Tag Archives | Hallucinogenics

The Hunt and The Hound – part 3


Part 3 of a 4 Part series involving magic, politics, hallucinogens, and ritual work.

Part 1 can be found here.

Part 2 can be found here.

Via Gods & Radicals:

Let’s talk about drugs. Almost all of our drugs, or at least their ancestral form, come from plants, here though I want to talk more specifically about entheogenic plants. The use of plants and fungi (everyone forgets the fungi), have a long and well documented history amongst almost all human cultures for religious and magical purposes. A year ago, a God tried to get my attention and succeeded, and in the intervening time I have come to know him as a God of many things, one of which is ecstasy. As I work in a botanic institution I have access to (probably) the world’s best botanical and mycological library and its resources, so I set out to do some homework. The classic enthogenic plant family is theSolanaceae; the nightshade family which provides us with a dizzying array of food plants (and is the third most important agricultural plant family after the grasses – Poaceae – and the pea/bean family – Fabaceae).

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Magic mushrooms ‘less harmful than thought’ and should be reclassified, says leading psychiatrist

RuthArt (CC BY 2.0)

RuthArt (CC BY 2.0)

Charlie Cooper via The Independent:

Psychedelic drugs including LSD and magic mushrooms are much less harmful than has been claimed, and should be reclassified to make it easier for scientists to research their potential benefits, a leading psychiatrist has said.

Promising medical research into psychedelics ground to a halt as long ago as 1967, when they were made illegal amid widespread concern about their psychological and social harms.

However, writing in the BMJ, psychiatrist Dr James Rucker, said that no evidence had ever shown the drugs to be habit-forming. There is also little evidence of harm when used in controlled settings, and a wealth of studies indicating that they have uses in the treatment of common psychiatric disorders, he said.

Researchers are beginning to look again at how LSD and psilocybin – the active compound in magic mushrooms – might be of benefit in the treatment of addiction, for obsessive compulsive disorder and even, according to one small Swiss study, to alleviate the symptoms of anxiety in terminally ill patients.

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Norwegian Scientists Say LSD Might Be Good for Some

At the very least, it doesn’t no harm to one’s mental health according to the scientists:

Via The Local:

“There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, or use of LSD in the past year, and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes,” Pål-Ørjan Johansen and Teri Krebs from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim concluded in their study published in the PLOS One journal on Tuesday.
“Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with a lower rate of mental health problems.”
For the study, the researchers analyzed data on the more than 130,000 Americans who took drug use surveys between 2001 and 2004, of which 22,000 had used a psychedelic drug at least once.
“Despite popular perceptions, expert harm assessments have not demonstrated that classical serotonergic psychedelic substances such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline are demonstrated to cause chronic mental health problems,” Johansen told The Local.
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