Future




Military tech very often becomes consumer tech, so how long before we see students zapping their brains during exams? Or bond traders? Website editors? … BBC Future says, “Shocking the brain with mild…



The thinking goes, if animals can hibernate, humans should be able to and hence we can avoid death and move towards immortality. Frank Swain reports on scientists’ progress in the hunt for…








Want a glimpse of someone truly born far before their time? Circa 1989, the future-obsessed professor and consultant named FM-2030 (born Fereidoun M. Esfandiary) interviewed by Larry King, with befuddled call-ins from middle Americans. Author of a book titled Are You a Transhuman?: Monitoring and Stimulating Your Personal Rate of Growth in a Rapidly Changing World, FM-2030 told the public that they should be prepared and eager to evolve to “transhumans.” However, he emphasized a brand of super-optimistic futurism that was at its core not about technological advancement so much as becoming increasingly “humanity rich” – more open, empathetic, and compassionate. He died in 2000 and is currently cryogenically preserved, awaiting reanimation:











Can the future truly be changed, or are we on a predetermined path? Chris Woebken and Sascha Pohflepp on grasping at the fabric of reality:

Hermann Minkowski’s light cones gave us a visual idea of how the possible may be situated within relations of causality. Then, in the mid-20th century, those ideas were carried into the realm of geopolitics by the threat of nuclear war.

With a flight time of 30 minutes between the Soviet Union and the United States, rocket technology shrank the future to a point where speculation became a key asset in the arsenals of the superpowers. Big think tanks like the Californian RAND Corporation, scientists, and engineers were systematically mapping out possibility spaces.