Tag Archives | Hacking

Hackers List, Where You Can Hire Hackers To Do Dubious Things

Do you need someone to be your own private North Korean-style hacker? ArsTechnica suggests checking out Hackers List:

One recent post on Hacker’s List, a site dedicated to matching up hackers with those who need something hacked, was headed “FB [Facebook] Account Hack for Justice.”

hackers list

“Scumbag guy I met at a bar over the weekend followed me home and assaulted me,” it read. “Thankfully the police caught him and he’s thinking long and hard about what he did in a county jail. This is apparently not the first time he’s done this, but he got off free of charge the last time. I want to hit him where it hurts.”

The poster offered between $200-$300 for access to the man’s account.

Since being profiled in The New York Times two weeks ago, Hacker’s List has buckled under a deluge of traffic and still goes up and down on a regular basis. Upon registering for an account, the site reminds users that it is “intended for legal and ethical use” and that “if you feel a project violates our terms of service, please report the listing immediately.” But a search through the last few weeks of job postings on the site shows an almost total absence of “legal and ethical” requests.

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John McAfee: ‘I know who hacked Sony Pictures – and it wasn’t North Korea’

Remember John McAfee, the onetime cybersecurity king who lost the plot and went on the lam? Ironically he’s now a sort of hacker hero and he tells IB Times that through his knowledge of the hacking community he knows who hacked Sony Pictures’ computer systems and it definitely wasn’t North Korea:

Anti-virus pioneer John McAfee claims to have been in contact with the group of hackers behind the devastating cyber-attack against Sony Pictures and guarantees they are not from North Korea.

Johnmcafeesignature

Speaking to IBTimes UK about his current roster of security startups under his Future Tense brand – including secure messaging app Chadder – McAfee spoke about working with the FBI previously but said that, in this case, the agency was “wrong”.

“I can guarantee they are wrong. It has to do with a group of hackers – I will not name them – who are civil libertarians and who hate the confinement the restrictions the music industry and the movie industry has placed on art and so they are behind it.”

In December Sony Pictures was the victim of a devastating cyber-attack by a group calling themselves Guardians of Peace.

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North Korea, Sony, and America’s First Losing Cyberwar

The Interview 2014 poster.jpg

I’ve been hooked on the various salacious disclosures from the hack attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment. Reading what studio executives really think of their star actors and producers is better than TMZ can make up, and the true financial performance of various movies would never, ever be disclosed outside the C-suite if not for the Pastebin uploads. The real-life plot starring North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un, his supposed superhackers, Seth Rogen and the heads of Sony also reads like a sequel to The Orphan Master’s Son. But is it too good to be true? Wired pours some cold water on the fire:

Today Sony canceled the premiere of “The Interview” and its entire Christmas-Day release of the movie because of fears that terrorists might attack theaters showing the film.

The actions show just how much power the attackers behind the Sony hack have amassed in a short time. But who exactly are they?

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Remembering the Max Headroom Incident, One of the Creepiest Hacks Ever

I actually learned about this on Reddit just a couple of weeks ago. If you haven’t heard of the Max Headroom Incident, you’re in luck because Klint Finley recounts this bizarre, but legendary hacking event over at Wired.

via Wired:

Around 9 o’clock on November 22, 1989, Chicago residents witnessed this epic hack. The evening news sportscast cut out, and a person in a strange mask appeared, dancing around in front of a spinning piece of metal—a rather dark incarnation of Max Headroom, the rather inexplicable character at the heart of the British TV series Max Headroom: 20 Minutes into The Future and two subsequent TV shows. On these shows, Headroom had a tendency to interrupt the broadcasts of the fictional TV station Network 23, but this wasn’t an authorized appearance by the character. It was a real pirate transmission.

After about 30 seconds, WGN’s technicians were able to override the pirate signal.

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The KKK Learns the Hard Way: Don’t Mess With Anonymous

(Photo: Twitter)

(Photo: Twitter)

via Take Part:

The hacktivist collective hacked the Ku Klux Klan’s Twitter account after the white supremacists threatened Ferguson protesters.

Participants of one group wear hoods, while members of the other cloak their identity with the mystery of the Internet and Guy Fawkes masks. Despite all that secrecy, most folks would agree that’s where the similarities between the Ku Klux Klan and Anonymous begin and end. But the two organizations are now engaged in a war after the hacktivist collective took over several of the hate group’s Twitter accounts and revealed the identities of purported KKK members on social media.

In a YouTube video posted on Sunday announcing Operation KKK, Anonymous stated, “We are not attacking you [the KKK] because of what you believe in, as we fight for freedom of speech. We are attacking you because of your threats to use lethal force against us at the Ferguson protests.”

Read More: http://www.takepart.com/article/2014/11/17/anonymous-hacks-kkks-twitter-account-starts-outing-alleged-members

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Our Generation of Hackers

Nicolas Nova (CC BY-NC 2.0).

Nicolas Nova (CC BY-NC 2.0).

via Vice Media:

We are all hackers now, apparently—or are trying to be. Guilty as charged. I am writing these words, as I write most things, not with a pen and paper, or a commercial word processor, but on Emacs, a command-line text editor first developed in the 1970s for that early generation of free-software hackers. I had to hack it, so to speak, with a few crude lines of scripting code in order that it would properly serve my purposes as a writer. And it does so extremely well, with only simple text files, an integrated interpreter for the Markdown markup language, and as many split screens as I want. I get to feel clever and devious every time I sit down to use it.

Thus it seemed fitting that when I was asked to join a “philosophy incubator” with a few fellow restless young souls, I was told the group’s name—and that of the book we’d be publishing w​ith an internet startup—was Wisdom Hackers.

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A Hacker Artist Sent the NSA an ‘Uncrackable’ Encrypted Mixtape

The audio cassette greatly increased the distr...

The audio cassette greatly increased the distribution of bootleg recordings in the 1980s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) (GNU)

Math evens the playing field and assists in sticking it to the man.

via Motherboard

In late May, hacker artist David Huerta, co-organizer of Art Hack Day and Cryptoparty, sent the NSA one hell of a snail mail. Huerta built a DIY encrypted mixtape using an Arduino board and a transparent acrylic case, containing a “soundtrack for the modern surveillance state.” It’s a mixtape the NSA won’t be able to listen to because of the power of private key-based cryptography.

Originally, Huerta wanted to make a traditional mixtape and share it with friends and co-workers. But, without a cassette recorder, he didn’t get very far. That’s when his DIY hacker artist instincts kicked in, and he started building the encrypted mixtape at NYC Resistor.

“I made my own version of a mixtape with an Arduino and wave shield sandwiched in between two laser-etched pieces of transparent acrylic,” he wrote. “The use of a giant-ass Arduino and wave shield was chosen since the (shitty) 44KHz wave file format gave it roughly the same audio quality I figured a wiretapped AT&T phone conversation would have.”

Huerta settled on the transparent acrylic cassette casing as a symbolic gesture of transparency.

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Coincidence Control Network: Episode 65

ccn66 Apologies for the lateness of this show, I (The Ken) have been ill. This week: The Big Dog is off the chain, yeah that's right, Ken's hosting again. That's really all you need to know....no?...ok, this week we discuss The latest activistprank from the Yes Men, New moons and hipsters, Hack your face!, Kim's analogue dream tape, Stuff, The weirdness of Mandella's interpreter, Brazilian football is Smash TV, Nintendo gayness, and Florida's cache of medieval weapons. PersonnelKim Monaghan, Frater Isla, and Ken Eakins
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NSA’s Desperation for Secrecy Leads to Stupidity, Alienating the Hacker Community

nsa_General_Keith_B._Alexander_in_service_uniform
via chycho

In 2012 we witnessed NSA’s Director Gen. Keith Alexander put on a black t-shirt and jeans and head out to DEF CON, “one of the world’s largest annual hacker conventions”, in search of the youngest and brightest minds in our society to join his ilk:

“‘In this room, this room right here, is the talent our nation needs to secure cyberspace,’ Alexander told the standing-room-only audience at DefCon, a grassroots gathering in Las Vegas expected to draw a record 16,000 attendees this year. ‘We need great talent. We don’t pay as high as everybody else, but we’re fun to be around.’”

DEF CON 20 By General Keith B Alexander Shared Values Shared Response [sic]

We all know that top government officials lie, this should be obvious to everyone, especially after watching the “National Director of Intelligence James Clapper commit perjury when he testified before the Senate” when he stated that the NSA does “not wittingly” spy on Americans, but the lies that Gen.

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Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey Investigating Car Hacking

Screen Shot 2013-12-30 at 6.12.56 AMSenator Ed Markey is trying to determine the extent to which modern cars are vulnerable to attacks by hackers.

Imagine someone setting off an airbag in a car by tricking the sensors into believing it had come to a sudden stop. Or driving a car into oncoming traffic. Or just stealing location data.

“I write to request information regarding your company’s protections against the threat of cyberattacks or unwarranted invasions of privacy related to the integration of wireless, navigation and other technologies into and with automobiles,” wrote Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass, in a letter to Daniel Akerson, CEO of General Motors, earlier in December. Markey sent similar letters to 19 other major car manufacturers, asking about the defenses car electronics contain against these intrusions.

Read the rest at Raw Story.

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