Google Maps



Perhaps this is only an instance of our tendency to see faces everywhere. But nonetheless, located at coordinates 50° 0’36.67″N 110° 6’51.38″W in the mountains of Alberta, Canada is a geological formation which arguably bears strong resemblance to a Mayan chieftain. One wonders how he feels about recent oil drilling in the area:

How to find the giant profile head on Google Earth. Share this with anyone and everyone who also seeks weirdness.



Via the Guardian, Oliver Burkeman on Google and Apple’s quests to map the world in ever greater detail, and how our maps’ creators shape how we engage with the world: [Almost a…


Amazing, the Mayans’ breathtaking pyramids can now be wandered remotely. The Los Angeles Times reveals: For travelers who’ve never been to the ancient Maya city of Chichen Itza, a virtual window into…


Via Google Sightseeing, a series of aerial shots of Richmond, California that captured more than intended: The ever increasing resolution of Google’s imagery has continued to reveal greater detail people’s lives, but…



9eyes is one of the best collections of Google Street View screenshots, providing a haunting glimpse of the world we live in, culled from all seven continents and presented without context. Are…


The whole world as a first-person shooter game. It’s down at the moment due to a the kibosh from Google, but Google Shoot View allows you to traverse Google Street View will holding an assault rifle, and to fire upon anything (to no effect). It’s quite existentially disturbing. Perhaps, visit your childhood home and unload a few rounds, to symbolize releasing and moving on from the burdens of the past:


Long-term decay on the internet can be a fascinating thing. Google Maps’ not-quite-as-popular sister site Yahoo! Maps hasn’t updated some of its street images since the nineties, giving you the ability to…


Note: click on the image below to see on Google Maps. Harry Haydon writes in the Sun:

HAMAD

A desert sheikh has carved out a big name for himself — by having his moniker etched in capital letters visible from space. Workmen scoured “HAMAD” into the sand on the orders of Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Hamad Bin Hamdan Al Nahyan.

The name is two miles across — with letters a kilometre high. It is so huge that the “H”, the first “A” and part of the “M” have been made into waterways. The mega-rich sheikh, 63 — a member of the ruling family of Abu Dhabi — in the oil-rich United Arab Emirates — boasts a £14billion fortune that is second only to the Saudi king’s.