Tag Archives | H. P. Lovecraft

Lovecraftian Science – Scientific Investigations into the Cthulhu Mythos

BenduKiwi (CC BY 3.0)

BenduKiwi (CC BY 3.0)

via Lovecraftian Science:

H.P. Lovecraft has cited a number of times that Cthulhu and its associated spawn are not residents of our space-time as are Elder Ones, shoggoths, the Great Race and humans. For example, in “The Call of Cthulhu” one of the captured cultists states that the Great Old Ones [referring to Cthulhu and its spawn] are not flesh and blood and that while they have shape, there were not made of matter.

In “At the Mountains of Madness” it is stated that , “…both the Cthulhu spawn and the Mi-Go seem to have been composed of matter more widely different from that which we know than was the substance of the Old Ones [here the term Old Ones is being used to refer to the Elder Things or Elder Ones]. They were able to undergo transformations and reintegrations impossible for their adversaries, and seem therefore to have originally come from even remoter gulfs of the cosmic space.”

Based on these citations as well as other references made by HPL, Cthulhu and its spawn are not from our space-time continuum.

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“Don’t mention the war.” – Some thoughts on H.P. Lovecraft and Race

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Editor’s Note: This essay was first published on David Nickle’s blog, “The Devil’s Exercise Yard.” It has been republished with permission.

When I went down to New Orleans last year to visit the World Horror Convention, I had just a few things on my to-do list. I wanted to see the town, sample its cuisine and take in some jazz–promote The ‘Geisters, the book that I had coming out that year, as much as was graceful–and also, talk a bit about race.

Specifically, I wanted to talk about race as it pertained to H.P. Lovecraft’s writings.

It seemed like the thing to do. The organizers of World Horror had found me a panel to sit on, moderated by Lovecraftian scholar, critic and anthologist S.T. Joshi, called Lovecraft’s Eternal Fascination. My first novel, Eutopia: A Novel of Terrible Optimism, is the only pseudo-Lovecraftian book I’ve written, and one of my aims with that book was to deal with Lovecraftian xenophobia from a post-Martin-Luther-King perspective–to tie Lovecraft’s horrible eugenic notions together with the genuine and just as horrible eugenic fallacies that were making the rounds in early 20th century America.… Read the rest

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Remembering H.P. Lovecraft

Howard_Phillips_Lovecraft

As many of you probably know, H.P. Lovecraft’s birthday was yesterday (August 20). To celebrate this venerable master of horror lit, I’ve compiled some quotes and links.

Quotes

“I screamed aloud that I was not afraid; that I never could be afraid; and others screamed with me for solace. We swore to one another that the city was exactly the same, and still alive…”

– “Nyarlathotep” (1920)

“Life is a hideous thing, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous. Science, already oppressive with its shocking revelations, will perhaps be the ultimate exterminator of our human species — if separate species we be — for its reserve of unguessed horrors could never be borne by mortal brains if loosed upon the world.”

– “Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family” – written 1920; first published in The Wolverine, No.

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Jason Colavito Parodies Lovecraft And Ancient Aliens In ‘Cthulhu in World Mythology’

CiWMYou may already know Jason Colavito for his book The Cult of Alien Gods: H.P. Lovecraft and Extraterrestrial Pop Culture, a skeptical look at the influence of the Cthulhu mythos on the development of ancient alien theories. (“…as some ancient alien theorists believe.” – Seriously. Take a shot every time they say that on the series. You’ll be stone drunk in 20 minutes.)

Via Suvudu:

Jason Colavito’s Cthulhu in World Mythology is a what-if work of speculative history that proposes that H.P. Lovecraft’s ancient god Cthulhu is real, and that humanity has worshiped him since the dawn of time.

Colavito discussed the surprising inspiration behind his book and the intersection between real-world mythology and Lovecraft’s mythos.

Get Cthulhu in World Mythology from Atomic Overmind Press: The eBook will be available late January and the print edition in February.

Tell me about Cthulhu in World Mythology. What’s it all about?

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Celebrating HP Lovecraft at the NecronomiCon

New-Convention-Poster-196x300A longstanding favorite cult author of many a disinfonaut, HP Lovecraft was born on this day in 1890. Fans are gathering in Providence, Rhode Island this week to celebrate his life and work at the NecronomiCon. Report via the Washington Post:

If you’ve enjoyed the works of Stephen King, seen the films “Alien” or “Prometheus” or know about the fictional Arkham Asylum in Batman, you can thank H.P. Lovecraft. The horror writer’s work has inspired others for nearly a century.

The mythos that Lovecraft created in stories such as “The Call of Cthulhu,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward” and “At the Mountains of Madness” has reached its tentacles deep into popular culture — so much that his creations and the works they influenced might be better known than the writer himself.

Wanting to give the writer his due, fans of Lovecraft are holding this month what they say is the largest celebration ever of his work and influence.

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Alan Moore and Psychogeography

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Picture: Karen Karnak (CC)

Alan Moore interviews are always worth reading. Here he discusses psychogeography as it applies to various of his works.

via Reasons I Do Not Dance:

What exactly, in your not unlimited understanding, is Psychogeography?

In its simplest form I understand psychogeography to be a straightforward acknowledgement that we, as human beings, embed aspects of our psyche…memories, associations, myth and folklore…in the landscape that surrounds us. On a deeper level, given that we do not have direct awareness of an objective reality but, rather, only have awareness of our own perceptions, it would seem to me that psychogeography is possibly the only kind of geography that we can actually inhabit.

What books and writers ignited your interest in psychogeography?

The author that first introduced me to the subject was the person I regard as being its contemporary master, namely Iain Sinclair, with his early work Lud Heat.

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The Infinite and Beyond: The Necronomicon Mythos

The Infinite and the BeyondPodcast: Episode 029 — The Necronomicon Mythos

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In the latest episode of The Infinite and the Beyond, we discuss The Necronomicon Mythos with author Donald Tyson who in the last several years has added four significant texts to the magickal legacy and reality of the Necronomicon, with his own copy of “The Necronomicon,” his nozel “Alhazred,” the “Grimoire of the Necronomicon,” and his workbook “The 13 Gates of the Necronomicon” all released by Llewellyn Publications believe it or not? In A Corner in the Occult we learn about the life of beloved weird fiction author H. P. Lovecraft. We explore some fun and heartfelt music by our featured artist Leslie Fish from her album “Avalon Is Risen.” I announce a contest that will conclude in episode #31 so checkout the announcement later in this episode to hear all the details. And In the Essence of Magick, we discuss Magickal Paradigms. All this and more in this installment of The Infinite and the Beyond!  

To message the show please go here.

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Antarctic ‘Lost World’ to be Explored

Picture: "Shoggoth" by Pahko (CC)

Shades of At the Mountains of Madness!

Via BBC News:

Final checks are under way in Antarctica before the launch of a daring attempt to investigate an ancient lake beneath the ice-sheet.

Lake Ellsworth lies below ice that is at least two miles (3.2km) thick.

Its pitch-black waters have remained isolated and unseen for up to half a million years.

This will be the first attempt to extract uncontaminated samples of water and sediment from a body of water so far below the surface.

The investigation is part of a search to understand the limits of where life is possible and, despite the high pressures and lack of sunlight, it is likely that microbes will be detected.

Keep reading.

Microbes? Or Shoggoths?

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