media when he described artificial intelligence (AI) as probably the most serious threat to the survival of the human race. [1] But while artificial intelligence systems will certainly take over an increasing range and number of jobs formerly carried out by people, humans will remain infinitely more dangerous than robots for generations to come.

It is humans who have masterminded organised crime and its global empire of fraud and sex slavery. It is people who are behind today’s worldwide scourge of domestic violence. It was two brothers who raided the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, the French satirical weekly magazine, in which 12 people were killed. It was a young man with suicidal inclinations who co-piloted the Germanwings plane into the French Alps at 430mph, killing all 150 people on board. It was Al-Shabaab gunmen who stormed the residences of the Garissa University College in Northern Kenya while the students were sleeping, murdering at least 148 people in cold blood and injuring 79 others.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Linguist Claims that 90% of Languages Will Be Extinct in 100 years

The Tower of Babel by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

The Tower of Babel by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Sarah Griffiths writes at The Daily Mail:

Sci-fi visions of the future may focus on soaring skylines and flying cars, but the world in 100 years may not only look different, but sound different too.

While there are more than 6,000 languages spoken globally at present, less than 600 are likely to endure in 2115, and they could be simplified versions of what we recognise today, one linguist has claimed.

He told MailOnline that the advent of technologically-advanced translating tools will not be enough to save the diversity of Earth’s languages either.

Writing in a piece for The Wall Street Journal, Dr John McWhorter said that in a century from now there will be ‘vastly fewer languages,’ which will be less complicated than they are today – especially in the way they are spoken.

The American studies, philosophy and music expert at Columbia University, predicts that 90 per cent of languages will die out to leave around 600.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

3D Printing and the Translation of Imagination – Free Radical Media Podcast

In this episode, Free Radical Media Technology Correspondent Atom Jaay re-joins the crew to discuss the newest developments in 3D printing and the Maker community. The conversation also turns to virtual reality technologies and the “translation of the imagination,” the process of creating new things in the virtual realm and translating them into actual objects. We discuss the potential of these technologies for radical social change, transformative culture, and new economic models. Join us and Atom for these and other topics in this fun, engaging conversation.

Atom Jaay can be reached on Twitter.

You can find more from and contact Free Radical Media via:

Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Legendary Dennis McKenna Joins the Midwest Real Podcast!

Via Midwest Real

Dr. Dennis McKenna is a scientist, author and living legend of psychedelic counterculture. He joined Midwest Real to wax philosophical on the ever-novel, topography of society, technology, medicine, the limits of science and why we should always remain humble. 


IMG_6310How many of us can truly say our lives will tell a story? That when we, or someone else looks back on it, we’ll find real development, defining moments and a worthwhile central cause?

Clearly, living a life of legends is far from simple. Just getting around the obligations and momentum that are built into being a modern human can be a tough, if not insurmountable task. Depending upon your roll of the dice, you might be grappling with debt, illness, family issues or any number of other inhibitory obstacles that coerce you into living your life in a way that’s less than ideal. But, aside from that, I’m willing to bet that most of us are actually holding ourselves back.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Transhuman World

eu20141116bvia The Institute of Ethics and Emerging Technologies:

Whatever a transhuman is, xe (a pronoun to encompass all conceivable states of personhood) will have to live in a world that enables xer to be transhuman. I’ll explore the impact of three likely-seeming aspects of that world: ubiquitous interconnected smart machines, continuous classification, and virtualism.

Ubiquitous Interconnected Smart Machines

[…] High Frequency Traders aggressively trade in the direction of price changes […and…] may compete for liquidity and amplify price volatility.
(Kirilenko, Kyle, Samadi, and Tuzun 2011)

Newton’s theory of gravity was initially ridiculed for its “action at a distance” mysticism, particularly by those who were beginning to see the universe as a mechanical analog, built from atoms that kept causes close to effects (Kearney 1971). It was the clockwork philosophy of Galileo and many others that led to much of the technology we now take for granted, ultimately co-opting Newton’s ideas.

Read the rest
Continue Reading