Tag Archives | H. P. Lovecraft

Ben & Jerry’s flavors we’d actually like to see


Vermont is a terrible place. In fact, it’s the only state in the Union of which nothing nice at all can be said.*

Moose attacks. Forests teeming with flesh craving, lyme disease infested vulture ticks. More extraterrestrial anal probings per anorectum capita than any place on Earth. Blizzards of bloody ice and frogs. Bed and Breakfasts. Skeleton Witches. Flannel.

To most of us, however, Vermont is only known for three things: Maple syrup (a sticky insect attractant that tastes like bark and is poured from the head of an effigy of a woman molded in glass — no thank you!), Bernie Sanders (“…there’s too many varieties of deodorant. All you need is Victory antiperspirant: Only people guilty of ThoughtCrime sweat!”) and of course, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream.

An ice cream so foul and perverted that they named a once wholesome fruit flavor after the epitome of all that is noisome, barefoot and dirty, Cherry Garcia.… Read the rest

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Google DeepDream’s Nightmare Psychedelia

The internet is abuzz with wonder and perverse glee because the Mad Scientists responsible for Google Image’s AI have released the hounds a set of tools that let the average Joe and Jane see how Google Images “sees” the world (just don’t ask it about Gorillas. Trust me).

It’s a darkly trippy thing indeed: one part Naked Lunch, a dash of Cthulhu Mythos, a hint of Hieronymus Bosch and a sprig of HR Giger for flavor. And dogs. Lots and lots of dogs.

Puts the "monster" in Flying Spaghetti Monster

Puts the “monster” in Flying Spaghetti Monster

It’s called DeepDream and reddit gives us the skinny:

Deep Learning is a new field within Machine Learning. In the past 4 years researchers have been training neural networks with a very large number of layers. Algorithms are learning how to classify images to a much greater accuracy than before: you can give them an image of a cat or a dog and they will be able to tell the difference.

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A Very Seussian Call of Cthulhu

Australian artist, R.J. Ivankovic has diabolically mashed up two disparate, yet oddly complimentary genres in this fabulous collection: the weird fantasy and horror of H.P. Lovecraft and the weird fantasy and childlike wonder of Dr. Suess. Feast your eyes on the eldritch, sanity-blasting horror of two literary masters melded into an unspeakably delightful melange by creative forces beyond the ken of hapless mortals. We might live on a placid island of ignorance, but sometimes setting sail on the black seas of infinity is its own reward. Sometimes not, as the doomed narrator of the following tale will attest, but them's the breaks, kids. hpl_s_the_call_of_cthulhu___cover_by_drfaustusau-d4knqrz
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HP Lovecraft’s ‘The Colour Out of Space’

H. P. Lovecraft, June 1934.jpg

H. P. Lovecraft, June 1934

[Excerpted from Reclaiming Art in the Age of Artifice: A Treatise, Critique, and Call to Action (Manifesto) by JF Martel]

Published in 1927, H. P. Lovecraft’s story “The Colour Out of Space can be read as a prophecy of this new spectral age that isolates the properly aesthetic component of the social order that would rise in the postwar era. An unnamed narrator attempts to uncover the truth behind a “blasted heath” shunned by the people of a rural New England county. From a possibly insane old man, he learns that a meteorite fell at that spot several decades ago, bringing with it a diabolical entity from outer space. Interestingly the creature does not take the form of the usual space invader but of a mass of unearthly color. As the story unfolds we learn how this malignant color warped and withered the surrounding vegetation, mutated wildlife and livestock, and caused the madness or death of the unfortunate souls who lived closest to its lair.… Read the rest

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Lovecraftian Science – Scientific Investigations into the Cthulhu Mythos

BenduKiwi (CC BY 3.0)

BenduKiwi (CC BY 3.0)

via Lovecraftian Science:

H.P. Lovecraft has cited a number of times that Cthulhu and its associated spawn are not residents of our space-time as are Elder Ones, shoggoths, the Great Race and humans. For example, in “The Call of Cthulhu” one of the captured cultists states that the Great Old Ones [referring to Cthulhu and its spawn] are not flesh and blood and that while they have shape, there were not made of matter.

In “At the Mountains of Madness” it is stated that , “…both the Cthulhu spawn and the Mi-Go seem to have been composed of matter more widely different from that which we know than was the substance of the Old Ones [here the term Old Ones is being used to refer to the Elder Things or Elder Ones]. They were able to undergo transformations and reintegrations impossible for their adversaries, and seem therefore to have originally come from even remoter gulfs of the cosmic space.”

Based on these citations as well as other references made by HPL, Cthulhu and its spawn are not from our space-time continuum.

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“Don’t mention the war.” – Some thoughts on H.P. Lovecraft and Race


Editor’s Note: This essay was first published on David Nickle’s blog, “The Devil’s Exercise Yard.” It has been republished with permission.

When I went down to New Orleans last year to visit the World Horror Convention, I had just a few things on my to-do list. I wanted to see the town, sample its cuisine and take in some jazz–promote The ‘Geisters, the book that I had coming out that year, as much as was graceful–and also, talk a bit about race.

Specifically, I wanted to talk about race as it pertained to H.P. Lovecraft’s writings.

It seemed like the thing to do. The organizers of World Horror had found me a panel to sit on, moderated by Lovecraftian scholar, critic and anthologist S.T. Joshi, called Lovecraft’s Eternal Fascination. My first novel, Eutopia: A Novel of Terrible Optimism, is the only pseudo-Lovecraftian book I’ve written, and one of my aims with that book was to deal with Lovecraftian xenophobia from a post-Martin-Luther-King perspective–to tie Lovecraft’s horrible eugenic notions together with the genuine and just as horrible eugenic fallacies that were making the rounds in early 20th century America.… Read the rest

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Remembering H.P. Lovecraft


As many of you probably know, H.P. Lovecraft’s birthday was yesterday (August 20). To celebrate this venerable master of horror lit, I’ve compiled some quotes and links.


“I screamed aloud that I was not afraid; that I never could be afraid; and others screamed with me for solace. We swore to one another that the city was exactly the same, and still alive…”

– “Nyarlathotep” (1920)

“Life is a hideous thing, and from the background behind what we know of it peer daemoniacal hints of truth which make it sometimes a thousandfold more hideous. Science, already oppressive with its shocking revelations, will perhaps be the ultimate exterminator of our human species — if separate species we be — for its reserve of unguessed horrors could never be borne by mortal brains if loosed upon the world.”

– “Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family” – written 1920; first published in The Wolverine, No.

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Jason Colavito Parodies Lovecraft And Ancient Aliens In ‘Cthulhu in World Mythology’

CiWMYou may already know Jason Colavito for his book The Cult of Alien Gods: H.P. Lovecraft and Extraterrestrial Pop Culture, a skeptical look at the influence of the Cthulhu mythos on the development of ancient alien theories. (“…as some ancient alien theorists believe.” – Seriously. Take a shot every time they say that on the series. You’ll be stone drunk in 20 minutes.)

Via Suvudu:

Jason Colavito’s Cthulhu in World Mythology is a what-if work of speculative history that proposes that H.P. Lovecraft’s ancient god Cthulhu is real, and that humanity has worshiped him since the dawn of time.

Colavito discussed the surprising inspiration behind his book and the intersection between real-world mythology and Lovecraft’s mythos.

Get Cthulhu in World Mythology from Atomic Overmind Press: The eBook will be available late January and the print edition in February.

Tell me about Cthulhu in World Mythology. What’s it all about?

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Celebrating HP Lovecraft at the NecronomiCon

New-Convention-Poster-196x300A longstanding favorite cult author of many a disinfonaut, HP Lovecraft was born on this day in 1890. Fans are gathering in Providence, Rhode Island this week to celebrate his life and work at the NecronomiCon. Report via the Washington Post:

If you’ve enjoyed the works of Stephen King, seen the films “Alien” or “Prometheus” or know about the fictional Arkham Asylum in Batman, you can thank H.P. Lovecraft. The horror writer’s work has inspired others for nearly a century.

The mythos that Lovecraft created in stories such as “The Call of Cthulhu,” “The Case of Charles Dexter Ward” and “At the Mountains of Madness” has reached its tentacles deep into popular culture — so much that his creations and the works they influenced might be better known than the writer himself.

Wanting to give the writer his due, fans of Lovecraft are holding this month what they say is the largest celebration ever of his work and influence.

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