Tag Archives | Halloween

I Spent Halloween in a Satanist’s Crypt

nzhamstar (CC BY 2.0)

nzhamstar (CC BY 2.0)

via Vice:

This post originally appeared in VICE UK​ 

I don’t like Halloween. I never really have. So at the end of last month—with October 31 and its accompanying monotony of drunk, bleeding faces fast approaching—I figured I should try to coax some enjoyment out of the experience for the first time in my life. The best way to do that, I decided, was to spend the evening with a Satanist.

While media coverage of Satanism tends to err on the horse-mutilation side of things, my Satanist friend Phil Mawson—who, granted, does work at a butcher shop—actually prefers devoting his time to revising the work of Anton LaVey, author of the Satanic Bible and founder of the Church of Satan. Still, I couldn’t help treading a little nervously as I approached the door of his crypt, a bungalow in Cornwall, England.

Read More: http://www.vice.com/read/i-spent-halloween-in-a-satanists-bungalow-crypt-666

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‘I hate Fox News’: California man attacks Halloween reveler in reporter costume

Sean Kory

Sean Kory

via The Raw Story:

Police arrested a California man who was accused of attacking a Halloween reveler dressed up as a Fox News reporter.

Sean Kory shouted, “I hate Fox News,” before grabbing the victim’s microphone prop, shoving it down his pants, and rubbing it on his crotch, police said.

The 29-year-old Kory then attacked the phony reporter with an aluminum tennis racket, investigators said.

The victim was not injured in the attack.

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Ouija Boards Are Even Creepier When You Know How They Work

By Jenna (cc by 2.0).

By Jenna (cc by 2.0).

via The Nerdist:

With Halloween just around the corner, it’s time to pull your Ouija board off that seldom dusted shelf and channel a spirit or two for answers to your most sleepover-enhancing questions. It’ll will be even creepier when you realize that the answers are coming from inside the house, inside you.

The Ouija board first appeared in stores in the 1890s, a mark of 19th century America’s obsession with spiritualism. It was a flat board with the letters of the alphabet written in two arced rows over a straight line of numbers, 0 through 9. The words “YES” and “NO” appear in the uppermost corners and “GOODBYE” is written at the bottom. The board comes with a planchette, a tear-drop shaped device on little feet with a hole in its body through which you can read the number or letter underneath it.

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Halloween’s Origin Story

Halloween

For this latest spooky October post, I wanted to cut to the chase. I’ve grown a little bit impatient with the month. So, here’s a nice little primer on the Celtic roots of the Halloween holiday and its evolution through the ages to the seemingly silly, scary celebration we know today.

Do the souls of the dead roam free during this time of the year? Are the ghosts friendly? What should I do as someone who lives on a former plantation just off the Trail of Tears in the South?

This video illuminates the evolution of the Roman Catholic Church in its relationship to the frustrating tradition of Samhain in the weird, old magickal world.

The story ultimately comes home to America where our current holiday finds youngsters and adults embracing both the macabre and the sexy. This piece even gets into the arson-crazed Detroit “Devil’s Night” bombings that I grew up with in the Motor City.… Read the rest

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The Difference Between a Great Horror Movie and a Great Halloween Movie

trick-treat-630x420

via Screen Crush:

I never watch ‘Halloween’ on Halloween.

That’s not to say that I dislike John Carpenter’s slasher classic. In fact, it’s one of the best horror movies ever made and a masterpiece that I find myself revisiting at least once a year. But when I do revisit it, I tend to watch it in December. Or February. Or even in the heat of the July. The moment October rolls around, I shelve any interest I have in it.

And it’s not alone. You won’t find me revisiting a lot of famous, respected and beloved horror movies when the season of the witch rolls around. No ‘Exorcist.’ No ‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre.’ None of those brutal French or Japanese movies that horror buffs like to spring on their unsuspecting friends. The Halloween season brings out something different in me. It focuses my tastes for 31 days. I don’t spend my October watching tons of horror movies, I like to spend my October watching tons of Halloween movies.

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[Poll] Have you ever had a paranormal experience?

By 826 PARANORMAL via Flickr.

By 826 PARANORMAL via Flickr.

In keeping with the tradition of Halloween, this week’s poll will be a short yes or no question: Have you ever had a paranormal experience? If the answer is yes, feel free to recount what happened in the comments.

Here are last week’s results:

Favorite Cryptid?

  • Reptilians (18%, 98 Votes)
  • Bigfoot (Sasquatch) (17%, 91 Votes)
  • Mothman (14%, 75 Votes)
  • Kraken (13%, 74 Votes)
  • Loch Ness Monster (8%, 43 Votes)
  • Chupacabra (8%, 42 Votes)
  • Jersey Devil (6%, 34 Votes)
  • Hellhound (5%, 30 Votes)
  • Yeti (5%, 26 Votes)
  • Goatman (3%, 17 Votes)
  • Giant Anaconda (1%, 8 Votes)
  • Grassman (1%, 7 Votes)
  • Shunka Warakin (1%, 6 Votes)

Total Voters: 551

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Stingy Jack and the Legend of the Jack O’ Lantern

Jack-o-LanternIt’s Halloween.  Time to help your kids develop their bed-wetting habits.  Time to buy a ton of candy, claim it’s for trick-or-treaters, turn off the porch light, and gorge yourself on waxy chocolate.  Time to carve the ol’ jack-o’-lantern.

One of my favorite Halloween myths is the origin story of the jack-o’-lantern: the trickster legend of Stingy Jack.  This folk tale comes from Ireland, which was also a major cultural center for the Celts, who observed the festival of Samhain, which serves as the root from which our modern Halloween sprang.

According to the story, which may be centuries old, a drunkard known as Stingy Jack was infamous throughout Ireland as a liar and a cheat.  He was especially despised for his love of trickery, his favorite pastime.

One day, while bored and lounging lazily around Hell, Lucifer happened to overhear some horrible stories about Jack’s devious skills, which were apparently even more dastardly than his own.  Not to be outdone by a mere drunken Irishman, the Devil decided to find Jack and see if the stories were true.… Read the rest

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Scream All Night: Horror Movie Marathon Recommendations

thewickerman_lordsummerisleI don’t “cross the streams” too often here, but since it’s Halloween here in the United States (and a few other places), I thought I’d mention that I’ve written a few recommendations for a horror movie marathon at another site. I dug through my own collection and came up with some classics, new and old. I’ve been a horror movie fan from childhood, and this is my favorite time of year.

Via Suvudu:

What’s Halloween night without scary movies? Sadly, you really can’t depend on television to show any frightful fare worth watching, so it’s good to have a stack of scary stuff on-hand. I’ve picked out six movies from my personal collection and listed them in no particular order for an all-night horror movie marathon – if you’re brave (or foolhardy) enough to stay up to dawn with nothing but werewolves, slashers and zombies for company. Note: I’ve scheduled approximately five minutes of down-time between each film.

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Samhain and Halloween: About as Closely Related as a Toy Poodle and a Wolf

An_Arch_Druid_in_His_Judicial_HabitMany people confuse Samhain and Halloween. Michael Tortorello sets them straight in the New York Times:

How will you be celebrating Samhain this year? What’s that? You say you won’t be observing the high Druid holiday of the ancient Celts? With all due respect, you’re probably wrong and you probably will.

“Samhain is Halloween; Halloween is Samhain,” said Ellen Evert Hopman, 61, an author, herbalist and Druid priestess and scholar. Irish monks, by most accounts, co-opted the earthy ritual and recast it with strait-laced saints. But the bones of the holiday wouldn’t stay buried.

The first historical record of Samhain, an engraved bronze calendar found in Coligny, France, dates to the first century B.C. The Druids of the British Isles went to ground a few centuries later, after the Romans rode in on chariots and “trashed the place,” Ms. Hopman said. All the same, she said: “There have been people celebrating Samhain in Europe for thousands of years.

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