Tag Archives | Goldman Sachs

Big Banks Conspiracy Destroying America

Goldman Sachs Tower 011I’m increasingly wondering if Paul Farrell writes financial meltdown and banks are bad stories for the Wall Street Journal’s MarketWatch as a sort of crazy-man foil for the establishment writers on Mr. Murdoch’s payroll:

Imagine 100 Goldman Sachs banks running America and the world. It’s happening. Forget politicians, Big Banks rule the world.

It was just a few years ago in “The Great American Bubble Machine,” a Rolling Stone feature, that Goldman was indicted by Matt Taibbi: “The first thing you need to know about Goldman Sachs is that it’s everywhere. The world’s most powerful investment bank is a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money.”

Yes, till recently Goldman Sachs was boss, everywhere, the “world’s most powerful bank.” Taibbi: “From tech stocks to high gas prices, Goldman Sachs has engineered every major market manipulation since the Great Depression.” What an indictment.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

The Sorry Tale of Goldman Sachs, the FBI and Sergey Aleynikov

Sergey Aleynikov

aleynikov.org

Michael “Moneyball” Lewis has written a lengthy article for Vanity Fair in which he suggests that ex-Goldman Sachs employee Sergey Aleynikov may not have done too much to deserve a jail sentence other than piss off his omnipotent employer:

To Sergey Aleynikov’s new way of thinking, every American could benefit from some time in jail, but in the event that you are yourself actually arrested and sent away, “there are certain practical aspects to keep in mind.” First, dress warmly. Detention centers tend to be freezing cold, even in summer, and so if you happen to be wearing shorts or short sleeves you’re in for a spectacularly unhappy night. Second, carry no cash. “If you have money, they charge you a convenience fee,” he explains. “If you don’t have it, they don’t charge you. The less money you have on you, the better.” Third, memorize a couple of emergency contact phone numbers.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Goldman Sachs Contains 4,000 Separate Corporate Entities

Including more than 739 companies based in the Cayman Islands alone. Common Dreams on the staggering webs woven by multinationals as they split and grow, bringing to mind primitive, blob-like life forms expanding and engulfing their surroundings:

The London-based Open Data Institute has collected and mapped ccorporate data, much of it made public for the first time, showing the complex relationships between multinational companies and their global subsidiaries. Stunning visuals on the corporate networks of the six biggest banks in the U.S. – Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Morgan Stanley, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and JP Morgan – show the tangled webs they weave.

corporate entities

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Goldman Sachs Rejects Proposal To Run For Political Office

The investment banking giant needed intervention from the SEC to ensure that a shareholder’s satirical proposal—that the firm drop all pretense and simply run for political office as a candidate called “Goldman Sachs”—will not be put to a vote at its annual meeting, reports Bloomberg:

A shareholder proposal that the New York-based company run for office instead of funding political campaigns was discarded, according to a letter last month from the Securities and Exchange Commission, which agreed the firm can exclude the measure from its annual meeting.

Harrington Investments Inc. President John Harrington submitted the proposal last year, saying the $6.39 million in 2012 political contributions from the firm’s employees risks doing more harm to its reputation. He said the bank should explore running for office, using a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that corporations have similar political rights to individuals.

“It would be less damaging to the integrity of our political system and our company, for our corporation to directly run for office as a person under federal or state law, than to continue in the current form of political participation,” Harrington wrote in the proposal.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Wall Street Criminal Rajat Gupta Convicted

Photo: World Economic Forum (CC)

A symbolic strike for the good guys, for once, as ex-Goldman Sachs bankster Raj Gupta is convicted of insider trading. For an explanation of why Wall Street is a crime scene check out this week’s Disinfo Deal: Danny Schecter’s Plunder: The Crime of our Time. Report from the Los Angeles Times:

A jury has convicted former Goldman Sachs director Rajat Gupta in his high-profile insider-trading case in New York.

A federal jury had been weighing Gupta’s fate for two days. The jury of eight women and four men found Gupta guilty of four criminal counts in a wide government push against insider trading. Gupta was found guilty of three counts of securities fraud and one count of conspiracy for leaking stock tips to Raj Rajaratnam, head of the Galleon Group hedge fund. He was acquitted on two counts of securities fraud.

Each fraud charge carries a sentence of up to 20 years in prison; the conspiracy charge could result in up to five years.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Goldman Sachs Owns Top Sex Trafficking Site

Goldman SucksSo good it must be true! Nicholas Kristof unearths yet more dirt on the banksters at Goldman, in the New York Times:

The biggest forum for sex trafficking of under-age girls in the United States appears to be a Web site called Backpage.com.

This emporium for girls and women — some under age or forced into prostitution — is in turn owned by an opaque private company called Village Voice Media. Until now it has been unclear who the ultimate owners are.

That mystery is solved. The owners turn out to include private equity financiers, including Goldman Sachs with a 16 percent stake.

Goldman Sachs was mortified when I began inquiring last week about its stake in America’s leading Web site for prostitution ads. It began working frantically to unload its shares, and on Friday afternoon it called to say that it had just signed an agreement to sell its stake to management.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Greg Smith’s NY Times Op-Ed Cost Goldman Sachs $2.2 Billion for Shareholders

Christine Harper reports on Bloomberg:

Goldman Sachs Group Inc. saw $2.15 billion of its market value wiped out after an employee assailed Chief Executive Officer Lloyd C. Blankfein’s management and the firm’s treatment of clients, sparking debate across Wall Street.

The shares dropped 3.4 percent in New York trading yesterday, the third-biggest decline in the 81-company Standard & Poor’s 500 Financials Index, after London-based Greg Smith made the accusations in a New York Times op-ed piece.

Smith, who also wrote that he was quitting after 12 years at the company, blamed Blankfein, 57, and President Gary D. Cohn, 51, for a “decline in the firm’s moral fiber.” They responded in a memo to current and former employees, saying that Smith’s assertions don’t reflect the firm’s values, culture or “how the vast majority of people at Goldman Sachs think about the firm and the work it does on behalf of our clients.”

Former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, 84, whose “Volcker rule” would limit banks like New York-based Goldman Sachs from making bets with their own money, called Smith’s article “a radical, strong” piece.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Goldman Sachs Exec Quits And Tells All

Goldman SucksAbout to be former Goldman Sachs executive Greg Smith is the talk of Wall Street today as a result of his op-ed piece in the New York Times, in which he describes his decision to quit the temple of Mammon (my term, not his):

Today is my last day at Goldman Sachs. After almost 12 years at the firm — first as a summer intern while at Stanford, then in New York for 10 years, and now in London — I believe I have worked here long enough to understand the trajectory of its culture, its people and its identity. And I can honestly say that the environment now is as toxic and destructive as I have ever seen it.

To put the problem in the simplest terms, the interests of the client continue to be sidelined in the way the firm operates and thinks about making money. Goldman Sachs is one of the world’s largest and most important investment banks and it is too integral to global finance to continue to act this way.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

How Does The 1% Exploit America? Find Out In 1 Minute

Even in an Occupy world, most Americans don't know exactly how the 1% does what it does. The mainstream media hasn't explained it, and the 1% likes things that way. That's why we've created a new video series unmasking those in the 1% who are exploiting the 99%--name by name, fact by fact. Each short video--one minute apiece--lays out the truth about a different tycoon. These aren't opinions; these are facts, condensed into bite-sized chunks. Occupy has already revealed the country's widespread outrage at the 1%; now it's time for the plutocracy's dirty deeds to be common knowledge. The best part? Brave New Foundation's audience chose the people we're highlighting. We solicited suggestions on nominees, narrowed them down to 30, and let our audience vote on which ones they thought deserved to be exposed. The new videos represent five of the top vote-getters, with more videos on the way for the rest. Here's one: Of course, the 1% would like to keep its activities shrouded in secrecy...
Continue Reading

Five More Countries For Goldman Sachs To Take Over

octoNow that Goldman Sachs has achieved coups d’etats in Greece and Italy, DJ Pangburn at Death and Taxes lays out five additional countries ripe for bankdom to install leaders:

We present five other countries where Goldman Sachs could install bankers as heads of state.

Where to begin, though? Originally, I considered Ireland to be a prime candidate for some Goldman Sachs coup d’etat action, but it seems that Ireland already got the old Goldman Sachs in/out in the form of Peter Sutherland, a non-executive director of Goldman Sachs, as well as a non-executive at BP. Here are five countries that could use a little Goldman Sachs in/out.

Spain: With concerns in Italy lessening amidst the installation of ex-Goldman man Mario Monti as PM, bankers and investors in the eurozone and abroad are looking to Spain, which the BBC is calling the “weaker link in the eurozone chain.”

This is obviously the first country that requires a Goldman Sachs premiership.

Read the rest
Continue Reading