Tag Archives | Hallucinogens

Trippy Tales: The History of 8 Hallucinogens

János Csongor Kerekes (CC BY-SA 2.0)

János Csongor Kerekes (CC BY-SA 2.0)

via Live Science:

Humans have been ingesting mind-altering substances for a very long time. Hallucinogen-huffing bowls 2,500 years old have been found on islands in the Lesser Antilles, and traditional cultures from the Americas to Africa use hallucinogenic substances for spiritual purposes. Here are some notable substances that send the mind tripping.

8. LSD

LSD is commonly known as “acid,” but its scientific name is a mouthful: lysergic acid diethylamaide. The drug was first synthesized in 1938 from a chemical called ergotamine. Ergotamine, in turn, is produced by a grain fungus that grow on rye.

LSD was originally produced by a pharmaceutical company under the name Delysid, but it got a bad reputation in the 1950s when the CIA decided to research its effects on mind control. The test subjects of the CIA project MKULTRA proved very difficult to control indeed, and many, like counter-culture writer Ken Kesey, started taking the drug for fun(and for their own form of 1960s enlightenment).

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A (Psychedelic) Trip With Dad

Simon Harris (the crescent) (CC BY 2.0)

Simon Harris (the crescent) (CC BY 2.0)

via Pacific Standard:

The daughter of one of the country’s leading clinical researchers of psychedelic-assisted therapy visits Amsterdam.

Drugs were a big part of my upbringing in Southern California, but not in the usual way. My dad, Charles Grob, is the director of child and adolescent psychiatry at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; he’s also one of the country’s leading clinical researchers of psychedelic-assisted therapy.

From 1993 to 1995, while I was in elementary school, he studied the physiological effects of the drug MDMA. In 1993 and then in 2001, when I was in ninth grade, he went to Brazil to study the use of ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic tea. From 2004 to 2008, while I was in college, he studied the effects of psilocybin as a therapeutic aid in treating end-stage cancer anxiety.

My dad’s research library is crammed with first-person hallucinogenic accounts, and I’ve read them all.

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A Guide To Psychoactive Plants In The Bible

burning_bushSuppose Christians took a closer look at what their holy book is truly discussing? NeuroBrainstorm looks at a wide range of biblically-key plants with mind-altering properties:

Holy Anointing Oil – (Leviticus 10:6) Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment. (Exodus 29:7) Then shalt thou take the anointing oil, and pour it upon his head and anoint him.

The holy anointing oil is a potent psychedelic extract…essentially an anxiolytic-hallucinogen. The transdermal application of it led to its absorption and psychoactive effects, even in extremely low doses. The bible suggests anointing with a large amount of oil possibly to ensure a psychedelic response.

Manna – (Exodus 16 14, 31) Behold…there lay a small round thing, as small as the hoar frost on the ground. And the house of Israel called the name thereof Manna: and it was like coriander seed, white; and the taste of it was like wafers made with honey.

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Police Attacked by Blood-Covered Boy With Superhuman Strength at ‘LSD Party Gone Bad’

38419428LSD? Several of my Twitter followers said that it was more likely PCP or Bath Salts. What say you, psychonauts of Disinfo?

Via the Marin Independent Journal:

Three young people were arrested and hospitalized, one with injuries, Sunday morning in the wake of what officials described as “a Mill Valley LSD party gone bad.”

Southern Marin Fire paramedics responded around 7:30 a.m. to a 911 call reporting a 16-year-old boy having a seizure at a residence in the 100 block of Reed Boulevard, said Marin County sheriff’s Lt. Doug Pittman.

When the paramedics tried to get in, another 16-year-old boy at the entry gate covered with blood attacked them with what they later described as “superhuman strength,” refusing to let them in, Pittman said. Marin County sheriff’s deputies arrived within minutes to help, Pittman said.

The deputies were confronted by other partygoers, including a combative young girl, and called for backup.

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Norwegian Scientists Say LSD Might Be Good for Some

At the very least, it doesn’t no harm to one’s mental health according to the scientists:

Via The Local:

“There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, or use of LSD in the past year, and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes,” Pål-Ørjan Johansen and Teri Krebs from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim concluded in their study published in the PLOS One journal on Tuesday.
“Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with a lower rate of mental health problems.”
For the study, the researchers analyzed data on the more than 130,000 Americans who took drug use surveys between 2001 and 2004, of which 22,000 had used a psychedelic drug at least once.
“Despite popular perceptions, expert harm assessments have not demonstrated that classical serotonergic psychedelic substances such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline are demonstrated to cause chronic mental health problems,” Johansen told The Local.
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Norwegian Scientists Say Psychedelic Drugs Linked To Mental Health Benefits

psychedelic drugsHave you had your dose for maintenance today? Via Healthline:

Debunking decades of myths, new research says psychedelics are not linked to mental illness and may in fact have positive residual effects on users.

According to a new study published PLOS One, there is no link between the use of LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, and peyote and a range of mental health problems. In fact, psychedelic use is associated with a lower risk of mental health problems like psychosis, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and general psychological distress.

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s Department of Neuroscience examined data on more than 130,000 Americans in the National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

They found that people who used psilocybin or mescaline throughout their lives, as well as people who used LSD in the past year, had lower rates of serious psychological distress, outpatient mental health treatment, and prescriptions for psychiatric medications.

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A Jaguar In The Peruvian Jungle Tripping On Hallucinogenic Plants

Did humans discover the components of ayahuasca by observing animals? And when large cats go on a psychedelic trip in the jungle, what do they see? The Daily Grail reveals:
A jaguar in the Peruvian rain forest eating the Banisteriopsis caapi vine, one of the major constituents of the shamanic brew ayahuasca. (The jaguar seems to be affected somewhat by the vine.) To make things doubly interesting, one of the most commonly reported elements in ayahuasca visions are...jaguars! And these visions even seem to transcend cultural and geographical boundaries. Chilean psychiatrist Claudio Naranjo administered harmaline to 35 white, urban volunteers, without telling them the substance they were taking nor the expected effects. He was surprised to note that "strangely enough, tigers, leopards or jaguars were seen by seven subjects even though big cats are not seen in Chile."
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The Ideal Mental Hospital Designed Using LSD

Kiyoshi IzumiVia Motherboard, Brian Anderson explains how groundbreaking architect Kiyoshi Izumi employed LSD trips in order to create a more humane psyche ward:

Kiyoshi Izumi was part of a small, federally-granted team of visionaries tasked with developing a province-wide psychiatric hospital overhaul that addressed the affects that clinical environments had on patients. The trick? Get inside the heads of the mentally ill.

The success of the Saskatchewan Plan hinged on mimicking the psychomimetic experience. He’d have to conjure up not only hallucinations but also delusions and perceptual distortions distinct to psychoses. He’d have to eat acid.

It was a bold move. The insights he gleaned from levelling with patients and their surroundings, if we’re to take his word for it, found Izumi envisioning what’s gone on to be called “the ideal mental hospital”, the first of which was raised in Yorkton, Saskatchewan, in 1965.

To the untrained eye, Izumi’s final building likely appeared decidedly non psychedelic.

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